DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Carpentry and Woodworking > Looking to start, some advice please guys


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-20-2017, 02:37 AM  
J0sh
Junior Member
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 6
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Looking to start, some advice please guys

Hello House Repair talk forum,

I need to start off by saying that it is awesome to be here and that I am really looking forward to speaking with you all.

I have not long found a little extra time in my day to day life to do something that I want. To be honest I found this time from stopping drinking and I am needing something to replace the time with.

Anyway, When I was younger I remember doing woodwork at school and helping my father around the house fixing bits and bobs all over the place, great memories. I also remember loving working with wood and seeing the final project finished with huge satisfaction. I believe that this will be the right move for me to make not just to stop drinking but to also have some fun and get a little more out of my day to day life.

This is where I am going to need your guys help. At the moment my tool shed contains a hammer and a drill with a few extra gardening tools that are irrelevant. I know I am going to be needing a lot more than that but I'm not sure what. I first want to try and make a pretty simple TV stand with a shelf to hold a laptop underneath, something like in the link below but as I said I'm doing this myself. What tools would you guy suggest I get so I am able to complete this task? I'm not rich, so I will be building up my tools shed slowly so please be gentle with me guys
http://www.used.forsale/wooden-tv-stand
Thanks




Last edited by J0sh; 03-21-2017 at 08:51 PM.
J0sh is offline  
slownsteady Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 06:44 AM  
oldognewtrick
HRT_ADMIN.png
 
oldognewtrick's Avatar
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Nashville, TN
Posts: 10,464
Liked 1308 Times on 1045 Posts
Likes Given: 400

Default

Hello Josh, craigslist, garage and estate sales are great ways to find some additions to your tool shed. Start browsing the adds.


oldognewtrick is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 02:14 PM  
elbo
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: , florida
Posts: 187
Liked 78 Times on 60 Posts
Likes Given: 41

Default

you are aware that some of the frustrations you will face doing woodwork will drive you to drink, aren't you ?
No, seriously, Not knowing your financial means, but thinking you want some power tools, I would start with a hand held circular saw, as good a one as you can afford, battery drill/screwdriver, drill bits,and assorted hand tools. I'm sure others will add to this listpther
elbo is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 07:18 PM  
Mastercarpenty
Junior Member
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Upstate, SC
Posts: 189
Liked 87 Times on 70 Posts
Likes Given: 99

Default

Welcome to HouseRepairTalk and sobriety- I'm 13 years clean and I know you can do it too
Craigslist, yard sales, and looking for neighbors and new friends who might have tools for free or cheap wil get you a good start. To begin with on the cheap/free side, get what you can and take whatever you can get as long as it works. Better to have a crappy but working drill than no drill at all. If you can afford better, then spend that money on what you will use the most, beginning with a skilsaw and cordless drill. Also get a decent blade for the saw because the blade is doing the work moreso than the saw. Also get a speed-square which comes with a rafter-book; even if you never build a roof you'll learn about angles and the many other ways to use this tool plus it makes a great saw guide for square skilsaw cuts. My preferred blade is a Freud Diablo from the big orange store, very sharp with very clean cuts at a decent price

For the cordless drill I recommend nothing less than a brand-name 12V model; larger is better. The cheap no-name ones are junk with batteries that neither hold up while doing the work or last more than a few months. Right now lots of guys are upgrading and you might find good deals on older 18V tools- those will do anything you'll need them to and toy can still get new batteries for them. My preference is DeWalt and one of my 'secret sources' is MaxTool.com where factory refurbs, bare tools and 2 packs of 18V batteries go on sale often. All the major brands are there too.

You'll need drill bits and driver bits. As long as you avoid nails, the cheap paddle bits for wood work OK and can be sharpened with a file. For metalwork you need good bits; look for kits with brand names at the big-box stores when they're on sale. I like Milwaukee for screwdriver bits; not cheap but they last. Once again it's the bits that are going most of the work so good ones matter.

At this point, if your path is going toward finished items in-the-home you should consider a random-orbit sander. It will take much of the work out of sanding and refinishing projects. I don't know how I lived without one now. Here too a coping saw can make for nice curved cuts or a jigsaw can speed up that process. Don't scrimp on the jigsaw for doing fine work; the cheap ones wear out quickly and the cuts wont be true on the far side of the board. A good one is a lifetime investment if you treat it well and use it gently. Here too a miter saw can be wonderful to have. A 10" will do most of your work and used ones in good shape are fairly common and often cheap. Again stay with the better name brands.

A set of screwdrivers is usually cheaper than one of the good multi-bit jobs. An 8" adjustable wrench or larger is a good starting point. Vise-Grips are indispensable, and almost as useful are Channel-lock pliers. Nail-sets are a must; get Stanley if you can find them, the cheap ones are soft and die rapidly. Tape measures are kind of a personal preference but good prices can be found on the chrome Stanley ones since most folks now use their heavier-duty ones. Stanley also makes good chisels but unless you use them a lot a small set of cheaper ones will do OK- just keep them sharp and don't cut into any nails.

Yeah, that's a lot of stuff but you don't need all of it right now. Think about your upcoming projects ahead of time and get the tools as you need them. And keep some 'spending money' on hand to catch tools you want when they are on sale. Scrounge the 'clearance' shelves and don't buy on impulse alone- get only whay you know you will need and use.

In time you'll know which way to go on your own and you'll build up to having a nice shop with nice tools to build nice things with. None of us got where we are in a day, and most of us started with used tools until we could do better. Always glad to help with specific suggestions and support.

Phil
Mastercarpenty is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-20-2017, 07:33 PM  
nealtw
Contractor retired
 
nealtw's Avatar
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Upper Fraser Valley, British Columbia
Posts: 22,583
Liked 2724 Times on 2395 Posts
Likes Given: 4450

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mastercarpenty View Post
Welcome to HouseRepairTalk and sobriety- I'm 13 years clean and I know you can do it too
Craigslist, yard sales, and looking for neighbors and new friends who might have tools for free or cheap wil get you a good start. To begin with on the cheap/free side, get what you can and take whatever you can get as long as it works. Better to have a crappy but working drill than no drill at all. If you can afford better, then spend that money on what you will use the most, beginning with a skilsaw and cordless drill. Also get a decent blade for the saw because the blade is doing the work moreso than the saw. Also get a speed-square which comes with a rafter-book; even if you never build a roof you'll learn about angles and the many other ways to use this tool plus it makes a great saw guide for square skilsaw cuts. My preferred blade is a Freud Diablo from the big orange store, very sharp with very clean cuts at a decent price

For the cordless drill I recommend nothing less than a brand-name 12V model; larger is better. The cheap no-name ones are junk with batteries that neither hold up while doing the work or last more than a few months. Right now lots of guys are upgrading and you might find good deals on older 18V tools- those will do anything you'll need them to and toy can still get new batteries for them. My preference is DeWalt and one of my 'secret sources' is MaxTool.com where factory refurbs, bare tools and 2 packs of 18V batteries go on sale often. All the major brands are there too.

You'll need drill bits and driver bits. As long as you avoid nails, the cheap paddle bits for wood work OK and can be sharpened with a file. For metalwork you need good bits; look for kits with brand names at the big-box stores when they're on sale. I like Milwaukee for screwdriver bits; not cheap but they last. Once again it's the bits that are going most of the work so good ones matter.

At this point, if your path is going toward finished items in-the-home you should consider a random-orbit sander. It will take much of the work out of sanding and refinishing projects. I don't know how I lived without one now. Here too a coping saw can make for nice curved cuts or a jigsaw can speed up that process. Don't scrimp on the jigsaw for doing fine work; the cheap ones wear out quickly and the cuts wont be true on the far side of the board. A good one is a lifetime investment if you treat it well and use it gently. Here too a miter saw can be wonderful to have. A 10" will do most of your work and used ones in good shape are fairly common and often cheap. Again stay with the better name brands.

A set of screwdrivers is usually cheaper than one of the good multi-bit jobs. An 8" adjustable wrench or larger is a good starting point. Vise-Grips are indispensable, and almost as useful are Channel-lock pliers. Nail-sets are a must; get Stanley if you can find them, the cheap ones are soft and die rapidly. Tape measures are kind of a personal preference but good prices can be found on the chrome Stanley ones since most folks now use their heavier-duty ones. Stanley also makes good chisels but unless you use them a lot a small set of cheaper ones will do OK- just keep them sharp and don't cut into any nails.

Yeah, that's a lot of stuff but you don't need all of it right now. Think about your upcoming projects ahead of time and get the tools as you need them. And keep some 'spending money' on hand to catch tools you want when they are on sale. Scrounge the 'clearance' shelves and don't buy on impulse alone- get only whay you know you will need and use.

In time you'll know which way to go on your own and you'll build up to having a nice shop with nice tools to build nice things with. None of us got where we are in a day, and most of us started with used tools until we could do better. Always glad to help with specific suggestions and support.

Phil
Phil., well done.
nealtw is online now  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-21-2017, 01:18 AM  
J0sh
Junior Member
Join Date: Mar 2017
Posts: 6
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mastercarpenty View Post
Welcome to HouseRepairTalk and sobriety- I'm 13 years clean and I know you can do it too
Craigslist, yard sales, and looking for neighbors and new friends who might have tools for free or cheap wil get you a good start. To begin with on the cheap/free side, get what you can and take whatever you can get as long as it works. Better to have a crappy but working drill than no drill at all. If you can afford better, then spend that money on what you will use the most, beginning with a skilsaw and cordless drill. Also get a decent blade for the saw because the blade is doing the work moreso than the saw. Also get a speed-square which comes with a rafter-book; even if you never build a roof you'll learn about angles and the many other ways to use this tool plus it makes a great saw guide for square skilsaw cuts. My preferred blade is a Freud Diablo from the big orange store, very sharp with very clean cuts at a decent price

For the cordless drill I recommend nothing less than a brand-name 12V model; larger is better. The cheap no-name ones are junk with batteries that neither hold up while doing the work or last more than a few months. Right now lots of guys are upgrading and you might find good deals on older 18V tools- those will do anything you'll need them to and toy can still get new batteries for them. My preference is DeWalt and one of my 'secret sources' is MaxTool.com where factory refurbs, bare tools and 2 packs of 18V batteries go on sale often. All the major brands are there too.

You'll need drill bits and driver bits. As long as you avoid nails, the cheap paddle bits for wood work OK and can be sharpened with a file. For metalwork you need good bits; look for kits with brand names at the big-box stores when they're on sale. I like Milwaukee for screwdriver bits; not cheap but they last. Once again it's the bits that are going most of the work so good ones matter.

At this point, if your path is going toward finished items in-the-home you should consider a random-orbit sander. It will take much of the work out of sanding and refinishing projects. I don't know how I lived without one now. Here too a coping saw can make for nice curved cuts or a jigsaw can speed up that process. Don't scrimp on the jigsaw for doing fine work; the cheap ones wear out quickly and the cuts wont be true on the far side of the board. A good one is a lifetime investment if you treat it well and use it gently. Here too a miter saw can be wonderful to have. A 10" will do most of your work and used ones in good shape are fairly common and often cheap. Again stay with the better name brands.

A set of screwdrivers is usually cheaper than one of the good multi-bit jobs. An 8" adjustable wrench or larger is a good starting point. Vise-Grips are indispensable, and almost as useful are Channel-lock pliers. Nail-sets are a must; get Stanley if you can find them, the cheap ones are soft and die rapidly. Tape measures are kind of a personal preference but good prices can be found on the chrome Stanley ones since most folks now use their heavier-duty ones. Stanley also makes good chisels but unless you use them a lot a small set of cheaper ones will do OK- just keep them sharp and don't cut into any nails.

Yeah, that's a lot of stuff but you don't need all of it right now. Think about your upcoming projects ahead of time and get the tools as you need them. And keep some 'spending money' on hand to catch tools you want when they are on sale. Scrounge the 'clearance' shelves and don't buy on impulse alone- get only whay you know you will need and use.

In time you'll know which way to go on your own and you'll build up to having a nice shop with nice tools to build nice things with. None of us got where we are in a day, and most of us started with used tools until we could do better. Always glad to help with specific suggestions and support.

Phil
Phil, you are the man!! I don't think anyone could have put it any better! and congratulations on the 13 years man .

I'm going to get onto some friends and family now to see what they have lying around to see if I can get some good deals. There is a nice list of tools for me to search for above that will keep me busy for a while.

I will be back when I know more

Thanks so much
J0sh is offline  
nealtw Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2017, 03:02 PM  
slownsteady
Administrator
HRT_ADMIN.png
 
slownsteady's Avatar
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Newton, NJ
Posts: 6,060
Liked 1059 Times on 873 Posts
Likes Given: 1725

Default

I generally get a cheaper version of a tool at first, to see how often I really use it and to better understand what it's capable of. Then if it works for me, I will eventually replace it with a quality tool.


__________________
Learn something every day
---
SnS
slownsteady is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Hello guys GloriJo Introductions 3 03-09-2017 05:19 AM
Advice on where to start laying wood floor vinny186 General Home Improvement Discussion 5 11-24-2016 11:00 AM
Hi Guys Need some help JeremyB Bricks, Masonry and Concrete 4 08-10-2011 10:17 PM
Looking for some STUCCO advice (About to start project) BimmerJon Bricks, Masonry and Concrete 1 05-14-2008 07:32 AM



Newest Threads