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Old 01-22-2012, 12:25 PM  
Speedbump
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If your water is that bad; Joe, you would be much better off with a softener, iron filter or just a sand filter ( a softener tank with just sand in it) with an automatic backwash head. That way you buy it once, let it clean itself and you won't have to worry about it anymore. And no more cartridges to buy.

When cartridges plug up, the water flow is cut down. When you restrict flow, low pressure ls the symptom. The guy that coined those things as "Whole House Filters" should be taken out back and shot. The only way a filter that size can filter out anything that would be harmful, would practically take your flow down to nothing. Take Reverse Osmosis systems. The pre and post filters are simply whole house filters, then the membrane has layers that squeeze practically everything but water to drain. And they are used for one faucet which is augmented with a storage tank. Try running your whole house off one of those.

The lakos seperator that Redwood mentioned is a great little unit. It doesn't filter anything, it simply spins the sand to the bottom of the unit for dumping later; and lets the water pass without the sand. No moving parts but the water itself.



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Old 01-22-2012, 12:46 PM  
isola96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Speedbump
If your water is that bad; Joe, you would be much better off with a softener, iron filter or just a sand filter ( a softener tank with just sand in it) with an automatic backwash head. That way you buy it once, let it clean itself and you won't have to worry about it anymore. And no more cartridges to buy.

When cartridges plug up, the water flow is cut down. When you restrict flow, low pressure ls the symptom. The guy that coined those things as "Whole House Filters" should be taken out back and shot. The only way a filter that size can filter out anything that would be harmful, would practically take your flow down to nothing. Take Reverse Osmosis systems. The pre and post filters are simply whole house filters, then the membrane has layers that squeeze practically everything but water to drain. And they are used for one faucet which is augmented with a storage tank. Try running your whole house off one of those.

The lakos seperator that Redwood mentioned is a great little unit. It doesn't filter anything, it simply spins the sand to the bottom of the unit for dumping later; and lets the water pass without the sand. No moving parts but the water itself.
Doesnt this mean that the filter was the issue before it got to the softener? And why add another softener before the softener? Maybe im not understanding it.

As far as the coin air filters they should really be for heat only but if they continue to go bad quick a spiral vent might be a better way to go.


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Old 01-22-2012, 02:03 PM  
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I'm sorry, I didn't realize you had a softener already. Since you do, that is just more reason to get rid of the cartridge. The softener will do a a much better job that the in line filter.

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Old 01-23-2012, 06:45 AM  
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Got it. Thanks bro. I've also heard that you can help get rid of mineral build up in your pipes by running vinegar through them. How does one go about doing that? Aside from the water softener tank, the filter is the only obvious place to "get into" the pipes... where exactly does the vinegar enter? And how much vinegar are we talking, here?

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Old 01-23-2012, 06:47 AM  
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Thanks for any help!

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Old 01-23-2012, 07:25 AM  
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I have soaked shower heads in Vinegar with good results, but the Shower Head has to soak for quite a while. You could fill your filter (inline) with Vinegar and run a faucet until you smell the vinegar, then let it soak for several hours. I'm not real sure how good this will work,, but can't hurt to try.

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Old 01-27-2012, 04:38 AM  
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Default Try these 3 very easy steps. Yes could be your softener

Have you tried putting your softener in bypass mode? Try that and see if there is any change in pressure. First of all get a gauge for the system. One that you can screw onto a hose bib. Get a baseline actual psi first of all. And let's rule out some things. Water softener, I already explained to put it in bypass mode and note the difference if any. Take the whole house filter out if softener isn't the problem. Third if those two easy fixes didn't work focus on the pump.
Here are the steps to starting down the pump troubleshooting line. This is a good way to start deducing problems and it sounds harder than it is.
This is for 30 - 50 pressure settings:

Shut off the power to the pump and the water to the house. Drain the pressure tank.

Take your gauge off and replace it after cleaning the nipple off of any rust all the way down into the water line it is screwed into. A new gauge is like $5.00.
Then with the pressure tank drained, check the air pressure. It must be 29-28 psi, with no water in the tank, for 30/50 pressure settings.

This takes two people. Then turn on the water to the house and the power to the pump. Note the pressure reading when the pump shuts off. Then run water in a large sink or tub and watch the gauge go down noting the reading when the pump starts and shut off the sink/tub water. Note when the pump shuts off.

Then repeating the running water and shutting it off, adjust the pressure switch to on at 30 and off at 50. Short screw's nut is high switch setting only and the tall screw's nut moves both on and off. Use the tall one to move both on and off, and then fine tune the off with the short screw's nut. Tightening the nuts raises and loosening the nuts lowers.

Then if you still have a problem and you need to do more troubleshooting but you have a solid place to start from. Hope this helps



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