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-   -   using a router (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f6/using-router-13706/)

sisyphus 04-01-2012 07:16 PM

using a router
 
hello all, I purchased a router a few years ago, but other than familiarizing myself with how it works, it's been in the garage all this time. now that I have a little extra time I have some home projects that I believe the router will be very applicable for. it's a basic ryobi router, nothing fancy. while I was turning the depth ring, I found that there was some resistance to it. I'm thinking of spraying some silicone on the threads so that it turns easier. the locking mechanism for the ring is also hard to turn to lock. should I do this? or is there any safety issues? thanks

mabloodhound 04-10-2012 01:46 PM

You should be fine with a little lubricant on the adjustment/lock threads. Just NEVER add any lubrication to the threads that hold the cutter in the chuck!

Duffy 05-18-2012 07:12 AM

I had some difficulties with router too, at first. But I want to say that with practice you will understand the most effective ways of using it.

nealtw 05-18-2012 07:51 AM

The big thing you want to learn about the router is direction of travel. The cuting edge wants to turn in the same direction as the push. Pushing it backward, the cuting edge can chatter on the wood and the router will take you for a ride.

mabloodhound 05-18-2012 04:07 PM

Actually, Neal's description is not correct. You want to normally push your work INTO the cutter edge if using a router table, AGAINST the rotation of the cutter.
If using the router freehand, you want the cutter to be turning INTO the work, NOT with the direction of travel.

The opposite of this is called climb routing and can have a use in certain applications with tough grain. But that is only for experienced users.

nealtw 05-18-2012 05:15 PM

Hound : thanx, that is what I meant to say.

kok328 05-18-2012 05:41 PM

Best advice is to practice on a piece of scrap wood to get the feel of how it handles.

mabloodhound 05-19-2012 08:13 AM

I knew that's what you meant, Neal. Bit rotation is probably the most important aspect to pay attention to ( for a newbie) when using a router.


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