DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Carpentry and Woodworking (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f6/)
-   -   wood cutting (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f6/wood-cutting-11334/)

sisyphus 05-13-2011 07:03 AM

wood cutting
 
is there a secret to cutting wood more precise? whenever I'm cutting, there always seems to be inconsistencies in my cutting. I use a quick framing square when cutting, but sometimes I have to recut or use shims. also I found out recently that not everything is what is marked on home depot 2x4studs. some where a little longer than 8' and a couple were actually cut a couple of inches shorter. when I checked the ends they showed that someone had cut them. I assumed that these were returned items.

nealtw 05-13-2011 08:05 AM

studs should be 92 1/4 Canada. or 92 5/8 US. 8 foot length of lumber are about 96 1/4

nealtw 05-13-2011 08:08 AM

If the saw has been dropped a few time the table may not be square to the blade, the the quick sq. will not help in this case.

DrHicks 05-15-2011 06:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sisyphus (Post 56904)
is there a secret to cutting wood more precise? whenever I'm cutting, there always seems to be inconsistencies in my cutting. I use a quick framing square when cutting, but sometimes I have to recut or use shims. also I found out recently that not everything is what is marked on home depot 2x4studs. some where a little longer than 8' and a couple were actually cut a couple of inches shorter. when I checked the ends they showed that someone had cut them. I assumed that these were returned items.

You were the unfortunate recipient of a dishonest man's screw job. 2x4 studs cost less than $2 each. Why anybody would jack with them, and cut them, then return them as if they were simply excess, is beyond me. What is wrong with people?!?!?!

Beyond that, accurate cutting requires decent tools and a careful hand & eye.

sailingaway 05-25-2011 07:37 AM

Might sound elementary and if it does, I apologize. But remember to take the thickness of the blade into account. If you measure and draw a line be sure to measure again to determine where on the line you should cut. If you cut on the wrong side, you will be probably at least an 1/8" off. This can lead to a lot of inconsistency.

losttool 07-01-2011 09:39 PM

measuring tape
 
I take my measuring tape everytime I go to buy wood. Sometimes the wood is in the wrong stack and after I find a straight piece it is the wrong length.

BrianKiernan 07-30-2011 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingaway (Post 57281)
Might sound elementary and if it does, I apologize. But remember to take the thickness of the blade into account. If you measure and draw a line be sure to measure again to determine where on the line you should cut. If you cut on the wrong side, you will be probably at least an 1/8" off. This can lead to a lot of inconsistency.

This is a good point

BridgeMan 08-14-2011 11:19 AM

Measure twice, cut once.

Snav 08-18-2011 08:40 PM

I found that after dropping my saw several times the blade spindle was knocked crooked. I had to then adjust the angle of the blade to be just beyond "0" - a slight degree - to cut square to the surface.

For lengths being off-square per the run of your saw - get a better, longer T-square and use it in the same direction every time and see if it works better for you.

Use a pen - not a marker. The fatness of a marker tip can cause problems and weep.

And just don't trust that anything in a box store which is pre-cut just because it says it is cut precisely. Precision takes more care than what a crude factor saw mill ususally dedicates it's time to for box stores - their bigger concern is getting the wood sliced, not measured accurately every single time - their blades get out of whack and they change them or adjust them only when it's necessary.

nealtw 08-24-2011 02:46 PM

Saw mills always cut lumber a little longer 1/4 to 3/4 depending on the mill. Precut studs are usually very good but the finger jointed precut studs are often done in a re-man mill and the quality can drop right off. Then you have to watch for studs shipped to the wrong market, Canada and the US have a different standard. 92 1/4 in Canada or 92 5/8 in the US.
As hard as you try you will always end up with rough framing. Top and bottom plates will shrink as they dry out and depending on how wet they were at the mill will end up drying to different thickness. This can easily shrink some walls by 1/4" and other walls not so much. Dimentional lumber like 2x10 used for a header can sometime shrink in height up to 1/4 inch.
This is why everyone hates framers.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:41 PM.