DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Electrical and Wiring > 15 or 20 amp GFCI receptacle?





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Old 06-10-2013, 06:28 PM  
Ocean_Man
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If the plug is rated for 15 amps and you plug in two items that add up to more than 15 amps but less than 20, you have a problem. Far safer to use the 20 amp plug and there might be rules on this .
There are rules on it. The rule says that on a 20 amp branch circuit your receptacles can be rated at 15 or 20 amps.

So if you are really drawing high amperage go for the 20.


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Old 06-10-2013, 06:30 PM  
Ocean_Man
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Woops, didn't realize you are in Canada. I don't know what the rules are in Canada. Probably slightly different, though.



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Old 06-10-2013, 06:53 PM  
nealtw
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Don't care what the rules are it still has to make sence, I can plug in two items at 9 amps each, I have overloaded the plug and I have no protection from the breaker. Take the rules as a guide, just because they missed it , dosn't mean you should.
BTW Welcome to the site.

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Old 06-10-2013, 08:56 PM  
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What 2 items do you plug in that are 9 amps each?

But you're right if you use 18 amps on one receptacle it had better be a 20 amp receptacle. However, the vast majority of receptacles do not use 18 amps and are only rated for 15 amps.

Also, if you really are using 18 amps on one receptacle it's time to consider installing another circuit...unless its the only thing on that circuit.

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Old 06-10-2013, 09:44 PM  
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You do have to remember you dealing with people and people do all kind s of things, it just wouldn't be that hard to get to 18 amps



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Old 06-11-2013, 05:20 AM  
speedy petey
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Originally Posted by Ocean_Man View Post
Use a 15 amp GFCI unless you use a lot of power out of this outlet. If you figure you use more than 12 amps then consider a 20 amp GFCI. But, you will need to verify #12 or larger wire before you do. Most GFCI receptacles are fine to be 15 amp rated and there is nothing wrong with using them on 15 or 20 amp circuits unless they are going to be submitted to very high load.
WHAT are you talking about???
You are implying that a GFI has any kind of overcurrent function. They do NOT.
GFI's have NOTHING to do with the load on the circuit or the device itself other than to monitor for imbalance.

A 15A GFI is TWO 15A receptacles. A 20A GFI is two 20A receptacles.
The ONLY reason to use a 20A GFI is if you need the 20A plug configuration. BOTH have a 20A feed-thru rating. They are basically the same internally.
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Old 06-11-2013, 05:28 AM  
speedy petey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
If the plug is rated for 15 amps and you plug in two items that add up to more than 15 amps but less than 20, you have a problem. Far safer to use the 20 amp plug and there might be rules on this .
Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
Don't care what the rules are it still has to make sence, I can plug in two items at 9 amps each, I have overloaded the plug and I have no protection from the breaker. Take the rules as a guide, just because they missed it , dosn't mean you should.
BTW Welcome to the site.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocean_Man View Post
What 2 items do you plug in that are 9 amps each?

But you're right if you use 18 amps on one receptacle it had better be a 20 amp receptacle. However, the vast majority of receptacles do not use 18 amps and are only rated for 15 amps.

Also, if you really are using 18 amps on one receptacle it's time to consider installing another circuit...unless its the only thing on that circuit.
Wow! So much misinformation.

See my previous reply. A 15A DUPLEX receptacle is TWO 15A receptacles with a feed-thru of 20A. YES, you CAN plug in two 9A loads into a 15A duplex and it will be FINE.

Neal, I know you are a long time member here, but this statement: "I can plug in two items at 9 amps each, I have overloaded the plug and I have no protection from the breaker.", is just painfully wrong. HOW can you possibly say there would be no protection from the breaker? On top of this, the breaker protects the wire, NOT the load.

Sorry guys, but replies like this bother me quite a bit. It shows that anyone, even folks who really don't know all they should, can give electrical advice, and any unsuspecting DIYer will just read it and take it for fact.
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Old 06-11-2013, 09:53 AM  
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Wow! So much misinformation.

See my previous reply. A 15A DUPLEX receptacle is TWO 15A receptacles with a feed-thru of 20A. YES, you CAN plug in two 9A loads into a 15A duplex and it will be FINE.

Neal, I know you are a long time member here, but this statement: "I can plug in two items at 9 amps each, I have overloaded the plug and I have no protection from the breaker.", is just painfully wrong. HOW can you possibly say there would be no protection from the breaker? On top of this, the breaker protects the wire, NOT the load.

Sorry guys, but replies like this bother me quite a bit. It shows that anyone, even folks who really don't know all they should, can give electrical advice, and any unsuspecting DIYer will just read it and take it for fact.
I don't mind being told I am wrong but I came by this on honestly. Home owner, removed stove, split the feed and install 120 volt plugs and over loaded the plug and gutted the kitchen.
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Old 06-11-2013, 12:32 PM  
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A stove circuit is 40 or 50 amps not 20amps. There is a big difference there.
I would be curious to know if the plug overheated or the cable overheated and caused the fire. More likely the cable overheated.

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Old 06-11-2013, 02:44 PM  
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The breaker was never changed , the fire started at the box, the wire was still protected by the breaker, so the thought by others involved was the outlet.

I have no doubt that Speedy is right when he say the 15 amp plug will carry 20 amps. But that being said I doubt if it says that on the plug, I don't have one to look at.
The breaker is there to protect the wire and I will argue the the plug is part of the wire system and if the breaker isn't there to potect that what is?
We have to remember who is reading this thread and how many people reading it never drop by to clarify the answer. Do we really want to put info out there where people should disregard the amp rating on anything, code or not?



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