DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum

DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Electrical and Wiring (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/)
-   -   advice about new wiring for heaters (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/advice-about-new-wiring-heaters-1735/)

jetjaguar 01-08-2007 03:47 PM

advice about new wiring for heaters
 
I have a small home in So. Cal. Built 1947, concrete slab. We want to install baseboard heaters. A single portable heater is already tripping the breaker.

An Electrician we had called recommended we run new wiring just for the baseboards, so they won't trip other breakers. Maybe even one breaker per heater (6).

My question is, roughly what can I expect in terms of hours to run this cabling with the work that needs to be done on the panel as well? Each heater is 1500 Watts, 240 volts, 5118 BTU. I realize each room is a different distance from the panel, but if someone can give a ballpark estimate, maybe as a function of feet from the panel, that will be very helpful.


thanks in advance,

Peter

Parrothead 01-10-2007 04:25 PM

It is difficult to estimate the time involved without actually seeing the property and what unique little challenges present themselves. I'm used to homes with basements or at least crawl spaces, which tends to make things easier.

I agree that you should put these heaters on dedicated circuits, but I don't think it's necessary to have each one on its own. That would require 12 spaces in your breaker panel. You could easily put two heaters on a 20 amp circuit, thus reducing your needed space to six, not to mention cutting your conductor length in half.

Snoonyb 01-10-2007 07:08 PM

Just out of curiosity, why would you entertain that heating appliance for this region?

glennjanie 01-11-2007 11:46 AM

JetJaguar; I can see that the electric baseboard heaters would be the most economical system to install; and the utilities claim they are very efficient to operate as long as each room has a seperate thermostat and un-used rooms are turned off. Also, do you live in a rural area where other fuels would not be dependable or even available?
If you do use the system of turning off un-used rooms, make sure you are careful about freezing water in those rooms. Some heat tape might come in very handy here.
Glenn

renoguy 01-11-2007 12:31 PM

baseboard heat
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by jetjaguar (Post 7260)
I have a small home in So. Cal. Built 1947, concrete slab. We want to install baseboard heaters. A single portable heater is already tripping the breaker.

An Electrician we had called recommended we run new wiring just for the baseboards, so they won't trip other breakers. Maybe even one breaker per heater (6).

My question is, roughly what can I expect in terms of hours to run this cabling with the work that needs to be done on the panel as well? Each heater is 1500 Watts, 240 volts, 5118 BTU. I realize each room is a different distance from the panel, but if someone can give a ballpark estimate, maybe as a function of feet from the panel, that will be very helpful.


thanks in advance,

Peter

Questions to ask yourself about the baseboard installation:
How big is the AMPERAGE of the electrical service in the house?
(usually 60, or 100 in an older house like that) If the service is under 100 amps I would not recommend any baseboard heat at all.
so, then if your service is 100 amps or over, the second question is:
How many empty panel spaces are there?(spaces for more breakers in your panel)
You will need at least 4 empty spaces (for two 240volt circuts)

SO, if you have enough amperage and enough empty spaces, then the installation should be fairly reasonably priced. The only other thing that would affect price would be if there is an easy route for the wires to be run, if the walls are opened up already it's a lot easier for the electrician to do the work, if he has to "fish" wires behind finished walls, it'll be more expensive.
hope this helps you. good luck!

renoguy 01-11-2007 12:37 PM

PS.....If you live where it doesn't freeze outside in the winter, don't bother with 1500 watt heaters for a 10 x 10 room, it's way overkill! half that size would be okay. I live in a place where the winters can get real cold (Canada) and a 1000 watt baseboard heater in the bedroom is fine.

jetjaguar 01-14-2007 11:36 AM

thanks everyone for your responses
 
It's a rental house and and the tenants want to be warm. There is no other heating available. There is a broken down hvac on the roof (no crawlspace) but it is beyond repair, had it checked by two different techs.

I realize now that we just need to get an electrician out there to look at the job and quote. That has been scheduled now.

The only thing I'm wondering about is the amperage to the whole house...based on one of the responses. I guess we'll know soon enough.

Thanks again everyone,

Peter


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:21 PM.