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-   -   Share a Tip (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f45/share-tip-3311/)

ToolGuy 01-03-2008 05:50 PM

Share a Tip
 
Okay, I'll start. :D

Applying joint compound? Wanna get it smoooooooth? Ad about 1 teaspoon of dish soap per gallon of compound and it will glide on like butter - a little secret the pro's use. Smells nice too! ;)

Also, premixed joint compound is too thick for most applications, and is meant to be watered down. For finish coats, the thinner you're able to manage it the nicer a finish you'll be able to achieve.

Don't forget to prime!

wightie13 01-03-2008 09:33 PM

More on joint compound
 
I worked with a guy who showed me a cool trick to save a step. Just like ToolGuy says premixed compound needs watered down and to not forget to prime, my old boss would mix primer in with the premixed compound and would roll it on the wall to texture the wall and prime it at the same time.

glennjanie 01-03-2008 10:19 PM

Do away with the sandpaper! DIY'ers usually have to sand the compound so much they and the whole house is covered with sheetrock dust. For those little rudges that pop up at the side of the knife can be lightly sprayed with a water and scraped off with the same knife.
Then there are the little tiny bubbles; use a wet sponge to smooth that down, removing the high spots and filling the low spots. Trust me, it is a lot easier on your lungs and it really works.
Glenn

wightie13 01-04-2008 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glennjanie (Post 13831)
Do away with the sandpaper! DIY'ers usually have to sand the compound so much they and the whole house is covered with sheetrock dust. For those little rudges that pop up at the side of the knife can be lightly sprayed with a water and scraped off with the same knife.
Then there are the little tiny bubbles; use a wet sponge to smooth that down, removing the high spots and filling the low spots. Trust me, it is a lot easier on your lungs and it really works.
Glenn

Yeah, I have realized as I get get more experience taping the less you have to sand but just a little scrapping and a wet sponge do the trick.

ToolGuy 01-04-2008 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glennjanie (Post 13831)
Do away with the sandpaper! DIY'ers usually have to sand the compound so much they and the whole house is covered with sheetrock dust. For those little rudges that pop up at the side of the knife can be lightly sprayed with a water and scraped off with the same knife.
Then there are the little tiny bubbles; use a wet sponge to smooth that down, removing the high spots and filling the low spots. Trust me, it is a lot easier on your lungs and it really works.
Glenn

Only thing is though, I don't wet the surface to scrape away the ridges. I guess wetting it makes for a little less dust, but that's not really an issue in most of my working environments. But sponging over sanding... Heck Yeah! :D

Phatboy 01-06-2008 08:07 PM

These are great guys...and im not a pro but these couple tips helped me.

For hanging drywall on a ceiling, cut a 2x4 6 inches longer than your ceiling height, and cut another 24inches. nail the 24in peice perpendicular to the long peice for a DIYer drywall lift. Make two, You and a friend can easily handle some 4x8 sheets, and you wont wear yourself out holding the sheets up.

For a ceiling that has a joist width of more than 16inches on center, use 5/8 drywall. Its thick enough that you wont have to add bracing to hold it up, and its more resistant to sagging over time.

Lay your drywall sheets horizontal. Your tape line will be at a convinient height to work, and you will have the beveled factory edges touching for easy taping.


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