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-   -   Advice on circular saw please (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f6/advice-circular-saw-please-12026/)

zani 08-28-2011 01:46 PM

Advice on circular saw please
 
Hello! I'm a bit of a tool novice, bought a 'skil' circular saw a couple months ago to cut fence panels etc. It worked great at first but now it is cutting very slowly and I find I have to push it to get through (which I understand you are not supposed to do generally). Could the blade be dull already? It is a corded model so it's not a battery problem. I accidentally cut into some rubbery material with it once (long story) could this have damaged or gummed-up the blade somehow? I think I have the blade tightened correctly because I don't get any problems with slipping, etc but maybe I'm wrong about this. One more thing, I bought a very small tooth blade for it because I hear they make 'neater' cuts (less splintering), do these wear out easier? I know the smaller teeth will cut slower in general but it was much faster when I first used the blade than it is now. Advice greatly appreciated!

oldognewtrick 08-28-2011 04:43 PM

Try putting a new balde on, they are not that expensive. You shouldn't have to force the cut, the saw should be able to cut without to much pressure.

Johnboy555 09-09-2011 02:11 AM

I don't use my circular saw every day but this is the blade that I have been the most happy with. 7-1/4 in. x 24 Tooth Carbide Circular Saw Blade-D0724R at The Home Depot
It has a very thin kerf and just flys through the lumber. Pine or MDF... makes no difference.

kok328 09-09-2011 07:48 AM

Did you happen to put the blade on backwards?

circleR 09-19-2011 08:49 PM

The small teeth will wear out more quickly, especially if they are not carbide. Get the blade appropriate for the job... A neater cut doesn't make framing any better, or mdf requires finer teeth than cdx plywood, for example. Also, be aware that saw blades have a "break in" period. Use 1/3 to 1/2 of normal force for the first handful of cuts, then cut as usual.

EZHangDoor 10-09-2011 07:32 PM

Most blades that come with a new saw aren't the best quality. Change the blade with a new carbide tip teeth. You'll be surprised.

BridgeMan 10-09-2011 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zani (Post 60450)
Hello! I'm a bit of a tool novice, . . . . I accidentally cut into some rubbery material with it once (long story) could this have damaged or gummed-up the blade somehow? . . . .

Rubber-coated teeth can be problematic. Try giving them a vigorous scrub using an old toothbrush and lacquer thinner. And once clean, look them over carefully under a bright light. If the point and edges of each tooth are not "crisp," consider having it professionally sharpened. Around here the going rate is $0.25 per tooth, so a 40-tooth blade will cost $10. If it's a cheapo blade, don't waste your $$$ on sharpening, just invest in a higher-quality blade (and stay away from old tires with it!).

tinalin 10-18-2011 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldog/newtrick (Post 60454)
Try putting a new balde on, they are not that expensive. You shouldn't have to force the cut, the saw should be able to cut without to much pressure.

I agree with you. Just try a new blade.

KerryAll 10-23-2011 08:11 AM

...and make sure, like earlier mentioned, make sure the blade rotation is correct. The blade should have an arrow on it. Oh, and read the manual! You'd be surprsied what a little knowledge can do... ;)

thegogetter222 10-24-2011 11:32 AM

new blade.

try Harbor Freight if you don't want to spend a ton of money on guessing... JMO


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