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-   -   Florida Re-Roofing Codes (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f34/florida-re-roofing-codes-3296/)

CraigFL 01-01-2008 04:57 AM

Florida Re-Roofing Codes
 
Here in Florida, our legislatures had a better idea:rolleyes: ... In order to appease the homeowners insurance lobby and in an effort to reduce rates(which are skyhigh here because of the hurricane situation), new reroofing laws were placed into effect for this year. It used to be that you could just put a new roof on and were allowed to roof over one layer. Now they have added many additional requirements to the code which requires you to do specific things during a reroof job for homes built before 2002. Some of which are:

1. Requirement to seal all deck material butt joint
2. Requirement to fasten all decking down more securely
3. Require waterproof membrane layer over decking
(and now for the really bad ones...)
4. Tear off decking around perimeter and install special hurricane retraints fastening roof trusses to top plates.
5. Special gable end structural support.

Now, the legislature did consider the cost of applying #4 and #5 because they have limited the cost to the consumer for that portion to be no more than $15,000 (plus the regular reroofing cost of #1, #2 & #3).

So the bottom line is that a reroof job for a house that would have previously cost $12,000 will now cost over $30,000 causing a major financial crisis for most homeowners. I'm not sure how long or if this will stay in effect but in the meantime I predict a big surge in the roofing REPAIR business because roofing repairs are not covered by the new rules.

My question is: What new, innovative roofing repairs are available out there to extend the life of a homeowners roof?

inspectorD 01-01-2008 10:09 AM

Tar
 
Tar and paint. It all depends on the roof type, condition and age. An older roof past its service life is more expensive to repair than change, until now of course.
It sounds like you folks have to let the "elected Officialls" know what a reality check looks like. The insurance co. have a large lobby which it sounds like ...is doing its job.

On the other hand, inventing, new good looking repair solutions does sound like it may be a booming business.

Metal edges and bottom courses, like they do up here in the north could help at the bottom edges for those retro-hanger connections.

Let us know what happens.

glennjanie 01-01-2008 11:47 AM

Hello Craig:
In my neck of the woods many folks are going to painted metal roofs like you would find on a metal building. I don't know whether Florida would allow metal but it can be a strong roof with plenty of screws in it and a good perimeter trim job.
Glenn

CraigFL 01-02-2008 06:01 AM

There are still a lot of composition roofs here in FL but a fair amount of other types such as metal, tile and slate. Of course the problem is in the definition of "repair" -- i.e. how much surface area can you "repair" or replace before you have to abide by the new code and essentially tear off everything down to the rafters.

It would be nice to see creative roofing repair places and manufacturers come up with some kind of a granule rejuvination system for composition roofs to extend their life.

My plan is to replace my composition roof with a standing seam metal roof in the next few years. I'll probably do it myself and hope the law/code changes before then so I don't have to tear off the decking and apply the hurricane straps. I would guess this would involve several inspections and potential delays for the DIY homeowner too.

ToolGuy 01-02-2008 06:16 AM

"No sir, mr. inspector. I didn't replace it, I repaired ALL of it!" :p

CraigFL 01-02-2008 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ToolGuy (Post 13752)
"No sir, mr. inspector. I didn't replace it, I repaired ALL of it!" :p


Except of course for the ridge vent... ;)

And maybe that would get you by.:D

glennjanie 01-02-2008 12:43 PM

Hey Craig:
I like the standing seam roof idea. I know of several that are over 100 years old and still looking good. Of course, they do need some paint occasionally unless you use galvalume metal. We have lots of galvalume in Kentucky at rest stops and state parks. I know some of it is over 40 years old and still looks good; maybe not as shinny as at first but still no rust.
Glenn

Chief Mickey 04-23-2008 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CraigFL (Post 13703)
Here in Florida, our legislatures had a better idea:rolleyes: ... In order to appease the homeowners insurance lobby and in an effort to reduce rates(which are skyhigh here because of the hurricane situation), new reroofing laws were placed into effect for this year. It used to be that you could just put a new roof on and were allowed to roof over one layer. Now they have added many additional requirements to the code which requires you to do specific things during a reroof job for homes built before 2002. Some of which are:

1. Requirement to seal all deck material butt joint
2. Requirement to fasten all decking down more securely
3. Require waterproof membrane layer over decking
(and now for the really bad ones...)
4. Tear off decking around perimeter and install special hurricane retraints fastening roof trusses to top plates.
5. Special gable end structural support.

Now, the legislature did consider the cost of applying #4 and #5 because they have limited the cost to the consumer for that portion to be no more than $15,000 (plus the regular reroofing cost of #1, #2 & #3).

So the bottom line is that a reroof job for a house that would have previously cost $12,000 will now cost over $30,000 causing a major financial crisis for most homeowners. I'm not sure how long or if this will stay in effect but in the meantime I predict a big surge in the roofing REPAIR business because roofing repairs are not covered by the new rules.

My question is: What new, innovative roofing repairs are available out there to extend the life of a homeowners roof?

There is the 15% rule. It states in a HVHZ (high velocity Hurricane Zone) If the home is valued under $300,000.00 you just reroof the home using the new nail pattern and 8 ring shank nails and the sealing of all butt joints with peel and seal and felt overlaying the OSB. If the home is valued at $300,000.00 or more using the insurance value or the property appraisers assessed value then you take the cost of the reroof and the homeowner must contribute 15% of that amount by installing hurricane clips and strapping. If the cost exceeds $1,500.00 (hundred, not thousand) then the home is considered in compliance with the code and the homeowner just reroofs the home in accordance with the home I described above. This is if the home was built prior to the 2003 building code in effect.

You still must comply with tearing off all the shingles and having an inspector look at the 6 " OC nail pattern up each and every rafter (assuming they are on 24"OC) and sealing of the joints.

If the building contractors did their job correctly in the first place and stayed on the job as they should, we would not have all these failed roofs!

Kind regards,

Mickey

wkc570 07-28-2012 10:14 AM

what date did it become mannditory for hurricane straps?

fnoble 04-08-2013 08:28 AM

I would like to reroof a storage building with metal using wood purlens over the top of my excisting shingles.
an this be done?


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