DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > General Home Improvement Discussion > Home needs leveled




Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-06-2013, 09:22 AM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Austin View Post
telling them that will change the price.
In a good way?

One book recommended you tell them you are getting multiple bids. I'm on the fence as to telling them. For sure, they don't like having to bid against others, but this is business.


__________________
Wuzzat? is offline  
jwest Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 11:17 AM  
bud16415
Fixer Upper
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Erie Pa, Pa
Posts: 1,233
Liked 352 Times on 282 Posts
Likes Given: 115

Default

On the topic of getting bids and most trade contractors will come and do some research and compute some number. The price they come up with may reflect also how bad they want the job at that time.

I had called 5 roofing companies to come price a roof on my old house. They all came within 15 minutes of the time they set up and the first 4 showed up in a car and dressed like they were going to play golf. They took a few pictures measured the base of the house at ground level and gave me a bid on a special bid form with terms. They were all within 10%. The last guy never showed up on time and pulled in an hour and a half late after dark in a pickup truck with ladder racks and full of junk he was about 65 and covered in dirt and apologized for being late. He drug a 30’ wooden ladder off the truck and declined help to set it up. He was on the roof for 30 minutes and came down and said let me guess you are getting prices around X dollars and he was right on the mark. He then said you have plank roofing with spaces in it and ventilation is poor, you have 3 bad boards over in this corner and the whole roof needs to be taken down to bare sheathing replaced where bad with rough sawed 1 x like what’s up there and then sheathed over with OSB. papered and ice guard new vents and soffits opened to let air in. He said gutters are shot and if it was his house he would build out the rafter tails to make the overhang correct and give the gutters something to hold to and redo soffits and fascia. He also commented on failing flashing and asked how bad the damage looked inside. He was right. How he knew that in the dark without a light I still don’t know. He said what do you think and I said I want ½ four-ply instead of the OSB and he said man that’s going to cost ya. And he told me an exact number, and then told me plywood was going up in a week so he had to order it in the morning if that’s what I wanted. I told him he had the job and he said don’t you want to know the price? I said yes tell me the wife will want to know. His crew did a beautiful job and I have got him a dozen jobs over the years.

The point is the bid process is about way more than finding the low bid. It’s an opportunity to feel out who you are getting also and learn as you go. When I told him he was the only one to actually get on the roof he just laughed and asked me if I had any paper he could write my bid on.



__________________
bud16415 is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 11:30 AM  
Speedbump
Water well etc.
 
Speedbump's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Riverview, Fl.
Posts: 428
Liked 22 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

That's a good story. It kind of goes along with the statement: Never hire the guy with the full page ad in the Phone Book.

__________________
FAQ's
Speedbump is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 03:39 PM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

I'm assuming you got good value for your money, but where did his bid fall relative to the others?

BTW, most contracts say "furnish & install". I don't know that I've ever seen one that said "We will solve your problem."

__________________
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 05:58 PM  
jwest
Junior Member
 
jwest's Avatar
Projects
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Seneca, MO
Posts: 6
Likes Given: 5

Default

1300 square feet on the bottom (it's a 2 story). Figures about $5.00 a square ft.

__________________
jwest is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2013, 06:55 PM  
Wuzzat?
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 2,328
Liked 167 Times on 154 Posts
Likes Given: 94

Default

Thanks, that makes 9 hopefully representative samples. Above 30 is considered to be a 'large sample'.

sq ft cost ratio, $/sq. ft.
1400 $1,400 1.00
700 $1,200 1.71
1100 $2,250 2.05
1100 $2,500 2.27
1000 $4,000 4.00
2600 $13,000 5.00
1300 $6,500 5.00
1300 $7,440 5.72
1100 $7,500 6.82

9 =number of samples
$3.73 =avg.
$4.00 =median
0.80 =correlation coefficient between cost and size: not bad

for houses between
700 and
2600 sq. ft.

Half cost between
$2.05 and
$5.00 per sq. ft.

almost all cost between
$1.00 and
$6.82 per sq. ft.

$5 is kinda high so I'd guess the median income for your ZIPcode is above the $50K US avg.

If you graph cost vs. size, the $1.00/sq. ft. is visually an outlier at least in this group of few samples and if it's removed the correlation goes to 0.89.

__________________

Last edited by Wuzzat?; 02-06-2013 at 07:07 PM.
Wuzzat? is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-07-2013, 09:26 PM  
jwest
Junior Member
 
jwest's Avatar
Projects
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Seneca, MO
Posts: 6
Likes Given: 5

Default

I got a third person today, old friend who was in the business for years. After going over everything with him I am thinking of just putting new post and pillars next to the ones there, adding a few more and leaving well enough alone. The floor will still be bowed but better than messing something else up to fix it. As long as it is solid and stable, that is the main thing. It's an old house and there will be imperfections. Have heard some horror stories about people doing it wrong.

__________________

Last edited by jwest; 02-07-2013 at 09:28 PM.
jwest is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-08-2013, 04:37 AM  
bud16415
Fixer Upper
 
bud16415's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Erie Pa, Pa
Posts: 1,233
Liked 352 Times on 282 Posts
Likes Given: 115

Default

It’s good to hear you found a friend with experience to look it over. You have to think what a 116 years of sitting in one place and all the mass of a house and heating and cooling cycles working on the building will do. Most of these old gals were made from material cut and hauled within a few miles from where they now sit. Lots of it was semi dried before use and some was shaped with a broad ax right on the site. Basements were dug by hand or with the help of a horse.

As you go thru remodeling and repairing the house you will find many things that are far different than today’s way of doing it. One thing that always amazes me is when I drill or cut the century old yellow pine the sap and pitch in it warms up and becomes sticky again and smells just like a fresh cut Christmas tree.

You will be doing a lot of shimming and trimming as you do things in the house. I built a kitchen island and when I installed it made me feel like the ship was rolling over. I ended up raising one end a 1/2 inch at the base and another half below the counter top. Making the adjustment at two points made it look and feel like it had been there for a century.

The main thing is that you feel the house is stable and not actively changing.

__________________
bud16415 is offline  
jwest Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-19-2013, 11:00 AM  
Jungle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 332
Liked 28 Times on 25 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

Keep in mind there is structural levelling and aesthetic levelling.
Even of they put in good footers, your beams may need to be doubled up with sister joists. Some people may just put concerte leveller over it to make it look straight.
Usually sagging is caused by water damage or even rot.
How does your roof look? Once the main floor sinks then the second then your roof. So check your ceiling and your flooring and roof, the problem maybe bigger than you thought to completely fix.
I do believe it is better to level structurally as best as you can, sagging will cause continuing structural imbalance or roof sag. A level house is a structurally sound house.

They should provide written estimate with detailed of everything they are planning to be doing.



__________________
Jungle is offline  
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Mobile home cheapest way to get a home? bryce General Home Improvement Discussion 7 05-30-2012 09:44 AM
Decorate Your Home With Kitchen Home Appliances EmaRich General Home Improvement Discussion 0 05-24-2011 10:26 PM
Home inspections and Home Appraisal Same thing? Evil Scotsman General Home Improvement Discussion 6 04-26-2010 10:46 AM
Home Sweet Home jump2top08 Introductions 1 03-31-2008 12:13 AM