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-   -   How safe are you when doing house repair? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f45/how-safe-you-when-doing-house-repair-14816/)

ownerbuilder2012 09-27-2012 08:18 PM

How safe are you when doing house repair?
 
Hi everyone,

There's no doubt that you've done a couple of house repair, but how do you keep it safe?

How do you keep your work safe?

nealtw 09-27-2012 09:02 PM

Read the books, watch the videos and ask questions. So you have some idea what to expect before you start ripping and taring. And keep a broom in the left hand to keep the work area clean.

ownerbuilder2012 09-27-2012 09:31 PM

I agree with this, every home repair is different from the other, and also requires different safety procedures.

drewdin 09-28-2012 09:51 AM

pay attention to what you are doing, measure twice and cut once, if your not sure about something stop and find out how, dont just guess. People laugh at me but I wear standard PPE depending on what Im doing, steel toe, hard hat, glasses and respirator if its dusty/ insulation work. I plan on enjoying the house when im done

Wuzzat? 09-28-2012 10:55 AM

Not in any particular order:

Think of as many ways to do a task as you can. If there is a tool that allows you yet another way, get it. After a while this thought process will become automatic.

Avoid a fall of over 14' at all costs.

Get accounts of accidents from OSHA and try to figure out all the wrong assumptions the injured person made. Foreseen is forewarned is forearmed.

Understand basic physics so you have some idea of forces and the directions of those forces. If a car weighs 3000# and has a front:rear weight distribution of 60:40 you should know what each tire is carrying.
Understand Center of Gravity.

Lift weights so you are better able to control power and hand tools.

Do not endanger or injure bystanders because it will make you unpopular.

People who feel guilty, and masochists, may be accident-prone; if you ruminate about couldas, wouldas and shouldas, be careful.

It is possible to scratch your cornea even if you wear glasses.

As safety increases, productivity decreases. This is a zero-sum-game that labor and management play every day.

If you want to see some of your bones without the benefit of an X-ray you can use a table saw with the guard removed.

As to hand injuries,
-degloving
-shotgun wound to the palm
and
-cement mixers
are all pretty effective.

The risks and consequences vary depending on your age.

For a legal angle on this, search on "proximate cause." For general risks, try
http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsb2254.pdf

ownerbuilder2012 09-28-2012 09:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by drewdin (Post 77609)
pay attention to what you are doing, measure twice and cut once, if your not sure about something stop and find out how, dont just guess. People laugh at me but I wear standard PPE depending on what Im doing, steel toe, hard hat, glasses and respirator if its dusty/ insulation work. I plan on enjoying the house when im done

Nothing is wrong about wearing PPE, even if you're dealing with minor house repairs or projects.

Think about it, safety glasses would look better on you than an eye patch.

CallMeVilla 10-01-2012 12:17 AM

Stay focused at all times, particularly around power tools.
Stay alert about the position of your hands in relation to nail guns.
Wear steel tipped boots
Wear gloves whenever possible
Pay attention to slipping and falling hazards
Turn off the power before wiring
Test every circuit for energy before touching them

The list is sooooo long

Wuzzat? 10-03-2012 12:14 PM

On the measure twice/cut once, no measurement is perfect and usually the penalty for being oversize is much worse than being undersize, or vice versa. I usually write down a desired dimension along with a reasonable max and min dims.

And if the workpiece is not in your workshop, take digital photos. There is always some dim that you should have written down that you didn't.

ownerbuilder2012 10-03-2012 08:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 77841)
On the measure twice/cut once, no measurement is perfect and usually the penalty for being oversize is much worse than being undersize, or vice versa. I usually write down a desired dimension along with a reasonable max and min dims.

And if the workpiece is not in your workshop, take digital photos. There is always some dim that you should have written down that you didn't.


I'm also very particular with this. It is very common rule when you're working on a project. A mistake in measure can be costly, undersize or oversize.

nealtw 10-03-2012 09:45 PM

Anyone can be perfect, it takes a pro to hide the mistakes.


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