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-   -   Thermal Relief Valve (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/thermal-relief-valve-13143/)

Daddytron 02-01-2012 09:07 PM

Thermal Relief Valve
 
Just watched a rerun of "Mythbusters" where they blew a house to bits with a hot-water tank, prompting me to check my Thermal Relief Valve... Pulled the lever, and NOTHING! not a drop. I figured i should just replace the valve, but if it's plugged, what is the rest of the tank going to look like?
I also can't see the expiry date of the tank.

Should I just replace the whole heater? My house was built in 1992, and as far as I can tell the heater is original.

mudmixer 02-01-2012 09:32 PM

A bound up PT valve turns a water heater into the most dangerous appliance in a home and the current altitude record is supposedly well over 200' from a basement through a one story house.

Just put on a new valve if you are worried about the safety. A new heater may be a better investment considering the 1992 installation date.

Dick

Redwood 02-05-2012 09:58 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Yes, Water Heaters can go off and launch.

The T&P is the 3rd in line safety device the first 2 are the Thermostat and the ECO. After that your water heater is trying to become a steam boiler and that won't work well especially without a relief valve....

You may be able to replace the T&P but with a 21 year old water heater I'd just replace the water heater.

isola96 02-06-2012 04:48 PM

Now that's interesting I would have thought the hole valve would actually blow out if it didn't work pipes would burst before the hole drum goes?.... Lol

isola96 02-06-2012 05:00 PM

I had to YouTube it to believe it but I can tell you I don't want to do plumbing anymore :(


oldognewtrick 02-06-2012 05:35 PM

Wow, that was impressive!

Redwood 02-10-2012 06:04 PM

Plumbing is Serious Business...

And we should always remember that the Plumbing Code is the "Minimum Standard"

When work does not meet code there can be serious health and safety threats...

So if I go off on someone about what they are telling someone to do not meeting code that's just too damn bad...

Don't think an apology is coming...

If you notice the angle of the wall on the home I attached in my post above there wasn't just a hole in the roof...

Every wall was leaning in the whole house....

The cause was the homeowner fixed a leaking T&P Valve with a pipe plug....

isola96 02-10-2012 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redwood
Plumbing is Serious Business...

And we should always remember that the Plumbing Code is the "Minimum Standard"

When work does not meet code there can be serious health and safety threats...

So if I go off on someone about what they are telling someone to do not meeting code that's just too damn bad...

Don't think an apology is coming...

If you notice the angle of the wall on the home I attached in my post above there wasn't just a hole in the roof...

Every wall was leaning in the whole house....

The cause was the homeowner fixed a leaking T&P Valve with a pipe plug....

That picture is scary looks like the Hulk ran into it :(

mudmixer 02-11-2012 08:51 AM

It is amazing how many relief valves are made ineffective because of poor/stupid installation or modifications. A proper drain for a valve should stop about 6" from the floor and be straight pipe (unthreaded end).

Dick


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