DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Roofing and Siding > Best Way to Deal With a Slipery Roof??




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Old 10-05-2017, 03:08 PM  
voyager
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OK guys, I think you've missed the point completely.
It's my fault for not being very clear in what I was trying point out.

The ladder is on the other side of the house and cannot be seen in the photo.
Because I used the fall protection while I was trying to exit the wet slippery roof, it's also on the other side of the roof and cannot be seen either.
I had used the safety rope hand over hand to keep my weight centered over my feet while crossing the slippery section to get to the ladder.

I do not use the power washer from the ladder, too awkward and inefficient.
I do wear the harness even while far from the edges so that I'm wearing it as I near the edges, not needing to continually don and doff it.
Although, I do normally take it off before approaching the ladder to exit the roof.
Getting into and out of it on the ladder is too awkward.
I don and doff the harness while standing near the ridge line.

By not clearing the alge from the roof to form a path to the ladder, I made accessing the ladder a bit risky when the roof was wetted by rain fall.
Then, the washer ran out of gas before the path to the ladder was cleared.

The moral of the story:
I should have not relied on the idea that I would be accessing the ladder only on a dry roof.
The first thing I should have done is to have cleaned a path to and from the ladder.
Murphy's Law raised it's ugly head when the sprayer ran out of gas.
I didn't explain it very clearly in my previous post.

I got a little more done yesterday before it began to rain again.
The newly cleaned path to the ladder is very nice to walk on even when the roof is wet.


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Last edited by voyager; 10-05-2017 at 03:35 PM.
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Old 10-05-2017, 04:00 PM  
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I would run a cable from end to end at the peak so you could use a set length rope so there is no chance of getting to the edge. I would have the ladder on the side of the house just below the peak or at the peak.
http://www.certifix.co.nz/


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Old 10-05-2017, 04:22 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
I would run a cable from end to end at the peak so you could use a set length rope so there is no chance of getting to the edge. I would have the ladder on the side of the house just below the peak or at the peak.
http://www.certifix.co.nz/
That is a very good fall protection method for a commercial application, especially one that needs to meet government regulations for use by employees.
The costs for that system would reflect that type of intended use.
I consider it to be way over done for a permanent, owner used, residential application.

EDIT:

The gear I'm using for this:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Werner-Ro...1201/203907961
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Qualcraft...0561/205533965

With 6 anchors [3 on each side] on that ell of the house, it is much safer and easier to use than the climbing gear I've used in outdoor activities such as crevasse rescue during glacier travel, which could easily be adapted to this use.

Last edited by voyager; 10-05-2017 at 05:06 PM.
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Old 10-05-2017, 04:57 PM  
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I still advise moving the ladder to the side and setting it at the ridge. That way you are not walking up a slippery roof to attach your fall protection, just my 2 cents.
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Old 10-05-2017, 05:12 PM  
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I thank you folks for your concern and advice. But, I am not looking for advice. I am merely letting you know how the project is advancing and the hiccups that I'm running into in case anyone else can benefit from my experience, or point their finger and laugh if that's what they'd prefer.

EDIT:
I had made an edit reply that got lost when I had to log in again before finishing. I thought it was in an above post when I made my above reply.

Now that the alge is removed for access to the ladder, with the shoes I'm using, the clean portion of the roof is not slippery even when wet.

I like the ladder set up I'm using.
To access the ridge would necessitate a much longer ladder. I have no other need for a longer ladder except for your recommendation.
Plus, a slip from the ladder at the ridge would pull you to the side, away from the ladder. A slip at the location I'm using would simply send you back towards the ladder making self recovery easier.
The extra length of the ladder gives me stability when accessing the roof from the ladder, or the ladder from the roof.
You can't see it, but the ladder is tied to the roof trusses with a heavy seine twine. It cannot move from side to side or away from the roof edge.
If I were to slip when approaching the ladder, the ladder would stop me from going over the edge.
As long as one does not step on a rung above the ladder's contact point with the roof and keeps their weight centered over their feet
mounting the roof or the ladder is stable.

Last edited by voyager; 10-05-2017 at 06:12 PM.
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Old 10-05-2017, 05:35 PM  
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Then I won't tell you why our WCB will not allow us to use that system unless you are more than ten ft off the ground.
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Old 10-06-2017, 03:10 AM  
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Hi nealtw,
I fully understand why the WCB has much more stringent requirements on what types of safety gear an employer is required to provide for an employee.

Some employers would send an employee up with nothing for protection while insisting that they take extreme unneeded risks. Many employees [most in my opinion] haven't got a lick of common sense in how to deal with even mildly risky situations. More stringent requirements are necessary for dealing with the multitudes, or there would be bodies scattered all over every work site.
My experiences bear those views out.

I have been an employee, an employer, and self employed in a one-man, start to finish [bidding to final inspection], operation working only spec'ed government contracts as a 2nd tier sub. The only residential I've worked in the last 30 years is my own home.

Last edited by voyager; 10-06-2017 at 03:19 AM.
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Old 10-06-2017, 10:01 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voyager View Post
Hi nealtw,
I fully understand why the WCB has much more stringent requirements on what types of safety gear an employer is required to provide for an employee.

Some employers would send an employee up with nothing for protection while insisting that they take extreme unneeded risks. Many employees [most in my opinion] haven't got a lick of common sense in how to deal with even mildly risky situations. More stringent requirements are necessary for dealing with the multitudes, or there would be bodies scattered all over every work site.
My experiences bear those views out.

I have been an employee, an employer, and self employed in a one-man, start to finish [bidding to final inspection], operation working only spec'ed government contracts as a 2nd tier sub. The only residential I've worked in the last 30 years is my own home.
Nope, we use the same system here.

Thew problem is if you are not ten feet off the ground, you will hit the ground before it stops you.

I can explain.
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Old 10-22-2017, 04:12 PM  
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Hi neiltw,
I do understand your concern.

i think I've said it before, but maybe I have just thought it and not said it.
I use the safety gear as fall prevention, not fall mitigation.
I use it to limit my closeness to the edges not to stop me after going over the edge.
I am aware of the 10' drop distance.
I have no intention of doing a 10' drop, or more , or less.
I never get closer to the edge than an arm length plus the length of the spray wand while the lanyard is under tension.

So, anyway, onto other things.
I am almost done with the cleaning of the roof.
The roof is in good condition except for one area.
I'd like to show that for advice on how to deal with it in it's own thread.


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