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Old 12-30-2013, 05:11 PM  
savatreatabvr
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Yes I know all about Google Search and I use it frequently but the reason I post questions on this forum is to socialize with other members and hear there input and experiences with my subject!


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Old 12-31-2013, 07:56 AM  
Wuzzat?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by savatreatabvr View Post
Yes I know all about Google Search and I use it frequently but the reason I post questions on this forum is to socialize with other members and hear there input and experiences with my subject!
"Thank you for the links although I don't trust "wikipedia.org" much do to the fact that anyone can edit the contents."

There seems to be a logical flaw in here somewhere with distrusting Wiki but using Google so the new problem for me is not Wirenut colors but finding and "articulating" the flaw (out of maybe 80 listed on Wikipedia).
My end-of-the-year plate is kinda' full but I'll be in touch (which is sort of socializing, or at least a promise of future socializing).


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Old 01-02-2014, 07:30 PM  
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Excerpts from IDEAL's answer:
Wire-Nuts meet the requirements for IEC standard 998-1. [for contact resistance]
The product is typically intended [to last] for 30 years.

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Old 01-06-2014, 08:52 AM  
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Originally Posted by Wuzzat? View Post
Excerpts from IDEAL's answer:
Wire-Nuts meet the requirements for IEC standard 998-1. [for contact resistance]
The product is typically intended [to last] for 30 years.
Yes but I believe on the IDEAL'S packaging, (I don't have it in front of me) but it says, (correct me if i'm wrong) to only use one 6 gauge wire under one large blue wire nut. The reason I started this tread was to find out what wire nuts were used for two 6 gauge wires, if only one 6 gauge wire is rated for one large blue wire nut then the next step up would be an enormous wire nut, lol! I think I'm simply not understanding which wire nuts are meant for what gauges of wire.
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Old 01-06-2014, 01:35 PM  
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Well it depends on which version of the Ideal nut you use. Only the Wing Nut version can accept #6 cable. Here is the specs from the web site.

454®
Blue
600V*
#14 thru #6 AWG
Min. 3 #12
Max. 2 #6 w/ 1 #12

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Old 01-06-2014, 04:04 PM  
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Behind these specs must be a max & min number of circular mils that these devices can handle, among other constraints.

I can't imagine anybody makes a Wirenut for #30 AWG.

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Old 01-14-2014, 12:28 PM  
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Behind these specs must be a max & min number of circular mils that these devices can handle, among other constraints.

I can't imagine anybody makes a Wirenut for #30 AWG.
Well if it's against code to splice a 6/3 cable then what's used to splice a 6/4 cable which is code compliant?
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Old 01-14-2014, 12:41 PM  
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Well if it's against code to splice a 6/3 cable then what's used to splice a 6/4 cable which is code compliant?
You'll need a Sparky to answer this.

BTW, I found at least one logical inconsistency in the NEC. If you believe that statements like
"If the shoe fits, wear it"
says anything about the other three cases then you also may be mislead by the NEC.

To me, the NEC is slightly less arbitrary than the 6000 page Tax Code of the U.S.. But I think there is a bias in both. . .which is that the U.S. Treasury and the NEMA will never come out on the short ends of these sticks when dealing with the average homeowner or taxpayer.

From a physics point of view, high and sustained contact force over the life of the device in a splicing method is virtually as safe as a non-spliced cable because it reduces the contact resistance to near zero. For the real world, splices are contained in fire-resistant boxes.
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Old 01-15-2014, 08:54 AM  
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Well if it's against code to splice a 6/3 cable then what's used to splice a 6/4 cable which is code compliant?
It think it should read a 6/2 and 6/3 cable. The ground does not count.
It is not against code to splice 6/2 cable. It is against code to extend the a 6/2 cable in a location where current code requires use of a 6/3 cable. A welder or 240 volt compressor for example do not require a neutral so it would not be a problem to extend a 6/2 cable in this case. A dryer or stove which requires a neutral would be a problem to extend a 6/2 cable.
To extend any cable you need a junction box with a cover in an accessible location.
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Old 01-15-2014, 10:18 AM  
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It think it should read a 6/2 and 6/3 cable. The ground does not count.
It is not against code to splice 6/2 cable. It is against code to extend the a 6/2 cable in a location where current code requires use of a 6/3 cable. A welder or 240 volt compressor for example do not require a neutral so it would not be a problem to extend a 6/2 cable in this case. A dryer or stove which requires a neutral would be a problem to extend a 6/2 cable.
To extend any cable you need a junction box with a cover in an accessible location.
This is about the clearest explanation I've seen on what you can and cannot do according to code. Thank you.

For the sake of running through all code-compliant options, can the OP then run a separate single conductor from the load center to the destination appliance to provide a neutral for his 6/2 cable?


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