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Old 07-25-2017, 12:31 PM  
nealtw
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Originally Posted by Krich View Post
Hopefully Leviton knows what they are talking about and aren't screwing people with their claim that this unit provides "Exclusive V-shaped, serrated back-wiring clamps for superior contact"

Like a lot of things I guess, only time will tell...
Most houses are built with the cheapest of these.
Most people step up a grade when replacing them.
But now I am starting to think you have to be the resident expert as you are likely the only member to research outlets.


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Old 07-25-2017, 12:43 PM  
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I simply found the outlet on Amazon and read the description that Leviton provided. Pretty sure anybody that had any interest in this sort of thing could have done the same thing if one wants to considee that to be research.

In the automotive repair bidness it is common to look for upgrades and consider whether they perform better and last longer than stock.

If one is going to keep their vehicle long term, then it may be a good idea to do some upgrades. That is the premise I use when looking at anything that may need to be replaced.

I thought surely "medical grade" and "heavy duty" is bound to be a little better than the average wall plug and from what I've read from numerous sources (written by electricians and electrical engineers) these should be better.

So as time passes I guess I'll find out if they are or not.


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Old 07-25-2017, 01:21 PM  
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All I know if I stuck the wires in the back, tightened the screws down real good, and then I tried pulling the wires out to make sure they were secure
Krich what they are telling you is accurate, however, these hospital grade receptacles (wall plugs) have pressure plates which is what you described above that you used and not the typical "back stab" as some of the cheaper receptacles have. This is where the confusion lays.

If you go HERE it will show the different types of connections available on a receptacle.

What they have been saying about "back stabs" is absolutely accurate and not advised by any means. But there is a major difference in performance and durability (connection wise).

Although you place a wire into the back of the receptacle for both back stabs and pressure plates they are two totally different things.

A "back stab" is just a lever that holds the wire in place where as a pressure plate you place the conductor in between a pressure plate and the backing and then tighten down the screw which in turn sandwiches the conductor between the two (this is acceptable practice and I am sure this is what your receptacle has). Just the same as in a GFCI (well most of them at least).

Also the hospital grade receptacle will take far longer to wear out than a less expensive brand/type. They are made more rigid to allow more plugging in and pulling he plug out which wears the internal mechanism which may cause loose connection between the plug and receptacle and then may cause heating of the conductors/receptacle.
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If at any time you do not feel confident enough to perform a trouble shooting method that I suggest or feel you may not have the experience or comfort level to do so please ask questions before proceeding.
Electricity is dangerous and if not handled properly can cause serious injury or worse!

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Old 07-25-2017, 03:13 PM  
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On another note, changing the receptacle from 15amp to 20amp does not make a 20amp circuit.
You need to be sure it's a dedicated 12AWG wire from the panel to the plug.
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Old 07-25-2017, 04:20 PM  
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On another note, changing the receptacle from 15amp to 20amp does not make a 20amp circuit.
You need to be sure it's a dedicated 12AWG wire from the panel to the plug.
yes, correct but I think we are past that.

This is why me trying to follow up on a 3 week old post is so difficult. Have to read all the posts to remember what is going on. (hard to be helpful that way).

Short and simple.

14 gauge conductor (throughout circuit) - max 15 amp breaker.
12 gauage conductor (throughout circuit) - max 20 amp breaker
15 amp breaker 14 gauge conductor - max 15 amp receptacle (no can not put a 20amp receptacle on this circuit)
20 amp breaker 12 gauge conductor - max 20 amp receptacle (15 amp receptacle allowed)
receptacle - "back stab" a no-no (not advisable)
receptacle - pressure plate acceptable (advisable)

wow I am tired!
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If at any time you do not feel confident enough to perform a trouble shooting method that I suggest or feel you may not have the experience or comfort level to do so please ask questions before proceeding.
Electricity is dangerous and if not handled properly can cause serious injury or worse!
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Old 07-25-2017, 06:37 PM  
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Originally Posted by afjes_2016 View Post
Krich what they are telling you is accurate, however, these hospital grade receptacles (wall plugs) have pressure plates which is what you described above that you used and not the typical "back stab" as some of the cheaper receptacles have. This is where the confusion lays.

If you go HERE it will show the different types of connections available on a receptacle.

What they have been saying about "back stabs" is absolutely accurate and not advised by any means. But there is a major difference in performance and durability (connection wise).

Although you place a wire into the back of the receptacle for both back stabs and pressure plates they are two totally different things.

A "back stab" is just a lever that holds the wire in place where as a pressure plate you place the conductor in between a pressure plate and the backing and then tighten down the screw which in turn sandwiches the conductor between the two (this is acceptable practice and I am sure this is what your receptacle has). Just the same as in a GFCI (well most of them at least).

Also the hospital grade receptacle will take far longer to wear out than a less expensive brand/type. They are made more rigid to allow more plugging in and pulling he plug out which wears the internal mechanism which may cause loose connection between the plug and receptacle and then may cause heating of the conductors/receptacle.

Great post I typed pretty much the same information this morning in post #18.
I sometimes wonder if anyone reads them. Then we have a dozen posts debating something about the manufactures claim to have a good back clamping system that they do have it is clearly the third method I explained this morning and not a backstab.

Your link is a great tutorial if that doesn’t clear it up nothing will.

Again great post.
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Old 07-26-2017, 04:24 AM  
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Great post I typed pretty much the same information this morning in post #18.
I sometimes wonder if anyone reads them. Then we have a dozen posts debating something about the manufactures claim to have a good back clamping system that they do have it is clearly the third method I explained this morning and not a backstab.

Your link is a great tutorial if that doesn’t clear it up nothing will.

Again great post.
Thanks!

Yes, I did see your post #18 but I guess it maybe did not stand out as much as you had hoped; reasoning of my link that I posted.
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If at any time you do not feel confident enough to perform a trouble shooting method that I suggest or feel you may not have the experience or comfort level to do so please ask questions before proceeding.
Electricity is dangerous and if not handled properly can cause serious injury or worse!
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:16 AM  
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Have you gotten this taken care of ?

If not , since it is on a 20 amp circuit breaker & # 12 wire , I suggest you buy a 20 amp specification grade or commercial spec grade ( some what cheaper ) receptacle .

Hospital grade is not needed & over kill .

As long as nothing else is on that circuit , you should be fine with a 12,000 BTU A/C . I have 3 units running that way .

As for as voltage , best I remember , the receptacles are rater 125 VAC or 250 VAC . And there are a bunch other that you will not be dealing with .

Now , another question . Will you be trying to heat the garage ?

Lastly , consider a ductless mini split A/C if you are going to be running the A/C a lot . You can get mini splits in a lot higher energy efficiency rating and for a few dollars more , a heat pump version that both heats & cools .

They require installation , that may be beyond your skill set or tooling . We installed 2 , one in the living room & one in our bedroom .

Best of luck , :-)
Wyr
God bless


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