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Old 04-13-2008, 07:55 AM  
inspectorD
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Default Well it's spring

So what are your plans this year to save some energy.
Prices and materials are only going to keep rising!!!

My Out-laws are installing a solar electric system on their home this month. My brother in law already has one he put in 2 years ago. His return on investment is going to be 4 more years because of the rising utility rates. Not bad for a 30 year system.
I want to install one ...but my goal is a total efficiency home. The old albatross we own now is not worth the system, I have done all that is required for this place. So I will be working on building a new home in 5 years, that is the plan anyway.

Spring is here and winter is only 8 months away...what will you do?



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Old 09-09-2008, 07:57 PM  
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Default Now

Now it's fall, hope you all are not playing catchup.,

Insulation and air leaks are where to start. Try www.nuwool.com for a good insulation material. I am starting to think it is better than the foams out there due to some testing I have seen.

Do something...energy will be high.



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Old 09-10-2008, 06:13 AM  
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Default Nice job

Thanks Educator for putting all that time into your projects and sharing.
At least you are not selling anything to us folks here.

I love this subject , and wish more folks where on board.
Folks would rather spend $100 a month on cable TV than spend the $1200 it takes to put some better insulation in the attic.
Someday we will all be there, but unfortunately it will take a while.

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Old 12-01-2008, 03:01 PM  
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We find that we don't have to crank on the AC if we just run a fan in the room where we're sitting. It seems to help- the thermostat is usually at 80 degrees or higher in the summer and we're still comfortable. Of course, there's only 2 of us, so we don't have to worry about keeping multiple rooms in the house cool.

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Old 12-02-2008, 06:50 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glennjanie View Post
Hello Educator:
Copper comes several different ways: soft (in a coil), hard copper which comes in straight lengths, classified as K, L, M and DWV. The Drain Waste and Vent copper is the thinnest grade, obviously it doesn't carry pressure. The other 3 types all have the same outside dimensions but the grades are thicker or thinner. L is the most used grade of copper for water lines and comes in both coil and straight lengths. L is also the type used for HVAC-R, the only difference is the tube has been evacuated and capped to prevent oxidation inside.
Kentucky's Plumbing Department is deadly serious about cross-connections, back flow and back pressure. It is so important to us that I used to give my students the day off if they could quote (word for word) the definition of cross-connection. One of them really worked at it; he even quoted it backward without missing a word.
In the case of the DWHR one of the lines is already violated (the drain) and the supply line may not always have pressure on it; thus the possibility of backflow.
Glenn
Probably the best way to do this is with two separate coils, one for wastewater and one for potable, both of which are installed in a small tank filled with a transfer medium, such as RV antifreeze. In order for wastewater to contaminate the potable water, both coils would have to leak. Either one leaking would cause a level change in the transfer medium. As to cost effective??? Perhaps, perhaps not.
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Old 02-16-2009, 04:16 PM  
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Use a thermal carafe! When your coffee maker is done brewing your morning pot of java, instead of leaving it on the heated plate or in the heated percolator, simply pour the hot coffee into a thermal, insulated carafe. Then turn off the coffee maker. A good thermal carafe will keep your coffee piping hot for a couple of hours – much longer than is usually necessary.



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