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Old 01-25-2014, 06:21 PM  
oldognewtrick
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Roofing guns and framing guns are two different tools. Roofing guns use nails in a coil and framing guns use longer nails in a sleeve. They are not interchangeable.

If you have never done something of this magnitude, I would suggest finding a friend who is a contractor, or a framer friend or someone who works in the trade. It's great you want to DIY, but the potential for having catastrophic failure is great if you don't know have the knowledge to manage something of this scope. An engineer would be a good place to start. You have a lot of things to think about, like wind load, live load, load points etc. Just my



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Old 01-25-2014, 07:20 PM  
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I know a hand full of roofers ( commercial guys but I know they do residential roofs on the side , I helped on a tear off once ....thats work! ) who will help me and my good friend was a framing carpenter for years. My help isn't going to be a few suits selling insurance . All journeyman tradesman.
I'm personally a union sheetmetal worker. I'm a foreman for about 6-7 years about 20 yrs in the trade. I install mechanical systems on a commercial level . My field is more air handlers , roof top units , structurial steel , welding , job site coordination between trades. I personally don't see much wood. It's seems pretty straight forward so far really. My house is just a rectangle , I need to build a couple walls and set trusses. But I don't under estimate anybody's trade and my lack of knowledge. I'd like to educate my self as much as possiable . It's the little things ya know? And I know therea a ton of them because I learn something new every job after 20 years.

I guess my intension is to draft up my plans and have them stamped by an architect.



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Old 01-26-2014, 01:59 AM  
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I've seen so many projects over the years where homeowners watch these 30 minute TV shows and think, hey I can do that stuff and it turns out to be a ...well, you know what.

Sounds like you have a nice project you're planning, just don't forget to add at least a third or more to the $$$ and timeline budget you estimate it to be.

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Old 01-27-2014, 05:42 PM  
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Stanley bostich makes framing nailers that are resonable to bay and easily sold when your done. You can get them in a strip or stick nailer or a coil style, neither shoot roofing nails. I think HD and others rent these. Stick nailer is handier as you can carry extra nails with you when climbing around trusses.
I like having a chop saw like your friend has, on the job, you do have to build a table for it and it can be a little awkward on the site. Most framers here just use a skill saws but I like to keep body parts attached so I use the chop saw when I can.

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Old 01-28-2014, 07:20 PM  
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Oldog made some good points about it being a big job. It's great that you have a friend that was a framer but all framers are not created equal. Is it his intention to teach you before hand, some help while you do it or take charge of the job. Will you have someone who can walk walls to stand trusses?

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Old 01-28-2014, 08:08 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
Oldog made some good points about it being a big job. It's great that you have a friend that was a framer but all framers are not created equal. Is it his intention to teach you before hand, some help while you do it or take charge of the job. Will you have someone who can walk walls to stand trusses?
My friend is no journeyman at it , I'm sure by his own admission. I am hopfully going to meet up with another carpentar friend Friday and go over some things . I know some others too , more acuantices . I wouldn't be opposed to hiring an expert in to run all of us around a weekend . Walking walls...prob not , tbh I'm stuck on the lull idea .I rig with these things all the time , I could pick your nose with one. A crane is basically not an option for me.

Some thoughts I'm unsure of

Does the first truss sit flush with the outside wall?
What's a good process for plumbing the first truss , and for.that matter the rest?
I have to price trusses out yet. What pitch is best?
When you guys set rafters you make that notch to sit on the wall , how does it work with trusses?

I know I don't have all the answers or know how. I have a lot of time . That's why I'm here . I appreciate your guys help.
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Old 01-28-2014, 09:35 PM  
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We don't use a crane to stand trusses, just to have them delievered to the top of the house. Some have them delievered and leave them standing in a package. We have them layed down. On a house like yours we would have a package landed and layed down toward the center at each end. The gable truss is different from the rest and would be on top of each pile. This allows you to sheet the gable and add the look outs and drywall backing before you stand it up. As soon as it is up, reasonable plumb, a long 2x4 braceis placed near the top and streached back to an outside wall leaving room that it won't be in the way of aother trusses being stude. It is placed so the sheeting is inline with the sheeting of the house, this will required some one to stand on the wall and see that it is line up while someone nails it in place.
The seat cut is built into trusses not cut out. It is the end of the 2x4 that would be the ceiling part of the truss, they should fit to the outside of the sheeting front and back of the house, good luck with that. As they never fit you pick either front or back and make sure every truss fit the same along that wall. That does mean you need a straight and firmly braced wall.
Two 3" nails in each end to the top of the exterior wall do not nail it to interior walls untill after the catwalk is in, last. Carefull layout is very important as per instruction that come with the trusses
To hold trusses straight on layout a 1/4 is add across the top about half way up the slope, level and on the exact layout that is on the wall, front and back. these are temp so you nail one 3" hand nail in every truss, nail left up just enough to pull them later. they stay in place until they are in the way for the next piece of sheeting.
Let the questions begin.
I can't see how you could do this with out some one walking the walls.
If you think that is scary, the liner is the 2x4 that goes on the tales of the trusses usually about 20 or 24" outside the exterior wall althow this could likely be done off your forklift.

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Old 01-29-2014, 06:27 AM  
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All the power equipment is a plus in getting things up on the roof. It always seems the projects I get involved with are limited on equipment and also manpower. If you find yourself trying to move and set trusses with two or three guys and no equipment you will be doing it like most of the DIY community. I have a few tips if you get forced into doing it with the elbow grease method.

The way I have always done them is carry and set them upside down (point down) gravity works in your favor that way. Before we get them up there have their locations already marked on both sides on the top of the wall and ahead of time we made up a bunch of sticks out of 1x2’s for our spacing with two nails started at 16” or 24” depending on your center distance these are placed a few places along the top of the truss to hold them to the one next to it until you get to the sheathing.

When we go to flip the truss up we attached a pole with a rope to the center of the truss pointing straight up with the rope attached to the high end of the pole two screws work well for this. Get the truss as close where it’s needed before flipping leaving room for it to flip. Now the guy in the center pulls on the rope and the truss turns over very easy and the guy in the center holds the pole to keep it upright and stable. He can lift on the pole and the other guy or guys can walk it down into place. Nail it into the wall and attach your sticks while checking center distance remove your pole and repeat. When you get close to the end you will have to flip and shuffle a few as you run out of room for your pole to do them one at a time, by then you will have something sturdy to lean them against.

I have set them alone with this method using a weight I hang on the pole after I flip them and walk them down using a step ladder going a little at a time end to end.

Leave the sticks on right until you nail your plywood. I don’t drive the nails for the sticks down and you just pull and toss the sticks as you go. The trusses can be knocked over a smidgen here and there as you go as they may have a little bow in them.

Like I said in the beginning a crane is nice but not always in the budget. Several buildings I have made we made our own trusses so the delivery thing for free wasn’t there also. Sometimes where a building is located you can’t get back to it with equipment etc.

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Old 01-29-2014, 07:31 AM  
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Bud; with houses you have walls in the building that don't allow the flip. It's not usually bad for the guy walking the center, some time you have to build something to walk on. It's the guys on the end that have scary job. Sometimes we see lower scafolding put in for them. The whole thing can be like a house of cards and can easily fall over.

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Old 01-29-2014, 08:00 AM  
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Good point. I haven’t done one by hand off the end of the building but have seen others do that. They run the top plate long off the end and then hang them upside down flip them one at a time and walk them down.

House of cards is very correct and why I like to use the straps as I go. Sometimes I see long straps spanning several trusses but when you take one of those off you have several loose trusses. I have seen some people use a 2X inside the truss to hold them but once you nail that in if your truss is bowed it’s hard to get it over to fall on the center of the end of a sheet.

I guess that’s why the old timers like my dad built stick construction he never had a helper.

I’m curious to hear how Neil and the other pros feel about Hurricane strapping trusses and or stick built even when code doesn’t require it. I personally think for the little cost and time involved it’s a good thing to do.



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