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-   -   Roof / Attic Mold (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f34/roof-attic-mold-8245/)

am3rican 12-29-2009 07:52 PM

Roof / Attic Mold
 
We purchased a house this April in Pennsylvania. We hired a reputable inspection firm to do the inspection. We purchased the house, mainly because it needed relatively little work. In fact, the inspector mentioned the roof was relatively new and was, by his estimate, less than 5 years old. However, several weeks ago we noticed water stains and water dripping from our master bathroom. The roofer we hired to fix the leak cut out 2 5x5 sections of the roof. It was discovered that the plywood under the shingles were covered in mold. Furthermore, he mentioned that while the shingles were new, the plywood was warped, discolored, and cracked namely because poor ventilation had caused the plywood to warp and crack from heat.

I have never sued anyone but feel the inspection company should have discovered that the plywood under the shingles was visibly warped, cracked, discolored, and festered with mold. The inspector did climb into the attic, but only enough to poke is head up there. I also have a sneaking suspicion the seller of the house failed to disclose this because there's obvious evidence in the master bathroom, where it has been leaking, that the ceiling had been patched in several place. At this point, the roofer is quoting me $9000 to replace the plywood and shingles. Do I have any legal recourse? What should I, as the homeowner, do in order to prevent the mold from spreading?

I have a ridge vent running the length of the roof. 2 foot soffits on either side of the house and a gable vent. I can't see how ventilation is a problem but according to the roofer it is.

PostSidingLLC 12-30-2009 12:55 PM

Attic ventilation
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by am3rican (Post 38197)
We purchased a house this April in Pennsylvania. We hired a reputable inspection firm to do the inspection. We purchased the house, mainly because it needed relatively little work. In fact, the inspector mentioned the roof was relatively new and was, by his estimate, less than 5 years old. However, several weeks ago we noticed water stains and water dripping from our master bathroom. The roofer we hired to fix the leak cut out 2 5x5 sections of the roof. It was discovered that the plywood under the shingles were covered in mold. Furthermore, he mentioned that while the shingles were new, the plywood was warped, discolored, and cracked namely because poor ventilation had caused the plywood to warp and crack from heat.

I have never sued anyone but feel the inspection company should have discovered that the plywood under the shingles was visibly warped, cracked, discolored, and festered with mold. The inspector did climb into the attic, but only enough to poke is head up there. I also have a sneaking suspicion the seller of the house failed to disclose this because there's obvious evidence in the master bathroom, where it has been leaking, that the ceiling had been patched in several place. At this point, the roofer is quoting me $9000 to replace the plywood and shingles. Do I have any legal recourse? What should I, as the homeowner, do in order to prevent the mold from spreading?

I have a ridge vent running the length of the roof. 2 foot soffits on either side of the house and a gable vent. I can't see how ventilation is a problem but according to the roofer it is.

Even though you have ridge vents, make sure that your 2' soffit overhangs have a ventilation slot cut continuously from end to end (or spaced vents), and that ceiling insulation installed in the joists is not blocking airflow into the roof rafter bays. This provides an air "intake" to the attic and the "exhaust" is through the ridge vent. Ridge vents only work to their full design when they have an intake at the bottom edge of the roof slope.

Most home inspectors usually have so many disclaimers in their reports that any "recourse" is nil. When buying any existing home I always recommend that the roof and the attic be inspected by a professional roofer. Most home inspectors are notoriously weak in their knowledge in this area, and just give it a "quick look".
Ron

stevensonjames88 01-02-2010 05:46 AM

The best thing would be have a good ventilation in that area. Although it would a bit easy to take out the mold, the problem would be how to totally eradicate them since they would grow again with the presence of moisture.

GBR 01-02-2010 08:35 PM

As mentioned, you need a balanced ventilation system.
1. figure your square footage and divide by either 1/100, best; 1/150, minimum per code, or 1/300 (with a vapor barrier in attic facing heat). Air Vent: Continuous Soffit Vents Specifications
2. Compare vent styles to brand name for math figures; ridge vent-NFVA sq.in.per foot, soffit vent types and NFVA per each unit or footage. http://www.fureyco.com/content/image...ng_The_Air.pdf
3. The gable vent is short-circuiting the ridge vent causing the soffit vents harm: Audel Complete Building Construction - Google Books
4. The soffit vents (intake) should be close to 9 sq.in. per ft. x each house side = 18, which should equal the sq.in. of ridge vents (exhaust). The gable vent should be plugged. I presume the mold was below or close to the gable vent (same end of house)? Do the math and reply back on how much you have.... Check for this: BlockTheHeat.com -Attic Ventilation Problems The best way is from the attic looking for clear soffit vents, one in each bay between rafters. No insulation interfering with air path to ridge, hopefully baffles installed and blocking against wind-washing the insulation over the outside walls. Pictures would be nice from inside attic area.

Be safe, Gary

kok328 01-03-2010 08:16 PM

Make sure that your bathroom exhaust fans exhaust through the roof and not to the soffit. The moist air can be sucked back in through the soffit and cause mold.
As far as recourse, the home inspector might have an E&O clause (errors and omissions).
You have to be able to prove that the seller had knowledge of this condition but, failed to disclose. This is very difficult to prove. Your best bet is if you purchased or were provided a home warranty but, this may also not be covered.


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