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-   -   Building Out or Building Up? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f45/building-out-building-up-4157/)

JulieC 05-07-2008 02:12 PM

Building Out or Building Up?
 
3 Attachment(s)

I have two plans I created for adding onto our 1970's 4-level split. Shown are renderings of the current house, the design with a 13'x10' addition to the front, and the design that builds up.

In both remodeling designs, the existing bathrooms, main floor (kitchen/living/dining) and existing staircases remain pretty much as is.

In the building out plan, the foundation is extended out 10' forward from the front two bedrooms (one on each floor), for a 260sf gain (130sf x 2)

In the building out plan, the footprint is unchanged. The roofs of the center and right sections are replaced, an interior staircase added to access the new over-garage and usable attic spaces. The area gained over the garage is 15'x24', and there is usable space in the attic, at least a nice bedroom's worth.

In both cases, the existing siding, roofing material and windows are to be replaced.

I am guessing ... totally, completely, guessing, that the costs of the two plans is about the same. Assuming similar fixtures and finishes, does anyone have an opinion about which costs less, or are they really about the same?


JulieC 05-07-2008 02:12 PM

Building Out or Building Up?
 
3 Attachment(s)

I have two plans I created for adding onto our 1970's 4-level split. Shown are renderings of the current house, the design with a 13'x10' addition to the front, and the design that builds up.

In both remodeling designs, the existing bathrooms, main floor (kitchen/living/dining) and existing staircases remain pretty much as is.

In the building out plan, the foundation is extended out 10' forward from the front two bedrooms (one on each floor), for a 260sf gain (130sf x 2)

In the building out plan, the footprint is unchanged. The roofs of the center and right sections are replaced, an interior staircase added to access the new over-garage and usable attic spaces. The area gained over the garage is 15'x24', and there is usable space in the attic, at least a nice bedroom's worth.

In both cases, the existing siding, roofing material and windows are to be replaced.

I am guessing ... totally, completely, guessing, that the costs of the two plans is about the same. Assuming similar fixtures and finishes, does anyone have an opinion about which costs less, or are they really about the same?


JulieC 05-07-2008 02:12 PM

Building Out or Building Up?
 
3 Attachment(s)

I have two plans I created for adding onto our 1970's 4-level split. Shown are renderings of the current house, the design with a 13'x10' addition to the front, and the design that builds up.

In both remodeling designs, the existing bathrooms, main floor (kitchen/living/dining) and existing staircases remain pretty much as is.

In the building out plan, the foundation is extended out 10' forward from the front two bedrooms (one on each floor), for a 260sf gain (130sf x 2)

In the building out plan, the footprint is unchanged. The roofs of the center and right sections are replaced, an interior staircase added to access the new over-garage and usable attic spaces. The area gained over the garage is 15'x24', and there is usable space in the attic, at least a nice bedroom's worth.

In both cases, the existing siding, roofing material and windows are to be replaced.

I am guessing ... totally, completely, guessing, that the costs of the two plans is about the same. Assuming similar fixtures and finishes, does anyone have an opinion about which costs less, or are they really about the same?


JulieC 05-08-2008 10:42 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Thanks, I will post back if/when we ever do this.

Handyguys, your numbers scare me! I do agree that spending too much (my target is $50-75k), it just isn't worth it. I have more details on the "out" version (slightly older version) here: http://www.mindcapers.com/remodel/, I came up with the "up" version recently, don't have it posted anywhere. I have a newer version of "out" that I was describing, the difference being it does not intrude on the garage space at all, but goes forward another 4'.

If I could do the out version for $26k, I'd jump on it. :lol While it is only a 260sf increase, it would completely change the livability of the house (info on the page linked above). Tearing down and starting over makes no sense is our area as there are lots of lots available, the real estate market here is going nowhere fast. Our current house/property (5 acres) is worth about $120k-150k more than available lots here. Our township and the adjoining areas require 2 acres minimum for a new house. The realty fee for selling our house would be about $15. We need to replace the roofing (guesstimate $7-10k) and siding (vinyl in bad condition anyway, guesstimate $10k) and probably windows ($5k) to stay or to sell. New construction around here for mid-range quality is about $100/sf.

I had been hoping that finding a way to keep the costs down, I thought these plans would do it by not touching existing plumbing, heating. Yes, additions do need heating, but these are both designed to have some passive solar heating (front is due south), and up would have a masonry stove in the new master suite. If that wouldn't be sufficient (say in the attic), radiant subfloor heating could be used. The only new plumbing in either plan is adjacent to existing plumbing and our fairly new (5 years old?) furnace could keep doing the good job it is in the existing house. Essentially, I left all the existing expensive stuff alone and the addition, with the exception of the master bath, is just basic space.

I "painted" the bathrooms obnoxiously different colors and took a cross-section snapshot to show where the only new plumbing would be on "up". The blue (lower-level, base elevation -37") and orange (current upper level, base elevation +5'7") bathrooms were redone 3 years ago. No changes to these needed. The green bathroom is the new master bath, base elevation 9'3". There is "dead space" (about 18") between the ceiling of the blue bathroom and the floor of the orange one, plus a bit of dead-space between the orange and green. I thought if it was all adjacent and the new was higher, a new tankless water heater for the master bath (old water heater would still service existing fixtures) would allow just cold water to and waste water back.

I hope this makes sense ... it is probably less complicated than it looks at first. Some smoke & mirrors to change the facade.


JulieC 05-16-2008 12:36 PM

The latest...
 
1 Attachment(s)

I have a couple different floor plans worked out, here is the front elevation. To the existing house ...

* "Enlarge" the middle section. Existing roof on this section can stay in place minus a dormer cutout. Add same pitch (4:12) roof at same elevation, narrower on front and back by about 2'. The "gable inside the gable" is the existing roof, the enclosing gable is the new.

* Drop garage ceiling to the left of the right side-load garage door/opener mechanism to 7'6" (as drawn, not that you can tell), or 7'0" (need to check code, would rather have those extra inches upstairs) all the way across (front-to-back). This creates a 22'x14' space for master suite.

* Interior, non-bearing wall work to create access stairs (31" or 25" difference, depending on height garage floor is dropped to, assuming 10" floor thickness) to new master suite.

Also, this drawing uses the existing siding, except on the front of the middle section and gable-end shingles. We found some extra siding in the garage attic, plus we should be able to salvage enough (won't take much) to do repairs (a few small holes, a little melted from idiot former owners' gas grill). Cultured stone accents would be new as would be the gable-end shingles.

I'm not looking for exact numbers, just "would cost more, less, same" type info.



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