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-   -   attaching cat6 ethernet cable to joists (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/attaching-cat6-ethernet-cable-joists-17825/)

LeakingFaucet 06-30-2014 12:05 PM

attaching cat6 ethernet cable to joists
 
I'm running new cat6 cable under my house / in a crawlspace. I don't want the cables dangling like a massive jumprope.

I see that the power / rg6 lines are stapled to the joists.

What should I use to attach the cat6 cable to the joists? I was thinking a staple gun would apply too much force and would crush the cable and ruin the runs. I was also thinking about coax staples.

Something like this => http://www.homedepot.com/p/Gardner-B...G-50/202906374

Can anyone chime in with what's common practice? Code for low voltage runs?

inspectorD 06-30-2014 06:58 PM

yup
 
Looks like you got it...:trophy:
Those will work just fine. Have fun under the house.... wear a respirator.. please..:)

kok328 06-30-2014 08:43 PM

Ordered new cable & internet and watched/helped the installer.
He had a staple gun and staples and just stapled the cable to everything. When I asked if he wasn't crushing the cable, he showed me his gun and staples up close. The staples were U shaped on the end so the staple actually surrounds the cable and maintains it's form.
In this case, you have already nailed it! Get it? Nailed it? :rofl:

kok328 06-30-2014 08:47 PM

P.S. - CAT6A versus CAT6 is a full gigabyte cable & I just saw CAT7 somewhere but, haven't had time to look any further.
Possibly may not be worth the time, most equipment doesn't come close the cable capability.

LeakingFaucet 07-01-2014 10:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kok328 (Post 107319)
Ordered new cable & internet and watched/helped the installer.
He had a staple gun and staples and just stapled the cable to everything. When I asked if he wasn't crushing the cable, he showed me his gun and staples up close. The staples were U shaped on the end so the staple actually surrounds the cable and maintains it's form.
In this case, you have already nailed it! Get it? Nailed it? :rofl:

Well played. slow clap

LeakingFaucet 07-01-2014 10:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kok328 (Post 107320)
P.S. - CAT6A versus CAT6 is a full gigabyte cable & I just saw CAT7 somewhere but, haven't had time to look any further.
Possibly may not be worth the time, most equipment doesn't come close the cable capability.

I'm confused by your post. Cat6a has higher specs so you can run 10GE at the same lengths as Cat5/5e.

Was there something else I missed?

kok328 07-01-2014 05:10 PM

your correct, the way the industry is playing the cable id, the higher the number (5,6,7) the higher the capability specs. Thus, CAT7 should logically be a better cable than CAT6A (the latest til cat7 showed up).
However, unless your running high speed servers your typical/affordable computer (desk or lap top) or I-phones can't push a full Giga-byte of data or otherwise, come close to needing to exceed the specs of the cable. Therefore, for the average joe, there will be little to no difference between using cat5 and cat7.
Your good to go.

bud16415 07-01-2014 06:02 PM

The only reason I can see for running the best is in future proffing your house. I have run a lot of cables in my life saying this will still be good when I'm dead and gone only to find out in ten years it's been obsolete for the last five.


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