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Old 04-21-2010, 08:56 PM  
neel2004
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Default Wiring / Appliance Question

Hey all,

I noticed a few days ago that when I was cooking at my stove (located next to my refrigerator), that I would receive a shock if I leaned an arm on the fridge. I wouldn't get shocked every time, but it did happen enough that it was pretty annoying, and potentially dangerous if touched with a wet hand or wet skin.

I figured out that the 110v outlet that the fridge was plugged into has a open ground, so I plugged the fridge into another outlet with an extension cord (I know, not the best idea, but it's temporary till I am able to run a new ground wire).

I haven't been shocked by the fridge since, but I'm not sure if the problem is completely stopped.

Would the ground fault cause the exterior of the fridge to be electrified, or is there a deeper problem with the fridge wiring?

Thanks for your help ahead of time.



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Old 04-21-2010, 10:48 PM  
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http://personal.cha.bellsouth.net/j/o/johngd/files/rv/gfi.pdf Enjoy


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Old 04-22-2010, 12:49 AM  
frozenstar
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Originally Posted by neel2004 View Post
Hey all,

I noticed a few days ago that when I was cooking at my stove (located next to my refrigerator), that I would receive a shock if I leaned an arm on the fridge. I wouldn't get shocked every time, but it did happen enough that it was pretty annoying, and potentially dangerous if touched with a wet hand or wet skin.

I figured out that the 110v outlet that the fridge was plugged into has a open ground, so I plugged the fridge into another outlet with an extension cord (I know, not the best idea, but it's temporary till I am able to run a new ground wire).

I haven't been shocked by the fridge since, but I'm not sure if the problem is completely stopped.

Would the ground fault cause the exterior of the fridge to be electrified, or is there a deeper problem with the fridge wiring?

Thanks for your help ahead of time.
dang! I hate that feeling... I hate being grounded by any appliances!

Hope you can fix it with Cork-Guy's link...
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Old 04-22-2010, 08:05 AM  
Wuzzat?
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I assume your fridge has a ground pin on its plug?

Your fridge might be exempted from using a GFCI.

GFCIs don't get along with motors too well.

The current that went into you was probably due to the fridge motor windings having a capacitance to the motor housing/fridge shell and may not be strong enough [more than 10 milliamperes] to cause injury.

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Old 04-22-2010, 04:07 PM  
kok328
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Originally Posted by Wuzzat? View Post
I assume your fridge has a ground pin on its plug?

Your fridge might be exempted from using a GFCI.

GFCIs don't get along with motors too well.

The current that went into you was probably due to the fridge motor windings having a capacitance to the motor housing/fridge shell and may not be strong enough [more than 10 milliamperes] to cause injury.
To the best of my knowledge, all fridges are exempt because if the GFIC trips, you'll loose all your food from spoilage.
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Old 04-22-2010, 05:23 PM  
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To the best of my knowledge, all fridges are exempt because if the GFIC trips, you'll loose all your food from spoilage.
OK, so fixing the open ground will solve the problem.

0.1 µF of winding/shell capacitance will put about 5 mA into the ground lead, enough to feel.
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Old 05-05-2010, 09:25 PM  
triple D
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Default exempt???

the only reason the fridge does not have to be gfi is that it is not a counter top plug. you cant get to it when fridge is put in place.



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