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-   -   Repairing lamp - safety check please (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/repairing-lamp-safety-check-please-17277/)

tomsmyth 01-26-2014 11:25 AM

Repairing lamp - safety check please
 
Hi folks. I just finished replacing a desk lamp turn switch with one of these:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/261366459744...84.m1497.l2649

Just want to make sure I'm not doing anything unsafe.

Here is how I wired it up:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/...24118.jpg?dl=1

Then I put on some electric tape:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/...24524.jpg?dl=1

These things came off the old switch, I'm assuming they're like electric tape? I didn't put them back on because they're in such bad shape:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/...126_124800.jpg

I couldn't get the wire clamp back on where the wire goes into the housing, but there is a rigid connection below and it doesn't move much so I'm thinking I'm ok:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/...126_130222.jpg

How did I do? Thanks for looking!

JoeD 01-26-2014 11:47 AM

The tape was a waste of time. It will just fall off from the heat. You should have put high heat resistant insulators back on.

tomsmyth 01-26-2014 11:52 AM

Should I get new ones or can I re-use the burnt-looking ones?

JoeD 01-26-2014 03:50 PM

Reuse them. They look OK to me.

Wuzzat? 01-29-2014 04:00 PM

Use an Underwriter's Knot to strain relief the cord
and make sure that the socket shell connects to the long slot on the plug (the cord with the stripe or the ribs)
and that the lamp switch switches the other smooth conductor on the cord and that the cord wraps around the screw so that
as the screws tightens it wraps the wire tighter rather than tending to loosen the wire.

For long life observe max bulb wattage which may depend on the socket being below the bulb or above.

kok328 01-29-2014 04:05 PM

If you could not expose so much bare wire on your socket connections, it would be better.
Was there a cardboard tube that the socket slides into before putting it in the lamp?
Definitely reuse the insulators.
Make sure you end up with a the correct polarization with your plug wires.

tomsmyth 01-29-2014 05:27 PM

I love the underwriter's knot!

There is a tube for the socket and it's in there.

Why does polarity matter for a lamp?

How do I determine which wire goes on the brass socket terminal and which on the silver?

Thanks all!

nealtw 01-29-2014 05:37 PM

The plug has one blade bigger than the other. The wire from the smaller blade should go the gold screw.
You want the power to go to the center of the plug, wired backwards the threaded part can be live while you are changing bulbs even with the switch off.

Wuzzat? 01-29-2014 08:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wuzzat? (Post 99395)
Use an Underwriter's Knot to strain relief the cord
and make sure that the socket shell connects to the long slot on the plug (the cord with the stripe or the ribs)
and that the lamp switch switches the other smooth conductor on the cord and that the cord wraps around the screw so that
as the screws tightens it wraps the wire tighter rather than tending to loosen the wire.

For long life observe max bulb wattage which may depend on the socket being below the bulb or above.

And even if you did everything wrong, or had a flipped coin decide this issues for you, the lamp would still 'work' for a while. :p

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomsmyth (Post 99400)
Why does polarity matter for a lamp?

It matters for grounded people who may touch the lamp shell which is more exposed that the lamp center contact.

tomsmyth 01-30-2014 06:05 AM

Well I like to think of myself as a grounded person so I better fix this for sure! :P


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