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quackenbush 01-18-2013 11:16 AM

capacitor wiring Split Phase Cap Start Low HP
 
4 Attachment(s)

You don't need more than three wires, as one is common to both the run and start caps and the other two are the start and run which can be put across the electrolytic starts in parallel, i.e. to one pole of a jumper-paralleled group of plates or poles, and the other wire, i.e. the run wire can be put across one pole of the run cap. In the Baldor design I have, there are two windings, A and B. One is auxilary the other the main winding. Interestingly BOTH the start and run wires come from the auxilary winding and the common ALSO goes to the auxilary winding. The auxilary winding is NOT cut out in this design at all, but continues to work slightly off phase to the main winding, working with the smaller and lower MuF oil-based capacitor. What cuts out by centrifugal switch is just the large electrolytic capacitor bank and its wire, in the case the E wire or so called Start Wire. So the Start Wire and Run wire are in parallel going to the auxilary winding. So it is VERY difficult by multimeter to test which wire is which. You would practically have to pull the bell end of the motor to expose the centrifugal switch and trace the wires from before and after the switch by ohm meter to see which one is which. Resistance differences between O and E, Run and Start would be very low. Also since the O and E are dead short across each other in resistance test, the resistance therefore is very low, about 0.4 ohms as some have noted. Only across the Common Wire do the E and O wires cross the winding and thence does the resistance then show higher, about 2.6 ohms. Thus it should be clear which one is common, i.e. the one that supplies higher resistance to either test of E or O.

But which one is O and which E is often a mystery. Going back to L1 and L2 won't help, (the lead lines), as O and E are still in parallel -- and except for E going through a switch, the resistances would be near identical.

The Pic of the caps on the bench shows the jumpers correctly placed. Except for one wire which is not connected to the electrolytic they are completely wired as they should be. Except for the all important motor wiring.

The two large "Elecs" are jumpered across one plate side or bank with one jumper wire, and this "side" connects at one pole of the jumpered bank to the E or START wire from the motor, from the supplied motor wiring diagram -- and also we can see, from the uploaded the cap diagram.

All diagrams supplied by Baldor for the 3 HP FDL3610TM, or as they also called it, the Spec. No. 36H19W655. [Hard to look up Baldor numbers on the net on relatively "young" motors. The actual name plate model is not what I have and does not look up even on the Baldor site!! Not that difficult to keep manuals on line or old motor numbers. Seems like a corporate cluster F policy for old customers. Had my fill of that with many a boat anchor that was otherwise useful.]

The RUN wire (O) connects to the smaller, smaller-capacitance oil-based capacitor at the one bank which is NOT jumpered.

The COMMON [motor] wire, which connects to the auxilary winding in series, connects to one bank of ALL THREE capacitors, which are jumpered by two wires.

The START wire, or E wire in the diagram, [remember E is in parallel to the O or the RUN wire -- i.e. are opposite capacitor plate to the common-wire connections], and this START motor wire, labeled E in the wiring diagram, connects to a pole which is jumpered by a single wire across the two larger Electrolytics.

1. The RUN wire (O) is "by itself" on a naked pole on the small oil-based RUN cap.

2. The START wire (E) is on the electrolytics at a jumpered terminal.

If you reverse the START and RUN wires positions, the RUN wire would be switched and the START wire permanent and you will burn out an Electrolytic START capacitor in a few seconds. You can't tell reliably which is which wire without non-forthcoming-from-Baldor-engineering, wire labeling, colouring, or build info which is clear and unambiguous, so one HAS to trace wires inside the motor from the centrifugal switch.

Not nice at all.

The Muf of the START caps, the Elecs, is 216-259 Muf, at max 250 volts. The Oil based RUN cap is 25 MuF and max 370 volts.

There may be a way to detect which is which by ohmeter so I am open to suggestions, but it must be remembered that there is only one winding which can be tested in this model as the auxilary winding is NOT switched out just the START caps. Even with a switched-out auxilary winding, it would appear that all designs may not show a resistance difference between the START and RUN wires that is significant. My questions is whether the centrifugal switch shows a resistance difference between O and E or not. Don't know for sure.

EC<:->


quackenbush 01-18-2013 11:16 AM

capacitor wiring Split Phase Cap Start Low HP
 
4 Attachment(s)

You don't need more than three wires, as one is common to both the run and start caps and the other two are the start and run which can be put across the electrolytic starts in parallel, i.e. to one pole of a jumper-paralleled group of plates or poles, and the other wire, i.e. the run wire can be put across one pole of the run cap. In the Baldor design I have, there are two windings, A and B. One is auxilary the other the main winding. Interestingly BOTH the start and run wires come from the auxilary winding and the common ALSO goes to the auxilary winding. The auxilary winding is NOT cut out in this design at all, but continues to work slightly off phase to the main winding, working with the smaller and lower MuF oil-based capacitor. What cuts out by centrifugal switch is just the large electrolytic capacitor bank and its wire, in the case the E wire or so called Start Wire. So the Start Wire and Run wire are in parallel going to the auxilary winding. So it is VERY difficult by multimeter to test which wire is which. You would practically have to pull the bell end of the motor to expose the centrifugal switch and trace the wires from before and after the switch by ohm meter to see which one is which. Resistance differences between O and E, Run and Start would be very low. Also since the O and E are dead short across each other in resistance test, the resistance therefore is very low, about 0.4 ohms as some have noted. Only across the Common Wire do the E and O wires cross the winding and thence does the resistance then show higher, about 2.6 ohms. Thus it should be clear which one is common, i.e. the one that supplies higher resistance to either test of E or O.

But which one is O and which E is often a mystery. Going back to L1 and L2 won't help, (the lead lines), as O and E are still in parallel -- and except for E going through a switch, the resistances would be near identical.

The Pic of the caps on the bench shows the jumpers correctly placed. Except for one wire which is not connected to the electrolytic they are completely wired as they should be. Except for the all important motor wiring.

The two large "Elecs" are jumpered across one plate side or bank with one jumper wire, and this "side" connects at one pole of the jumpered bank to the E or START wire from the motor, from the supplied motor wiring diagram -- and also we can see, from the uploaded the cap diagram.

All diagrams supplied by Baldor for the 3 HP FDL3610TM, or as they also called it, the Spec. No. 36H19W655. [Hard to look up Baldor numbers on the net on relatively "young" motors. The actual name plate model is not what I have and does not look up even on the Baldor site!! Not that difficult to keep manuals on line or old motor numbers. Seems like a corporate cluster F policy for old customers. Had my fill of that with many a boat anchor that was otherwise useful.]

The RUN wire (O) connects to the smaller, smaller-capacitance oil-based capacitor at the one bank which is NOT jumpered.

The COMMON [motor] wire, which connects to the auxilary winding in series, connects to one bank of ALL THREE capacitors, which are jumpered by two wires.

The START wire, or E wire in the diagram, [remember E is in parallel to the O or the RUN wire -- i.e. are opposite capacitor plate to the common-wire connections], and this START motor wire, labeled E in the wiring diagram, connects to a pole which is jumpered by a single wire across the two larger Electrolytics.

1. The RUN wire (O) is "by itself" on a naked pole on the small oil-based RUN cap.

2. The START wire (E) is on the electrolytics at a jumpered terminal.

If you reverse the START and RUN wires positions, the RUN wire would be switched and the START wire permanent and you will burn out an Electrolytic START capacitor in a few seconds. You can't tell reliably which is which wire without non-forthcoming-from-Baldor-engineering, wire labeling, colouring, or build info which is clear and unambiguous, so one HAS to trace wires inside the motor from the centrifugal switch.

Not nice at all.

The Muf of the START caps, the Elecs, is 216-259 Muf, at max 250 volts. The Oil based RUN cap is 25 MuF and max 370 volts.

There may be a way to detect which is which by ohmeter so I am open to suggestions, but it must be remembered that there is only one winding which can be tested in this model as the auxilary winding is NOT switched out just the START caps. Even with a switched-out auxilary winding, it would appear that all designs may not show a resistance difference between the START and RUN wires that is significant. My questions is whether the centrifugal switch shows a resistance difference between O and E or not. Don't know for sure.

EC<:->


quackenbush 01-18-2013 11:16 AM

capacitor wiring Split Phase Cap Start Low HP
 
4 Attachment(s)

You don't need more than three wires, as one is common to both the run and start caps and the other two are the start and run which can be put across the electrolytic starts in parallel, i.e. to one pole of a jumper-paralleled group of plates or poles, and the other wire, i.e. the run wire can be put across one pole of the run cap. In the Baldor design I have, there are two windings, A and B. One is auxilary the other the main winding. Interestingly BOTH the start and run wires come from the auxilary winding and the common ALSO goes to the auxilary winding. The auxilary winding is NOT cut out in this design at all, but continues to work slightly off phase to the main winding, working with the smaller and lower MuF oil-based capacitor. What cuts out by centrifugal switch is just the large electrolytic capacitor bank and its wire, in the case the E wire or so called Start Wire. So the Start Wire and Run wire are in parallel going to the auxilary winding. So it is VERY difficult by multimeter to test which wire is which. You would practically have to pull the bell end of the motor to expose the centrifugal switch and trace the wires from before and after the switch by ohm meter to see which one is which. Resistance differences between O and E, Run and Start would be very low. Also since the O and E are dead short across each other in resistance test, the resistance therefore is very low, about 0.4 ohms as some have noted. Only across the Common Wire do the E and O wires cross the winding and thence does the resistance then show higher, about 2.6 ohms. Thus it should be clear which one is common, i.e. the one that supplies higher resistance to either test of E or O.

But which one is O and which E is often a mystery. Going back to L1 and L2 won't help, (the lead lines), as O and E are still in parallel -- and except for E going through a switch, the resistances would be near identical.

The Pic of the caps on the bench shows the jumpers correctly placed. Except for one wire which is not connected to the electrolytic they are completely wired as they should be. Except for the all important motor wiring.

The two large "Elecs" are jumpered across one plate side or bank with one jumper wire, and this "side" connects at one pole of the jumpered bank to the E or START wire from the motor, from the supplied motor wiring diagram -- and also we can see, from the uploaded the cap diagram.

All diagrams supplied by Baldor for the 3 HP FDL3610TM, or as they also called it, the Spec. No. 36H19W655. [Hard to look up Baldor numbers on the net on relatively "young" motors. The actual name plate model is not what I have and does not look up even on the Baldor site!! Not that difficult to keep manuals on line or old motor numbers. Seems like a corporate cluster F policy for old customers. Had my fill of that with many a boat anchor that was otherwise useful.]

The RUN wire (O) connects to the smaller, smaller-capacitance oil-based capacitor at the one bank which is NOT jumpered.

The COMMON [motor] wire, which connects to the auxilary winding in series, connects to one bank of ALL THREE capacitors, which are jumpered by two wires.

The START wire, or E wire in the diagram, [remember E is in parallel to the O or the RUN wire -- i.e. are opposite capacitor plate to the common-wire connections], and this START motor wire, labeled E in the wiring diagram, connects to a pole which is jumpered by a single wire across the two larger Electrolytics.

1. The RUN wire (O) is "by itself" on a naked pole on the small oil-based RUN cap.

2. The START wire (E) is on the electrolytics at a jumpered terminal.

If you reverse the START and RUN wires positions, the RUN wire would be switched and the START wire permanent and you will burn out an Electrolytic START capacitor in a few seconds. You can't tell reliably which is which wire without non-forthcoming-from-Baldor-engineering, wire labeling, colouring, or build info which is clear and unambiguous, so one HAS to trace wires inside the motor from the centrifugal switch.

Not nice at all.

The Muf of the START caps, the Elecs, is 216-259 Muf, at max 250 volts. The Oil based RUN cap is 25 MuF and max 370 volts.

There may be a way to detect which is which by ohmeter so I am open to suggestions, but it must be remembered that there is only one winding which can be tested in this model as the auxilary winding is NOT switched out just the START caps. Even with a switched-out auxilary winding, it would appear that all designs may not show a resistance difference between the START and RUN wires that is significant. My questions is whether the centrifugal switch shows a resistance difference between O and E or not. Don't know for sure.

EC<:->


quackenbush 01-18-2013 11:16 AM

capacitor wiring Split Phase Cap Start Low HP
 
4 Attachment(s)

You don't need more than three wires, as one is common to both the run and start caps and the other two are the start and run which can be put across the electrolytic starts in parallel, i.e. to one pole of a jumper-paralleled group of plates or poles, and the other wire, i.e. the run wire can be put across one pole of the run cap. In the Baldor design I have, there are two windings, A and B. One is auxilary the other the main winding. Interestingly BOTH the start and run wires come from the auxilary winding and the common ALSO goes to the auxilary winding. The auxilary winding is NOT cut out in this design at all, but continues to work slightly off phase to the main winding, working with the smaller and lower MuF oil-based capacitor. What cuts out by centrifugal switch is just the large electrolytic capacitor bank and its wire, in the case the E wire or so called Start Wire. So the Start Wire and Run wire are in parallel going to the auxilary winding. So it is VERY difficult by multimeter to test which wire is which. You would practically have to pull the bell end of the motor to expose the centrifugal switch and trace the wires from before and after the switch by ohm meter to see which one is which. Resistance differences between O and E, Run and Start would be very low. Also since the O and E are dead short across each other in resistance test, the resistance therefore is very low, about 0.4 ohms as some have noted. Only across the Common Wire do the E and O wires cross the winding and thence does the resistance then show higher, about 2.6 ohms. Thus it should be clear which one is common, i.e. the one that supplies higher resistance to either test of E or O.

But which one is O and which E is often a mystery. Going back to L1 and L2 won't help, (the lead lines), as O and E are still in parallel -- and except for E going through a switch, the resistances would be near identical.

The Pic of the caps on the bench shows the jumpers correctly placed. Except for one wire which is not connected to the electrolytic they are completely wired as they should be. Except for the all important motor wiring.

The two large "Elecs" are jumpered across one plate side or bank with one jumper wire, and this "side" connects at one pole of the jumpered bank to the E or START wire from the motor, from the supplied motor wiring diagram -- and also we can see, from the uploaded the cap diagram.

All diagrams supplied by Baldor for the 3 HP FDL3610TM, or as they also called it, the Spec. No. 36H19W655. [Hard to look up Baldor numbers on the net on relatively "young" motors. The actual name plate model is not what I have and does not look up even on the Baldor site!! Not that difficult to keep manuals on line or old motor numbers. Seems like a corporate cluster F policy for old customers. Had my fill of that with many a boat anchor that was otherwise useful.]

The RUN wire (O) connects to the smaller, smaller-capacitance oil-based capacitor at the one bank which is NOT jumpered.

The COMMON [motor] wire, which connects to the auxilary winding in series, connects to one bank of ALL THREE capacitors, which are jumpered by two wires.

The START wire, or E wire in the diagram, [remember E is in parallel to the O or the RUN wire -- i.e. are opposite capacitor plate to the common-wire connections], and this START motor wire, labeled E in the wiring diagram, connects to a pole which is jumpered by a single wire across the two larger Electrolytics.

1. The RUN wire (O) is "by itself" on a naked pole on the small oil-based RUN cap.

2. The START wire (E) is on the electrolytics at a jumpered terminal.

If you reverse the START and RUN wires positions, the RUN wire would be switched and the START wire permanent and you will burn out an Electrolytic START capacitor in a few seconds. You can't tell reliably which is which wire without non-forthcoming-from-Baldor-engineering, wire labeling, colouring, or build info which is clear and unambiguous, so one HAS to trace wires inside the motor from the centrifugal switch.

Not nice at all.

The Muf of the START caps, the Elecs, is 216-259 Muf, at max 250 volts. The Oil based RUN cap is 25 MuF and max 370 volts.

There may be a way to detect which is which by ohmeter so I am open to suggestions, but it must be remembered that there is only one winding which can be tested in this model as the auxilary winding is NOT switched out just the START caps. Even with a switched-out auxilary winding, it would appear that all designs may not show a resistance difference between the START and RUN wires that is significant. My questions is whether the centrifugal switch shows a resistance difference between O and E or not. Don't know for sure.

EC<:->



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