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-   -   did work without a permit (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f45/did-work-without-permit-10043/)

jimod 10-04-2010 11:34 AM

did work without a permit
 
I know i should not have, but i built a new room without a permit. I was wondering if anyone knows if the way I built the floor would have any chance of passing code inspection.http://chaddsfordpc.com/images/100_3549.JPG I had a room that was 2 stories tall. I added 1x10 connected to the studs and then used joist hangers to frame the floor(see picture). Is there a process to have work inspected after the fact? would this possibly pass?

jimod 10-04-2010 12:09 PM

does this framing meet code
 
i build a floor in a 2 story loft area. I did not get a permit at the time. Could I get permit after the fact. can interior framing use joist hangers. the span is 11'. 2x10's were used. see image. http://chaddsfordpc.com/images/100_3549.JPG

TxBuilder 10-05-2010 12:06 PM

No clue, do you have any pics of the surrounding area?

remmons 10-06-2010 03:04 PM

A 2x10 spaced 16" on center, No. 2 Douglas fir, will span 14'0", where as the Douglas Fir #1 will span 15'0". I cannot answer your question that easily, you may have to talk to the building and zoning department, but you should be in good shape otherwise.

GBR 10-06-2010 05:16 PM

You forgot to remove the drywall behind the ledger board. (Required) The attachments to the studs may need engineering, more than just nails- yikes! You may need to add blocking along the side joist bays for shear flow. I suggest getting a permit now. A paper trail is good if you ever need your H.O.Insurance for a claim and you are liable if it ever fails under a future home sale. Heat, ventilation and natural light may be required. If a bedroom, egress window will be required. It may mess with your HVAC system if blocking or changing the original design of supply, return air, etc.

Gary

Gary

remmons 10-07-2010 07:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GBR (Post 49278)
You forgot to remove the drywall behind the ledger board. (Required) The attachments to the studs may need engineering, more than just nails- yikes! You may need to add blocking along the side joist bays for shear flow. I suggest getting a permit now. A paper trail is good if you ever need your H.O.Insurance for a claim and you are liable if it ever fails under a future home sale. Heat, ventilation and natural light may be required. If a bedroom, egress window will be required. It may mess with your HVAC system if blocking or changing the original design of supply, return air, etc.

Gary

Gary

...drywall behind the ledger. I should have caught that! I shouldn't have been in a hurry to respond.

Gary is correct on all accounts. A professional should have been consulted before you installed the floor joists. The Building and Zoning Dept. sor the City Offices, should be sending out an inspector, who would have informed you as to what will be required to safely and successfully complete your objective.

carnuck 10-07-2010 09:29 AM

There is a reason for permits. A house I owned and worked on, then sold (just before the bubble burst) was inspected and wasn't passed before the owner took over (he signed off on it as he was a contractor) Then something he did (an extension cord on an electric dryer!) caused a major fire and the Ins co wanted me to take the blame!
I would have been SOL if I hadn't done what I did and had a paper trail.

remmons 10-08-2010 09:03 AM

A lot of people fear the costs of obtaining a permit. Some are unaware, and others try to skip around them all together.

edh 10-09-2010 09:41 AM

All is not lost. Once you have your permit and know what is required, you will undoubtedly be able to salvage a lot of the material you used.
You just added more work for yourself.

profenx 10-10-2010 09:17 PM

I've heard of cities that would let you have something that was built permitted after. They would have to inspect it and you'll have to do the changes to bring it up to code. It could end up costing more than if you had just got the permits to start with, but at least you know it's up to code and permitted. Also, resale is much better. There has got to be rules that will allow you to have it permitted after. What about the houses with no permits for building structures or add ons that are sold? I think it's safer to go with permits especially for room additions and stuff that are obviously not part of the original house.


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