DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Roofing and Siding > "Laminate" shingles




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Old 04-23-2010, 01:57 AM  
oldognewtrick
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You have 3 anchor points on a shingle, you place a nail in the center and that also catches the top edge of the bottom course of shingle. So you end up with the shingle nailed at the top, middle and the seal strip secures the bottom. If you compromise this nailing pattern you loose the ability to stabilize the shingle as it ages because it will shrink.

Stair casing a shingle installation gives a better color blend and you wont see the zipper line of installing on a vertical rack. With this installation you have to pick up the tab every other course to get the 4th nail in, it usually doesn't happen. When you staircase you always have a full shingle showing and it will get the nails placed in the proper location if you can see them. 3 nailing and high nailing account for more roof failures than any other reason. More roof are installed incorrectly than right.

If you look on the bundle of shingles the installation instructions are there, written in English and Spanish ( I don't know about Canadian tho)



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Old 04-23-2010, 02:04 AM  
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To many nails is not better because you stand a greater chance of getting a nail head where the shingles butt together on the next course above. On Mansard installations specs also call for hand sealing with dollops of roof cement on each shingle.

You also want your fastener to penetrate the wood decking of plywood and to go at least 3/4 of the way through dimensional lumber (1X6)



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Old 04-23-2010, 11:40 PM  
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I had a tenant move out yesterday, and I'm going to be busy until the end of this month getting that suite ready for the next tenant moving in. I've also got another tenant moving in to an empty suite at the end of this month as well. But, after the end of the month, I should have more time to devote to this and learn more about it. I will probably going to be asking more questions then.

Until then, I'm going to be spending the next coupla days painting acrylic sealer on bathroom ceramic tiling grout lines.

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Old 05-15-2010, 09:50 PM  
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The easiest way to get a sunburn in Winnipeg, Manitoba is to spend a few days up on a garage roof helping a guy replace shingles.

My sister works as a social worker in a nursing home, and one of the patients there has a son who does handyman work, including shingling roofs. She met the guy because he would come in periodically to visit his dad, and my sister would explain medical procedures and things to him, and why they were being done. Since a garage roof is about as simple a roof as you can get, we thought we'd go with him since it wasn't a difficult project, and anyone with roofing experience could do a garage roof.

Basically, he stripped all the shingles off with a roofing shovel, and it was my job to toss the old shingles off the roof into a pile, and then sweep the roof clean of debris with a push broom. We found some rotted wood which we replaced, and then we covered the whole roof with tarpaper.

We installed BP "Harmony" laminate shingles (30 year), but we also got two bundles of 3 tab shingles which I was in charge of cutting up. I cut three inches off the tabs for the starter strips on each side of the garage. Also, I cut 18 three tab shingles into "tabs" to do the peak of the roof.

The guy that did the roofing started the first course along the eve with a full shingle, then the next course was started with an 8 inch wide shingle, the third course with a 16 inch wide, then a 24 inch wide, then a 32 inch wide and finally the 6th course was started with a full shingle again. My job was to cut the bundles open and toss the shingles more or less into place, and he would position them and nail them in with a pneumatic nail gun. The work actually went pretty fast, but he was continuously running out of nails, and we were always stopping to put more coil nails into his Bostick nail gun.

When we got to the top of the roof, the "stick down strips" on the top row of shingles was about 3 inches below where they needed to be for the "tab" shingles that ran along the peak of the roof to cover. So, he basically draped a laminate shingle over the peak of the roof from one side, and then did the same thing from the other side, and cut the top edge off that second run of shingles, and finally nailed the "tab" shingles over the peak of the roof so that we had quite a thickness of shingles right on that peak.

So, all the shingling is done now, and on Monday I'll be phoning U-Haul to ask about the price of renting a trailer or half ton truck to haul the shingles away. There are two places here in Winnipeg where they "recycle" roofing shingles. Both places have a machine that costs about a half million dollars. That machine grinds the old shingles and debris up, separates out the nails and mixes what's left with asphalt, and keeps that mixture hot. The City and Province then buy that mixture to pave roads with. Apparantly, the ceramic granules on shingles are harder and more durable than the limestone that was being used for this purpose, and so paving asphalt made from recycled shingles actually lasts longer than paving asphalt made with limestone as the aggregate.

The guy that did my sister's roof also put metal drip edge along the sloped "rake" edges of the roof both at the front and back of the garage. Overall, I figure it was a pretty good roofing job. He charges $30 per hour for his labour, and he doesn't make any profit off the materials he buys, but he also keeps any leftover materials. In our case, we had a half roll of tarpaper and a half length of metal drip edge left over.

So, all's well that ends well. I was scared I was going to fall off the roof because it was about a 3.45 in 12 slope. That's not really steep, but it's steep enough that you have to be careful in your movements. And, now I have a bit of a sunburn, too.

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Old 05-16-2010, 06:10 AM  
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Roofins fun, isn't it? Glad you had a good time. Recycling of old shingles has just started in some spots in the USA and I think its a great alternative to dumping old shingles in the land fill.

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Old 05-16-2010, 06:18 AM  
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Nice job helpin out Nestor...but you left out the part about haulin shingles up the ladder. That's the really fun part.

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Old 05-16-2010, 11:45 AM  
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Quote:
Roofins fun, isn't it?
Honestly, it really wears a person down. The job took 3 days altogether, but that includes one day where all we did was replaced rotted chipboard roof decking. The continuous heat from the Sun, and always having the muscles in your legs tensed up because you're standing on a slope, and the tile "stick down strips" causing the shingles to stick to each other and your shoes if you stepped on it, it all kinda works to wear you down. By the end of the third day, I'd had enough. I coulda put in another day or two, but I was glad to be out of the Sun. I expect it's even worse down in the US because your Sun is higher in the sky so it's more intense sunlight, and you also have higher humidity during the summer.

Quote:
but you left out the part about haulin shingles up the ladder.
Well, yeah, I guess a person COULD carry bundles of shingles up a ladder onto a roof, but I can't think of anyone who'd want to do something like that. Oh, wait, yes I can! It'd be the same people that wrestle aligators just for fun, or the people that cut a big hole in the ice in the winter to go swimming. I expect some of those people would take a keen interest in the opportunity to carry 80 pound bundles of shingles up a ladder onto a roof. And hey, if you make the ladder unstable so there's a heightened risk of falling, I bet that would make it irresistable to them.

Thank God for rooftop shingle delivery.

I'm glad we went with the laminated shingles. On a hot day, like we had, the 3 tab shingles have an inherant weakness; they have two deep notches in them! When it's hot outside and the asphalt they're made of gets soft (but the shingle doesn't get any lighter in weight) then 3 tab shingles start to tear at the ends of those notches.

Laminated shingles don't have those inherant weak spots, and so they don't tear when you're handling them. Once they're nailed down on the roof, then I guess it wouldn't make a difference, but it seems blindingly obvious to me now why roofing contractors prefer laminated shingles; you can handle them without them tearing on a hot day.

Which, of course, begs the question: Why do they even have "tabs" on 3 tab shingles? It must cost the manufacturers like IKO and BP something to put those deep notches into the shingles to make them into "3 tab" shingles. Why do that? Why not make shingles WITHOUT those notches so the whole shingle is a single tab. Then, you could handle the shingles without them tearing. What am I missing here? Why pay extra to weaken the shingle before selling it to the customer?


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