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Old 10-03-2017, 11:44 AM  
farmerjohn1324
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Originally Posted by Snoonyb View Post
RECEP=RECEPTICLE, IE. a device you plug something into.

So, there are 2 ROMEX each with a black, white and copper CONDUCTORS.One is connected to a switch, and is presumedly a SWITCH LEG and operates the light fixture, and the other is connected to the RECEP., and is presumedly the HOT PAIR, which is not energized.

Were you able to connect the aforementioned "black" conductor to a breaker and find out what was energized?
There is only 1 sheathing connected to the outlet. 2 to the switch.

The switch and outlet are not connected. I've looked at every switch and outlet on that half of the house and can't find what powers the outlet.

I tried connecting the loose wire in the panel and that wasn't it.


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Old 10-03-2017, 02:20 PM  
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There is only 1 sheathing connected to the outlet. 2 to the switch.

The switch and outlet are not connected. I've looked at every switch and outlet on that half of the house and can't find what powers the outlet.

I tried connecting the loose wire in the panel and that wasn't it.
Of the 2 romex that are involved with the switch, is 1 of them the hot pair?


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Old 10-03-2017, 03:16 PM  
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Of the 2 romex that are involved with the switch, is 1 of them the hot pair?
Yes, and the other goes to the fixture. It's working fine.
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:02 PM  
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Yes, and the other goes to the fixture. It's working fine.
Here are your 2 options; you can purchase a FLUKE circuit tracer for about $70 and trace the conductors presently connected to the recp. that doesn't work to where the circuit is interrupted. OR, purchase a GFCI recep., because it's in a bathroom, a black, white and grnd. pigtails, 3 yellow and 2 red wirenuts to connect the GFCI too the hot pair, and to also safe off the non working conductors presently disconnected from the non-working recep.
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:27 PM  
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Here are your 2 options; you can purchase a FLUKE circuit tracer for about $70 and trace the conductors presently connected to the recp. that doesn't work to where the circuit is interrupted. OR, purchase a GFCI recep., because it's in a bathroom, a black, white and grnd. pigtails, 3 yellow and 2 red wirenuts to connect the GFCI too the hot pair, and to also safe off the non working conductors presently disconnected from the non-working recep.
I understood the first part. Would need to see a picture for the second.
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Old 10-03-2017, 04:33 PM  
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I understood the first part. Would need to see a picture for the second.
I think he meant, you don't need or want the gfci to take out the lights and fan so you just pigtail them all and go to the line side.
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Old 10-03-2017, 05:40 PM  
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I understood the first part. Would need to see a picture for the second.
Understand that this is a temporary fix as the use of the GFCI may well cause an overload, circuit failure and loss of lighting.

I don't do pictures, so I'll describe it for you;With the breaker off, Disconnect the black conductor of the hot pair from the switch and straighten it, strip and connect 2 black pigtails too the black conductor of the hot pair by twisting them together with a plier and capping with a red wirenut, connect the other striped end of 1 of the black pigtails to the switch, connect the striped end of the other black pigtail to the hot/black of the GFCI.

Remove the wirenut from the white conductors, connect the striped end of the white pigtail to the other white conductors, also twisting together with a plier and cap with a red wirenut, connect the other end of the striped white conductor at the white/neutral connection of the GFCI.

Connect the grnd. pigtail to the grnds. connected to the switch and then to the grnd screw on the GFCI.

Turn the breaker back on, press the TEST/RESET on the GFCI
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Old 11-10-2017, 01:58 PM  
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After doing some research, I have pretty much determined that if I replace the GFCI, it should fix 2, if not 3, of the outlets.

I am going to replace the mobile home stab-in outlets with regular outlets. What kind of plastic box do I need to make this safe?

http://www.homedepot.com/p/1-Gang-No...FcZQhgodlQ4OEQ

Is this right? Or do I need something like this...

http://www.homedepot.com/p/1-Gang-18...Fc0ahgodpokOwQ
Any box that will contain a receptacle, switch, or splice of the 120/240 volt wiring must completely enclose the connections on the back and all four sides. The front of the box needs to be within 1/8 inch of the exposed surface of a non combustible wall finish such as plaster board (Sheet Rock tm). If the wall surface is combustible then the front edge of the box must be actually flush with the combustible surface or protrude out beyond that surface. There must be no pathway between the connections and any combustible part of the structure for a spark from a failed connection to ignite the combustible material. The entire purpose of electrical boxes is to enclose connections so that sparks cannot ignite combustible materials.

Every wire that passes through a box without a splice, every wire that enters the box and terminates in the box, and every device mounted in that box "Owns" some space inside the box that cannot be shared with the other wires or devices. The amount of space is matched to the size of the wire and to twice the space for the largest wire that terminates on any one device or devices that are all on the same mounting strap or yoke. If the wires in those boxes are size 14 American Wire Gauge (AWG) then you must have 2.0 cubic inches for each wire and 4.0 cubic inches for each mounting strap or yoke that one of those 14 AWG wires terminates on. Using the box in the second link above as an example it has 18 cubic inches of interior space. All of the Equipment Grounding Conductors (EGCs) count as One single wire, 18-2=16. Three cables with a total of six insulated current carrying conductors require 12 cubic inches 16-12=4. The device mounted in that box that has nothing larger than 14 AWG wires terminated to it requires 4 cubic inches of space 4-4=0. So that box could hold Six wires, Three EGCs counting as a single wire, and one strap or yoke on which #14 AWG conductors terminate.

The problem will be that the walls in most manufactured homes are only ~2&5/8 inches thick including the sheathing on both sides. That makes the only type of box that is practical to install a 4 inches square by 1&1/2 inches deep with a 5/8 inch deep inch plaster ring on it's front to provide the correct size opening for one or two devices. Then you have to plaster over the plaster ring to hide all that work. Since you are working in already built wall you will need to cut out enough plasterboard to install standard boxes. In order to actually get a large enough wiring compartment to hold two cables and a plug the box used must have 14 cubic inches of interior space. I think that your best way out is to locate the edge of a stud, cut out the opening for a 4 inch square box, add the cable clamps to the two cables, work the two cables into the box, fasten the box in place, and add the plaster ring. Then you have to plaster over the plaster ring to hide all that work.
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Old 11-10-2017, 02:03 PM  
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Default How thick are the wall studs?

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1-Gang 14 cu. in. Old Work Box

you will need wire nuts, and some wire
I use black tape over my wire nuts even though it is not required
If that box is over 2 inches deep it will not fit in 1&5/8 inch studded wall.
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Last edited by hornetd; 11-10-2017 at 02:34 PM. Reason: To insert the original picture
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Old 11-10-2017, 02:45 PM  
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Originally Posted by hornetd View Post
Any box that will contain a receptacle, switch, or splice of the 120/240 volt wiring must completely enclose the connections on the back and all four sides. The front of the box needs to be within 1/8 inch of the exposed surface of a non combustible wall finish such as plaster board (Sheet Rock tm). If the wall surface is combustible then the front edge of the box must be actually flush with the combustible surface or protrude out beyond that surface. There must be no pathway between the connections and any combustible part of the structure for a spark from a failed connection to ignite the combustible material. The entire purpose of electrical boxes is to enclose connections so that sparks cannot ignite combustible materials.

Every wire that passes through a box without a splice, every wire that enters the box and terminates in the box, and every device mounted in that box "Owns" some space inside the box that cannot be shared with the other wires or devices. The amount of space is matched to the size of the wire and to twice the space for the largest wire that terminates on any one device or devices that are all on the same mounting strap or yoke. If the wires in those boxes are size 14 American Wire Gauge (AWG) then you must have 2.0 cubic inches for each wire and 4.0 cubic inches for each mounting strap or yoke that one of those 14 AWG wires terminates on. Using the box in the second link above as an example it has 18 cubic inches of interior space. All of the Equipment Grounding Conductors (EGCs) count as One single wire, 18-2=16. Three cables with a total of six insulated current carrying conductors require 12 cubic inches 16-12=4. The device mounted in that box that has nothing larger than 14 AWG wires terminated to it requires 4 cubic inches of space 4-4=0. So that box could hold Six wires, Three EGCs counting as a single wire, and one strap or yoke on which #14 AWG conductors terminate.

The problem will be that the walls in most manufactured homes are only ~2&5/8 inches thick including the sheathing on both sides. That makes the only type of box that is practical to install a 4 inches square by 1&1/2 inches deep with a 5/8 inch deep inch plaster ring on it's front to provide the correct size opening for one or two devices. Then you have to plaster over the plaster ring to hide all that work. Since you are working in already built wall you will need to cut out enough plasterboard to install standard boxes. In order to actually get a large enough wiring compartment to hold two cables and a plug the box used must have 14 cubic inches of interior space. I think that your best way out is to locate the edge of a stud, cut out the opening for a 4 inch square box, add the cable clamps to the two cables, work the two cables into the box, fasten the box in place, and add the plaster ring. Then you have to plaster over the plaster ring to hide all that work.
These have been referred to him;

https://www.homedepot.com/p/1-Gang-1...8-6R/202664424

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Carlon-1...RSWR/202077341


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