DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   HVAC (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f8/)
-   -   NO HEATER at all yet; Tiny Log Cabin.. the options are? (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f8/no-heater-all-yet-tiny-log-cabin-options-16611/)

coachgeo 10-05-2013 09:40 PM

NO HEATER at all yet; Tiny Log Cabin.. the options are?
 
This is a tiny log cabin with 12x16 foot of total space. 4" thick logs so it should have a nice R value total. It was built to be moved by truck so it is on 1/2 a mobile home chassis. The plastic lining and insulation below the floor needs redoing so that opens the option of Radiant floor heat while under there anyway.

For a long time it will be a micro home rental for college student? orr?

sooooooo....... what is best bang for the buck in that case?

Small LP wall unit?

Faux LP fire place?

Radiant Floor? (CNC or LP)

Baseboard electric

Electric Radiant heater?

orrrr?

Blue Jay 10-06-2013 07:39 PM

First off logs do NOT have an R value but are classed as thermal mass, with only a 4" log it won't be much. In floor radiant would heat thru out but recovery time would be a lot longer than a flame of some kind.

I live in a log home 1500 sq ft. and use a heat pump with propane backup.

coachgeo 10-06-2013 08:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blue Jay (Post 92252)
First off logs do NOT have an R value but are classed as thermal mass, with only a 4" log it won't be much. In floor radiant would heat thru out but recovery time would be a lot longer than a flame of some kind.

I live in a log home 1500 sq ft. and use a heat pump with propane backup.

Thanks for the info. Good point on the thermal mass. A radiant heater of some type might be good on top of an LP type as a fill in to get that mass warmed to help maintain the heat more efficiently.

iloveremodeling 11-22-2013 01:06 PM

It might be worth asking an HVAC professional to see if they have any helpful suggestions. Good luck!

Wuzzat? 12-13-2013 06:55 PM

Not a pro, but. . .

"Canadian Wood Council has a Technical Bulletin on Thermal performance of light-frame wood assemblies. It discusses an R value of 1.5/inch of thickness for wood products:
http://www.cwc.ca



Also, from 1993 ASHRAE standard, the R value per inch of thickness is about 1.1 F*ft^2*h/BTU per inch of thickness."

coachgeo 12-13-2013 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 97166)
Not a pro, but. . .

"Canadian Wood Council has a Technical Bulletin on Thermal performance of light-frame wood assemblies. It discusses an R value of 1.5/inch of thickness for wood products:
http://www.cwc.ca



Also, from 1993 ASHRAE standard, the R value per inch of thickness is about 1.1 F*ft^2*h/BTU per inch of thickness."

hmmm...... now wuzaat the "F" and "h" in the last formula:p

Wuzzat? 12-13-2013 07:28 PM

"R-values are given in units of (ft^2)Fhr/Btu."

12x16 is 192 Ft^2
The Grainger catalog gives rules of thumb for sizing heaters.
Figure that 10w/(ft^2) gives you a ~100% efficient 2 kw elec. heater that you should rent.
On a cold night run the heater until the inside temp stabilizes at a comfortable level.
Then run the heater for two hours or so while the outside temp stays constant and record the kwh used on your elec. meter.
A BTU/hr is 0.293 watt.

If the outside temp is your average winter temp then this is how many BTU/hr or kw you need to heat your place and it will do the job half the time.
If you can find the outside design temperature for your location a larger heater size can be figured so it does the job 95% or 99% of the time.

Then whatever fuel or electricity gives you the least $/BTU is a good choice but you have to figure in the reduced efficiency of these other heat sources to size the heater needed.

coachgeo 12-13-2013 07:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 97168)
"R-values are given in units of (ft^2)Fhr/Btu."

:o Learn something new everyday

Thanks

Wuzzat? 12-14-2013 09:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coachgeo (Post 97169)
:o Learn something new everyday

Thanks

[stuff learned each day] - [stuff you've forgotten] > 0?
:beer:

Countryboy26047 12-14-2013 10:17 AM

Just an idea here.. my initial thoughts when reading this, were the idea of installing an LP furnace that are built for pop-up campers.. They operate off of a 20lb or bigger lp cylinder which makes transporting the building with heater about as simple as could be, are thermostatically controlled, and IMO a very safe option for open-flame type heating as they are built to be used in what is basically an aluminum shell with many yds. of canvas on them..


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:49 PM.