DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Framing and Foundation > New Footing Method




Help Support House Repair Talk by donating using the link above.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-07-2017, 03:48 PM  
Sparky617
Member
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cary (Raleigh), NC
Posts: 754
Liked 255 Times on 203 Posts
Likes Given: 158

Default New Footing Method

I was watching This Old House the other day and they were using a new footing that didn't require digging down below the frost line in Mass, where it is typically 48". It is on the video at the link at around 5 minutes.

https://www.thisoldhouse.com/watch/n...all-decked-out

Around here our footings only need to be 12" for most structures assuming you land on undisturbed earth. If you're on fill it can be a lot deeper. Has anyone seen these in use in real life? Looks like a neat concept.


Sparky617 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2017, 04:19 PM  
nealtw
Contractor retired
 
nealtw's Avatar
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Posts: 23,349
Liked 2915 Times on 2556 Posts
Likes Given: 4800

Default

They have been approved in a few states for decks and sheds, haven't seen them out here.


nealtw is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2017, 10:23 PM  
mudmixer
Contractor
 
mudmixer's Avatar
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: St. Paul/Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 662
Liked 74 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 65

Default

There could be a problem if the uplift from frost is considered.

The biggest foundation area is the concrete center-piece that will get frost under it while the lower soil could still be damp and provide no resistance for the "spider-legs" that can be raised or bend.

Having the outer part of a deck heave upward in comparison to a house with proper footings is not very functional.

The ground freezes from the top down, so the "cute" concept of spreading out the possible vertical support does not affect uplift.

Dick
mudmixer is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2017, 10:39 PM  
nealtw
Contractor retired
 
nealtw's Avatar
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Posts: 23,349
Liked 2915 Times on 2556 Posts
Likes Given: 4800

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudmixer View Post
There could be a problem if the uplift from frost is considered.

The biggest foundation area is the concrete center-piece that will get frost under it while the lower soil could still be damp and provide no resistance for the "spider-legs" that can be raised or bend.

Having the outer part of a deck heave upward in comparison to a house with proper footings is not very functional.

The ground freezes from the top down, so the "cute" concept of spreading out the possible vertical support does not affect uplift.

Dick
It seems to be passing that test.
http://www.startribune.com/a-new-typ...ers/211348291/
nealtw is offline  
Sparky617 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2017, 07:27 AM  
Sparky617
Member
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cary (Raleigh), NC
Posts: 754
Liked 255 Times on 203 Posts
Likes Given: 158

Default

Thanks for the link Neal. TOH typically is willing to try out new products, new in this case is 10 years old. They may have just been approved in the town where the current project house is located.

I understand builders reluctance to try "new and improved" products because they have bitten them in the a-- too many times. Great products like aluminum branch wiring, Masonite siding, polybutylene plumbing, 1980's flame retardant plywood sheathing.
Sparky617 is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2017, 07:51 AM  
Chris
Guru of nothing
HRT_ADMIN.png
 
Chris's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Sweet, Idaho
Posts: 4,442
Liked 1002 Times on 746 Posts
Likes Given: 107

Default

I would think those pipes would rsut out over time? I know they are galvanized but that stuff doesn't last forever.
Chris is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-08-2017, 08:12 AM  
Sparky617
Member
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Cary (Raleigh), NC
Posts: 754
Liked 255 Times on 203 Posts
Likes Given: 158

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris View Post
I would think those pipes would rsut out over time? I know they are galvanized but that stuff doesn't last forever.
With limited exposure to air, they should last a very long time. Certainly longer than the wood posts installed on top of them.
Sparky617 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2017, 12:46 PM  
Chris
Guru of nothing
HRT_ADMIN.png
 
Chris's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Sweet, Idaho
Posts: 4,442
Liked 1002 Times on 746 Posts
Likes Given: 107

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky617 View Post
With limited exposure to air, they should last a very long time. Certainly longer than the wood posts installed on top of them.
But compared to a typical concrete footing, which is made to last longer? It's easy to take care of wood above ground or even replace if necessary, for most it is difficult to replace a footing.
Chris is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-09-2017, 01:20 PM  
nealtw
Contractor retired
 
nealtw's Avatar
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Posts: 23,349
Liked 2915 Times on 2556 Posts
Likes Given: 4800

Default

How long would you expect the gal. steel to last.
When was the last time you saw them taking down electrical transfer towers, or chain link fencing.
The very best treated lumber with a tag that I have ever seen said forty years.
nealtw is offline  
Sparky617 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 01:44 PM  
billshack
Junior Member
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 19
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

i think this might be O K in the usa, but here in canada where the frost goes to six feet or more , one year it went to 8 , i would not try it , also if you are a contractor until this stuff is accepted by the canadian building code you are leaving yourself open to lawsuits.
Bill


billshack is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
PEX Advice (Best Crimping Method?) aNYCdb Plumbing Forum 11 12-12-2016 10:52 AM
needed: removal method for old laminate cablechick General Home Improvement Discussion 6 01-12-2010 05:10 PM
Refinish tub method Jinglebob Plumbing Forum 1 11-15-2009 11:23 PM
Newbie here, need best floor installation method rdh Flooring 6 08-05-2009 03:15 AM
Best Method: Floor Demo dtenorio Flooring 2 08-15-2006 02:22 AM



Newest Threads