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-   -   circular saw blades for general demolition? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f37/circular-saw-blades-general-demolition-1483/)

Quattro 10-17-2006 09:22 AM

circular saw blades for general demolition?
 
I have a Skillsaw that I would like to employ for cutting through sections of vinyl flooring, underlayment, and staples. Is there a blade that will hold up to this?

My kitchen floor has 2 layers of vinyl (subfloor, underlayment stapled to it, vinyl on that, underlayment stapled to it, vinyl over that), and I need to be able to pull up sections of it at a time, since we are still using the kitchen on a daily basis, and this way I can get the pieces in the back of my pickup to haul to the dump.

I haven't really gone looking for a blade that will do this, but I like the idea of just setting the depth on my saw to 3/8" or so, and cutting sections out to be pulled up.

I'm just full of questions! :)

Square Eye 10-17-2006 09:27 AM

Carbide teeth, 10 to 24 tooth blade, construction blade.

Would not recommend, plywood/paneling blades, anything not carbide, more than 24 tooth, thin kerf.

The cheap Black and Decker, Skil, Vermont American.. They will be fine as long as they have carbide teeth. Buy 2 or 3, they are cheap.

CraigFL 10-17-2006 10:08 AM

I do the same thing with the cheap blades. You will be cutting thru everything including nails...

glennjanie 10-17-2006 09:09 PM

Hello Quattro:
Square-Eye is steering you right. The carbide teeth can stand an occasional nail or staple and usually doesn't get into the heat wobble that comes with the cheap-o blades. Caution: carbide toothed blades can throw a nail out at you or a tooth now and then (they are brazed to the blade and the brazing sometimes fails. I would wear safety glasses and a face mask.
Glenn

glennjanie 10-17-2006 09:12 PM

Oh yeah! The heat will make the vinyl floor melt to the blade, you should lubricate the blade with WD-40, Pam or something.
Glenn

Bridgewater 10-19-2006 04:22 PM

I always use the cheep Black&Decker Piranha 24carbide teeth for cutting into the unknowen! Its thick,cheep and will hold its shape.

Bridgewater 10-22-2006 10:08 PM

glennan-
You aint kidding man! about them safety glasses. Today I was finishing up a garage I was siding (side job) and was plugin up a window.
So im cutting back the wood siding so I can get a nailer for my OSB. I snap my lines and start to cut, KNOWING I was going to be hitting some nails, And start cutting going blind every 3 or 4 inches as my head is turned away, and thats when I got hit with a cut off nail right at eye level just were my eye would have been.
Well it drue a bit of blood on the side of my cheek, But I thanked God for that one!!!
Stuped me, I had saftey glasses just sitting on our hutch at home.They are in my truck now!!!!!!

Quattro 10-23-2006 08:17 AM

Awesome, thanks everyone. I saw an ad for $2.99 Pirahna blades...I'm there!

Hacksaw 05-03-2008 05:22 PM

Sounds like you might want to consider using a reciprocating saw to do some of that demo instead of a circular saw.


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