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-   -   Wall Oven Install - Pulling neutral from other circuit (http://www.houserepairtalk.com/f9/wall-oven-install-pulling-neutral-other-circuit-14673/)

OakHaven 09-01-2012 02:34 PM

Wall Oven Install - Pulling neutral from other circuit
 
I am replacing a double wall oven. The previous oven had the neutral wired into the uninsulated ground, since there was only the two hots and the ground available from the house. I understand that that used to be allowed, but not any more. I have an outlet (20A) for a microwave in the same cabinet that is not currently being used (but I might use it in the future). Can I pull a neutral from that box into the 220 circuit for the oven? (Both the box and the oven have 12 gauge wire for the neutral.) If I do, can I still use the outlet for a microwave at some later date? Should I disconnect the hot from microwave circuit from the panel? Thanks!

speedy petey 09-01-2012 02:38 PM

NO, you absolutely CANNOT do this!
Best is to run the proper circuit for the new oven.

OakHaven 09-01-2012 08:56 PM

Thanks for the reply. Is the problem with the gauge of the wire, or too much load for the neutral if I were to use it for the microwave. If I were to rewire it I would probably pull a new neutral for the oven, not a whole new set. Isn't that the same as using the neutral from the Romex to the microwave receptacle if I were to disconnect the hot from the panel?

speedy petey 09-02-2012 07:40 AM

There are several problems with this. One is the load on the neutral, another is the safety factor that the neutral carries current, and if it is disconnected it will most likely be live with voltage and can be a very serious shock hazard. Also, have two circuits using it you would have two sources for this to possibly occur.

You also CANNOT simply pull another wire for just the neutral. All the conductors of a circuit MUST be in the same conduit, cable or raceway.

Not to sound rude, but I truly think you need to read up a bit on residential wiring and get some of the basics down. All of your thoughts on this topic/job are incorrect and potentially very dangerous.

OakHaven 09-02-2012 10:23 AM

I appreciate your response, and it did not come across as rude. I understand that I have limited knowledge of these things. I was not aware that all of the conductors for a circuit needed to be in the same cable (conduit or raceway). I'm not sure that I understand the practical side of this, but am willing to accept it.


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