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Old 06-05-2006, 07:11 PM  
Mudball
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Those are some interesting concepts. Now to talk to a roofer who would be willing to talk about doing something different from what theyve been doing
Thanks for all the help



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Old 07-02-2006, 11:09 AM  
k.baker
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Default snow load

the 1x4 purlins would work fine as long as snow loads are taken into consideration.in the northern part of the country putting 1x4 or 1x3 purlins was commonly done under slate roofs at around 12" on center this provided enough deck rigidity and controlled deflection under load. depending on were you live i would stretch this out to no more than 16" for corrugated metal roofing.i am a metal roofing contractor located in the central pa area.i have been involved in the metal roofing industry for about 11 years.since then i have fabricated many different applications of metal roofs. these have been anything from affordable mobile home re-roofing projects to beautiful barn roof resterations and also to high profile standing seam roof fabrication projects like 7 springs skier services center in somerset,pa. the metal i use comes in 12 beautiful colors and is covered by a 25 year paint performance warranty. underneath this paint is a substrate with a 20 year corroision warranty. email:keithbaker1@earthlink.net or phone: (814)224~4268.thanks,keith.



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Old 10-01-2006, 01:26 PM  
maintbabe
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Default Metal Roofing Install

Gibralter Products (SEMCO) will give you all the info you want to verify what your contractor is telling you. call'em 800 690 7235 (they are in FL)

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Old 07-13-2007, 01:01 PM  
dfw_lr
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Default Radiant barrier & bubble insulation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Square Eye View Post
Part of the reason I'm confused is that, the radiant barrier type of bubble wrap used here, has foil on both sides.

Radiant Barrier (bubble wrap) does not have an R-value because it's intended purpose is to slow radiant heat and is not intended to reduce conducted heat. Although it may actually have a low R-value, R-values apply to conducted heat and would be misleading when comparing radiant barriers. The air gap that is mentioned in your link is intended to separate the the radiant barrier from the regular insulation. The radiant barrier is still a vapor barrier, so it needs to be directly against the metal. Then an air gap, then the fiberglass insulation or foam panels can be used...


Actually the bubble wrap does have an R-Value. It's the radiant barrier by itself that doesn't. R Values are tested using what is called a Hot Box Test. Basically, an insulating material is put in the hot box with a heat lamp above it, and the time it takes to resist the heat is quantified as the R value. A plain radiant barrier (without bubble insulation) is an R 0, because, even though it blocks 97% of the heat, the 3% gets through instantly. That's why radiant barrier companies came out with adding insulating material. The bubble material in 5/32", for example, is about an R 8. Then foil is wrapped around it and it's put in the Hot Box. The hot box registers it as an R 14.9, because the bubble insulation was only under 3% of the heat load. Thus, the radiant barrier bubble insulation has a certified 14.9 R-Value in 5/32". This R-Value per dimentional thickness is even better than aviation grade foam.

To put this under a roof and over the decking, you could use this as a vapor or moisture barrier instead of felt or tar paper. Then, if you wanted to, you could stop there and add the metal roof with about an R 8. However, if you just add furring strips before putting on the metal roof, you'll also have all the benifits of the radiant barrier.

I hope this helps.

http://www.radiantbarrier.com/tempshield_single_bubble_double_.htm
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Old 09-26-2007, 02:56 PM  
travelover
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Originally Posted by Kathleen H View Post
Hi there all, since the topic is about Metal Roofing, you might want to check out this site which contains tons of information regarding the different types of Metal Roofing available. Hope it helps.

Kathleen H
Guide To Residential Metal Roofing

SPAM


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