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-   -   Lifting my house (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f45/lifting-my-house-10842/)

russstevenson1 02-24-2011 12:10 PM

Lifting my house
 
Hello All,

I am new to the forum. Thanks for having me.

I have a small frame house (29' x 29') on a crawl space in Florida. It should probably be torn down, but I am going to try to save it. The house has no footers and I am planning to lift the house a few feet, dig and pour footers, add three courses of block underneath, set it down, tear the roof off, extend the rear of the house about 12' and put on a new hip roof.

I had a local draftsman draw plans. The plans have been blessed by an engineer.

The house is completely gutted, right down to the floor joists. I am going to pour (9) 4' x 4' concrete pads, buy old railroad ties for cribbing, buy nine bottle jacks, make my own wooden beams (3) out of 2 x 8s which I will attach to the undersides of the floor joists, attach steel plates to my beams where the jacks will hit, leave the jacks in the center of the concrete pads and up she goes - I hope.

My question: How far from the corners of the house should I pour my pads?

Sorry for the lengthy post.

Many Thanks,
Russ Stevenson

inspectorD 02-24-2011 12:52 PM

Me
 
I would go talk to the same engineer who helped out with the plans. We do not know your soil type, or even what your point loads are. It's an easy question for someone who is dealing with what you have, just not easy for us armchair QB's.
Good luck on your project, and always send us pictures of what your up to.:D

nealtw 02-24-2011 05:32 PM

Sounds like a plan. Your pads want to be as close to the corner as you can get them and leave room for your footing. keep in mind the weight spreads out in the pad at 45 degrees so 6x6 post can sit on a pad thats 18x 18 and 10" deep. You go bigger for poor soil, if you have to go to 48x48 ,you want to go to 12' deep and 5 rebar each way in a grid. You do need a geotech engineer to check your soil for pads and footings

joecaption 02-24-2011 05:59 PM

Sounds like a plan for desaster. 2 x 8's are not nearly enoght to lift a house that big. A real house lifting company would use steel I beams at least 12" wide.
Most footings are 24" wide and 8" deep with rebar. The piers are 24
X 24" X 6" thick, unless there's some really swampy soil.
It's an art to lift a house, keep it level and not have anything crack, and be able to set it down again without anyone getting killed.
Just because you saw it on TV does not make you an expert on how to do it.
I've seen two houses that DIY's tryed to save a buck and do it there self's, One was a total loss when it came crashing down the other Two years later there still trying fix all the broken sheetrock and broken floor joist.

JoeD 02-25-2011 06:44 AM

House lifter don't pour pads for lifting. They just use a layer of 8x8 and keep pushing them into the ground until the house starts to go up.

nealtw 02-25-2011 06:05 PM

the biggest problem here is the beams only 3" wide will want to roll out if the house gets out of balance or if one timber crushes more than its mate. I think I would use three of what ever size you use. Your engineer will have the numbers for how much the house weighs

JoeD 02-26-2011 06:40 PM

A house that size can be lifted with two beams. That is how many they used to do mine, which is almost identical size, 25 years ago.

joecaption 02-27-2011 06:35 AM

Maximum Span Calculator for Joists & Rafters

inspectorD 02-27-2011 07:14 AM

OK, no offense Joe, just doin my homework.
 
So I just ran some numbers just to check this caculator out with some joists, and I end up with a problem. Don't get me wrong, I love that this is out there. However I have an issue with the way it is displayed concerning the bearing ends.
That 4 letter word "code" only allows a minimun of 1.5 inches of bearing on wood and 3 inches on concrete or block....never 0.53. I understand this is what the wood can acommodate, but why would they even put that information out there if it can NEVER be used. It confuses the person who is researching the information.
ALWAYS contact your local building official does not work either...some areas do not even have one.
Any engineers care to explain?





The Maximum Horizontal Span is:
18 ft. 9 in.
with a minimum bearing length of 0.53 in.
required at each end of the member.

russstevenson1 02-27-2011 08:20 AM

Hello Again,

Thanks for the replies.

JoeD said: A house that size can be lifted with two beams. That is how many they used to do mine, which is almost identical size, 25 years ago.I need to use three beams because my floor joists run from the outside walls to a beam which runs down the center of the house. That center beam will be my third beam.

nealtw said: the biggest problem here is the beams only 3" wide will want to roll out if the house gets out of balance or if one timber crushes more than its mate. I think I would use three of what ever size you use. Your engineer will have the numbers for how much the house weighs.
I agree that the 3" wide beams will be too narrow. I will use three beams totaling 4.5" and I plan to attach the beams to the floor joists with straps or hangers yet to be determined.

JoeD said: House lifter don't pour pads for lifting. They just use a layer of 8x8 and keep pushing them into the ground until the house starts to go up.The soil the house sits on is mostly sand. I thought that the concrete pads would eliminate the 8 x 8s sinking into the ground. And if I keep the pads all on the same level, the lift would go smoother and I wouldn't need as many 8 x 8s.

joe caption said: Sounds like a plan for desaster. 2 x 8's are not nearly enoght to lift a house that big. A real house lifting company would use steel I beams at least 12" wide.
Most footings are 24" wide and 8" deep with rebar. The piers are 24
X 24" X 6" thick, unless there's some really swampy soil.
It's an art to lift a house, keep it level and not have anything crack, and be able to set it down again without anyone getting killed.
Just because you saw it on TV does not make you an expert on how to do it.
I've seen two houses that DIY's tryed to save a buck and do it there self's, One was a total loss when it came crashing down the other Two years later there still trying fix all the broken sheetrock and broken floor joist.
My house has no drywall to crack. No floors, no ceilings. Only walls and a roof and siding. The floor joists and beams are 2 x 8s now. And I might use 2 x 10s instead of 2 x 8s. That is if I can fit them under the house. I do not claim to be an expert. If I was an expert, I wouldn't be seeking advice from this forum. I am a poor man with very limited means and I can't afford to pay a lifter $10k to lift the house. I can't even afford $5k. I have been working on houses most of my life and I am not about to kill myself on this project. I thought it would be fun.

neal tw said: Sounds like a plan. Your pads want to be as close to the corner as you can get them and leave room for your footing. keep in mind the weight spreads out in the pad at 45 degrees so 6x6 post can sit on a pad thats 18x 18 and 10" deep. You go bigger for poor soil, if you have to go to 48x48 ,you want to go to 12' deep and 5 rebar each way in a grid. You do need a geotech engineer to check your soil for pads and footings.I was told by an architect that the best base for concrete is undisturbed sand. If so, then I have a great base for my pads. I will head your advice and use rebar and make the pads thicker than my original 4". I want to use 48" x 48" pads so as to keep my jacks in the center of the pad and between the cribbing - that is, if the jacks will fit. I think they will.

inspectorD said: I would go talk to the same engineer who helped out with the plans. We do not know your soil type, or even what your point loads are. It's an easy question for someone who is dealing with what you have, just not easy for us armchair QB's.
Good luck on your project, and always send us pictures of what your up to.
I might talk to the engineer, but I might not. They are very expensive and tend to over engineer things - liability issues, I think.

I will post photos as soon as I can. It will take me a long time to do this lift, as I work mostly alone and I have to do it in my spare time, which is hard to come by.

Thanks Again,
Russell


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