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-   -   Microwave use and outlets in an old house (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/microwave-use-outlets-old-house-8709/)

kmn 02-23-2010 11:27 AM

Microwave use and outlets in an old house
 
I live in a home built ~1900. The wiring in general seems to be just fine - I have a few other outlets with power strips and multiple electronic devices and no problems so far. I'm trying to decide into which kitchen outlet I should plug a microwave, but each involves a little adjustment. My choices are:

1) Use a three-to-two prong adapter (three prong microwave cord into an old two prong outlet) to plug into an outlet already in use by a fridge (with the same kind of adapter), or

2) Use a very short heavy duty extension cord (microwave or air conditioner rated) to plug into a three prong outlet. Would I be able to use a power strip for this setup (with only the microwave on the strip)?

I know each might be a little risky. The extension cord is my preference for ease of use, but I'd like some advice/opinion as to whether one is safer than the other, particularly in an old home. I've seen plenty of warnings about extensions cords/power strips, but know I need to use a heavy duty one. Would a microwave AND fridge be too much for one outlet? I do plan on having the microwave plugged in only when I'm using it. Thanks for your advice!

Wuzzat? 02-23-2010 04:16 PM

If the cord's plugs and sockets don't get warm during use you're OK for safety.

Popping circuit breakers are another issue.
If the microwave is running when the fridge starts up the breaker might trip, depending on the breaker's trip "trip curve" or the fuse's "clearing time".
Look at the nameplate current draw on each appliance.

breid1903 02-26-2010 05:33 AM

kmn
 
do you or anyone you care about sleep in this home? if so do not use the hot cord method of circuit testing. either hire a license or buy yourself an amprobe to test the circuits to see if they will handle the amperage. breid.............:banana::banana::banana:

Wuzzat? 02-26-2010 08:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by breid1903 (Post 41466)
the hot cord method

Now it has a name: HCM! :D
Actually, it only checks plug/socket contact resistance. :cool:

For a whole house elec. check all the way back to the pole t'former you need a DVM and a 10A load [like a hair dryer] and about 5 min per outlet.
Or get Ideal's 65-165 tester; that thing will answer your questions before you even ask them.

breid1903 02-26-2010 01:03 PM

ideal 65-165
 
went to the ideal web site. searched for 65-165. there is nothing listed with those numbers. breid..............:banana::banana::banana:

Wuzzat? 02-26-2010 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by breid1903 (Post 41494)
went to the ideal web site. searched for 65-165. there is nothing listed with those numbers. breid..............:banana::banana::banana:

Yes, it's weird
http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=%22we+use+the+Ideal+Model+65-165+circuit+analyzer%22&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8
Maybe it's this
Problems with Ideal SureTest Circuit Analyzer #61-165 - InterNACHI Message Board
I know one of these gadgets was supposed to be able to test AFCIs by simulating an arc.

This type of memory
Semantic memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
is supposed to be more reliable than
Episodic memory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maybe if I owned one I'd remember it better. :(

triple D 02-27-2010 10:06 AM

yes cord!!
 
It is most likely the three prong is a newer romex style wire. Plug in here with a 3-5' air conditioner rated cord.


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