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-   -   Starting to re-wire kitchen. (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/starting-re-wire-kitchen-1339/)

tooltime 09-13-2006 06:23 PM

Starting to re-wire kitchen.
 
1st Eelectrical group in kitchen.

Well, here goes I think.
below is a diagram for wiring up some outlets, primarily on a center wall in my house.
#'s 2 and 4 are facing on the outside wall (Living room). #'s 5 & 6 primarily appliances (toaster, coffe pot, can opener, blender). #3 is for water dispenser. #7 & 8 On sepreate wall, but not really expecting very much use on them as they will be on the wall w/ the dining table.
As you can see, I start the circuit off with a GFI, then to another outlet, then into a junction box and split. Im fairly sure the entire circuit will be protected by the GFI, but not positive. I have read that the circuit cannot be shared, so will #2 & 4 need to be tied into the living room circuit, or wil this be ok?
http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/264...elect01mo2.jpg

*Edit: There was a typo party going on

petey_racer 09-13-2006 09:39 PM

Circuits feeding receptacles in the kitchen and "related rooms" (pantry, nook, DR, etc) may NOT be shared with other rooms.
I would run two circuits for what you are doing, PLUS tying 2&4 to the existing LR circuit. If the LR is well loaded already I would bring a new circuit for that as well.

Also, I would not use a j-box. Just run from one receptacle to the next.

Remember, only receptacles serving kitchen counters require GFI protection.

Kerrylib 09-14-2006 04:40 PM

As far as I understand, Kitchen requires 2 circuits. (refer to electricians here to verify/comment). Don't some appliances require their own outlets as well, (microwave, dishwasher, disposal)?

As drawn (if wired correctly) the GFI will protect all downstream outlets.

Also I do know that as petey racer said, #2 and #4 outlets are not allowed. They will need to be wired into the living room circuit, or new circuit run.

petey_racer 09-14-2006 05:08 PM

Yes, many things do require, or are suggested, a dedicated circuit.

-If the micro is fixed, as in an over the range unit, dedicated circuit.
-Refer; definitely a suggested dedicated circuit. Can be 15 amp.
-DW; usually shares a 20a circuit with the disposal if present.
-ANY electric cooking appliance; dedicated. Can be shared with other untis but this is not at all recommended for a DIYer.

If this is a complete re-wire then yes, there is much more to the story than show in the diagram.

tooltime 09-14-2006 05:39 PM

Yes, there is more involved here I guess.. just trying to keep it simple. The entire houe was wired up on 4 or 5 14 gauge 2-wire circuits (no ground). I am in the process of running additional outlets in the kitchen using remodel boxes, and trying to keep the holes in the wall sot a minimum , and down below base cabinets if possible.
The stove and micro (mounted) will share a circuit.
The fridge will have its own.
Dishwasher/Disposal shared circuit with a switch for the disposal.
Some under cabinet lighting will be on a switch, with 3-4 outlets. Mostly for the small lights, but also for occasional slow cooker/ skillet use on the counter.


Not all the outlets will be in use, let alone 24/7. I would rather have the extras available, than being aggravated at not having enough. There were only a few existing.

There will be a separate area for the appliances as shown on the diagram above (#3/5/6) which will be a pair of low mounted wall cabinets.

petey_racer 09-14-2006 06:14 PM

Two things.

Yes, I forgot to mention. The micro CAN share a receptacle with an all gas range. This is fine.

You CANNOT share ANY lighting with kitchen receptacle circuits.
You can have "lighting only" switched receptacles though. Above the cabinets for example.

tooltime 09-15-2006 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by petey_racer
Two things.

Yes, I forgot to mention. The micro CAN share a receptacle with an all gas range. This is fine.

You CANNOT share ANY lighting with kitchen receptacle circuits.
You can have "lighting only" switched receptacles though. Above the cabinets for example.


No lighting? You mean no hard-wired lighinng right?
The undercabinet lighting I will be using is corded, much like a lamp, but it mounts under the cabinet (or wall I imagine).

An yes, my the range is gas, but still has electronic controls. It's really nice and I got a great deal on it :D

Kerrylib 09-18-2006 05:18 PM

I think your countertop outlet spacing is 4 ft maximum. Kitchen appliances come w/ a 2 ft cord. As you said, better to have more than you need and not use them, rather than the other way around.

When you lay out your outlets, I've heard a good idea is to alternate the cirucits so that if you have the toaster plugged into one outlet and a coffee maker in the next, they are on separate circuits. That way when you are making breakfast and the coffee maker is running along with the toaster (both of which pull a lot of current) you won't be loading the circuit to the max.

LOTS AND LOTS OF LUCK

I am seeing the same kind of work in my kitchen in the future. Total kitchen redo and replace aluminum wiring. Possibly move stove, etc. Major remodel, once the budget is there.


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