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-   -   What to do with drains and shower supply lines when gutting (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f33/what-do-drains-shower-supply-lines-when-gutting-8746/)

swindmill 02-27-2010 09:46 AM

What to do with drains and shower supply lines when gutting
 
This is a very basic question, but this is the first time I've gutted a bathroom. When I pull out the shower stall, what do I do with the shower supply lines? There is no cutoff at the wall like there is with the toilet and sink, so I would assume I need to cap the lines somehow. These are the newer plastic lines.

Also, do I need to do anything with the three drain pipes to block sewer gas, or will the water in the pipes remain and do the trick?

Bud Cline 02-27-2010 11:06 AM

Quote:

These are the newer plastic lines.
What does that mean?
Are you talking about PEX?
If so, somewhere there is likely a water supply manifold that distributes the water to different areas of the structure. Each line has its own shut off. This assumes the system is installed correctly.

If you are talking about simple PVC water supplies then you will have to turn off the supply at the meter (if there is no other main shut off). Cap the the lines, then turn the water back on until you are ready to install the new valves.

As far as the drains go - the toilet drain will have to be plugged, stuff a rag in it or buy an inflatable bulb stop. The shower drain should have a trap in place that will seal off gasses for a short time until the water in the trap begins to evaporate and the line opens.

Redwood 02-27-2010 11:14 AM

I'd use sharkbite end caps on the supply lines and test plugs to block the drains

swindmill 02-27-2010 12:20 PM

It is PEX, but the house doesn't have a supply manifold. It looks like they just used PEX to route supply lines to the upstairs bathroom. The sharkbite end caps are probably not a bad idea. I don't want to have to buy PEX tools right now just to plug them.

Bud Cline 02-27-2010 12:51 PM

Quote:

I don't want to have to buy PEX tools right now just to plug them.
Wel-l-l-l-l then you're ship has sunk. Call a plumber. What you spend in multiple trips by a plumber may pay for the necessary tools needed to deal with the PEX issue.:D

Wuzzat? 02-27-2010 02:35 PM

Sharkbites, or can you plug these pipes with hose clamps and wood dowel sections built up with teflon or elec. tape to make watertight plugs?

A layer of mineral oil on the water in the traps will retard trap water evaporation.

swindmill 02-27-2010 06:29 PM

It looks like tools for PEX would cost well under $100 for what I'd need. That would be worth not having to get a plumber. I just need a temporary solution so that I can continue with the demo, etc. I'll get the tools when I get around to framing the shower.
I think a solution like Wuzzat's or the sharkbites will do the trick.

Redwood 02-27-2010 08:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 41546)
can you plug these pipes with hose clamps and wood dowel sections built up with teflon or elec. tape to make watertight plugs?

I wouldn't dream of doing such a thing...:eek:

travelover 02-28-2010 09:37 AM

Check a local rental place. You might be able to rent PEX tools.

Wuzzat? 02-28-2010 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redwood (Post 41549)
I wouldn't dream of doing such a thing...:eek:

:p

I don't know the overall end-result safety factor for PEX connectors installed by one "of ordinary skill" vs. a home brew connector. Juries probably don't award much money for property damage [as opposed to fatal injuries] so the PEX people don't have too much incentive to put in large safety factors.
http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=PEX+class+action&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe=off&client=safari&rls=en&q=PEX+patent+failures+connectors&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=
There will be about 10# on average trying to pop off the plug, in either case. Since water hammer generates enormous transient pressure waves, one way to check your work would be to rapidly turn off valves in the vicinity. Washing machine solenoid valves do a great job of this.

In any case, the informed adult OP decides the risks/benefits for DIY.


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