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-   -   Thread sealer (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/thread-sealer-960/)

Mudball 07-06-2006 07:32 PM

Thread sealer
 
I have a couple of places where there is threaded pvc. One place is the threaded cap for the clean out and the other place will be below the concrete slab where the feed line from the trap primer enters the floor drain P trap. What is the name or type of product material I need to look for that can seal off the threads and yet still be removed later if need be ?
Right now I have some Teflon enriched pipe thread sealant but didnt know if it would be good for the feed line connector on the floor drain P trap below the slab.

glennjanie 07-17-2006 09:13 PM

Hi Mudball:
The threaded PVC opening needs a threaded cap with teflon tape. I don't like to use paste on PVC because I don't know how much of it may be petroleum products, which will disolve PVC. Teflon tape is safe for the pipe and is a little cleaner to use.
Glenn

Sauna 07-19-2006 08:19 AM

Be sure to check the Teflons ability to stick. I've had a few accidents where the Telfon simply wouldn't stick properly (but didn't notice before it was too late)

Mudball 07-23-2006 04:28 AM

Sounds great. Is there a special teflon tape for this or is it the same small teflon tape that I currently have and use on 1/4" air line fittings ?
Thanks

glennjanie 07-23-2006 02:11 PM

Thread Sealer
 
Hi Mudball::cool:
Yes, its the same 1/2" teflon tape; works wonders with plastics. I found out years ago that when it didn't stick, it was because I had wound it on the pipe backwards. It must be wound in the direction you are going to turn the fitting (usually clockwise).
Under Kentucky code, we speak of thread lubricant or joint compound; a properly lubricated joint will tighten to a point of no leaks (air or water). Male pipe fittings are threaded in a cone configuration, which means the further we screw the fitting on, the better the seal. I used to have my students to screw a fitting on a steel pipe without any joint compound then feel the fitting (it gets real warm from the friction). I know it says on the can it is a superior sealer, preventing any leaks. If the joint compound were the only thing between us and a leak, what will be there 30 years from now? :rolleyes:
Glenn

Mudball 07-24-2006 05:58 PM

I will do it. Thanks for the help and explanation.


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