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Old 11-02-2014, 10:57 PM  
slownsteady
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You have a lot of stuff going on in this post. For me, it is almost impossible to track all the info. You can try breaking this down into bite-sized chunks for us (me).

Re the dryer vent: as a rule, the rigid smooth pipe is always the better choice. Keep in mind that you must have access to the pipe, because you will have to disconnect it to clean it periodically. So the skinny duct makes sense if the space is tight. The less turns, the better. I don't think the window duct is a portable solution. You would pick a window, and mount it with the intention of it being "permanent". I think you are right in your list of negatives for that. I hate poking holes of any size into the skin of my house, but I would make a hole for the dryer vent. You should not require any spare siding to do that.

Get yourself a sturdy landscaping rake and a hoe. I suspect you will have to redo all the plumbing under the house, so you might as well scrape out some extra space under there, or find a skinny plumber.


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Old 11-03-2014, 03:24 PM  
zannej
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Yeah, sorry my thoughts are not so organized. I do need to break it down better. I just need to figure out how. I'm a stream of consciousness person and its all in one big file in my brain.

The reason I would need more siding is to cover up the old hole if I make a new one. The exterior walls have some asbestos so I wanted to avoid cutting. The plumber is fat, but his brother-in-law who does most of the gruntwork is skinny.

Here's a question, how do I pull my dryer forward to get to the ductwork if the ductwork is attached? It will pull the ducting off, right? I'm worried it will bend.

If it turns out that the vent on my dryer is up high, then I might go with a short slim 90 and a window thing. I could probably even make my own window thing if I really wanted and have it be something thicker than the metal piece I saw and then attach the stuff that would normally go in a hole in the wall. I hope that is making sense. I could use some scrap wood maybe and seal it up well and maybe use some sort of insulation on it. Or maybe they sell other kinds-- I just haven't seen them.

Maybe I can break it down into an IF, THEN, ELSE statement

IF I keep the existing hole for the vent THEN I would have to run some sort of ductwork through the wall and hope it fits behind the tub
ELSE I would have to fill in that hole (replacing the siding) and find another solution.

IF I decide to move the location THEN I would have to make a new hole in the wall
ELSE I would use a window opening for the vent.

I hope that made sense. LOL.

I think I might have to just nix the idea of the semi-rigid and flexible options and just go with slim 90 degree ductwork.



Last edited by zannej; 11-03-2014 at 03:33 PM.
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Old 11-03-2014, 03:44 PM  
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Somehow that all made sence.
I don't like the window idea. please don't do that. For repairing the old hole, when you buy the new vent for outside by two, seal the door closed on one and install it as a dumby on the old hole, who will know?
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Old 11-03-2014, 06:46 PM  
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Ok. I guess I just need to abridge my thoughts more. LOL.

Ahhh! Thank you for the idea of just leaving some sort of cover on the outside but filling in the inside. That will save time and materials because the hole juts in to two pieces of siding.

I might see if they have a cover that can be closed up to limit airflow. I will have to remove or cut the metal duct piece that is sticking out.

My gut said the window thing is not the best idea so I will have to agree with you. That leaves either a hole straight back OR a slim 90 to the side. I could get a thin rigid 90.
I just need to determine whether the specs from electrolux are correct about the vent position.
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Old 11-03-2014, 07:30 PM  
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On most vent covers the pipe is easily removed so it can be used as a blank
On the inside have a look at this.
http://www.dryerbox.com/
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:36 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nealtw View Post
On most vent covers the pipe is easily removed so it can be used as a blank
On the inside have a look at this.
http://www.dryerbox.com/
Thanks. The dryer will have its back to an exterior wall, so I will have to find some way to insulate it. It would work well on an interior wall, but putting them against the exterior wall makes things less cramped. I just need to decide if I want them both crammed together tightly or if I want some space in between and whether or not to bump them over more to the left or to the right.

Are there any code issues with having the vent below the window (or near the window)? Its a window which will pretty much be used for light and probably won't be opened.
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Old 11-03-2014, 08:57 PM  
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I don't know if it is a code issue, I'm in a fairly new house and it is just above the window and about three feet from a door.
I don't think it makes much difference between running the vent straight in line with the dryer pipe or displacing insulation in the wall so you can put the vent elswhere. You just want to make sure you have a good flapper in the vent.
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Old 11-04-2014, 02:19 AM  
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For some reason I envisioned a 20s flapper girl... LOL.

Ok, so there is supposed to be a flapper to prevent stuff from getting back in and it opens when the air is blowing out?
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Old 11-11-2014, 04:04 AM  
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My latest sketch of the layout: (there was some detail pixellated by the compression when I uploaded)


A few things to note:
* The dryer duct would go straight back, but I didn't want to mess up the window in the drawing

* I would probably add a shelf that folds down along the south wall of the laundry room.

* The lavatory is offset from the side wall by 4" per code that I read somewhere (is that really necessary? Could I have it closer to the wall? Like flush against it or 2 inches away?) Does a Euro-style sink sitting atop a cabinet have to be 4" away from the side wall?

* The center of the toilet is a little over 15" away from the edge of the lavatory and over 16" away from the edge of the tub

* I'm not quite sure to where I should move the two electrical outlets from the existing laundry room. There are currently two of them. One of the lines seems to run through a PVC pipe under the house. The circuit box is on the northeast side, so moving it closer to there would probably be doable.

* I'm not sure about the placement of the outlet for the washer since its fairly close to the water supply, so I might have to move some things around to make sure that the plug is not likely to get hit with any water.

* Since the ceiling is just some sort of wooden boards (shiplack maybe?), I might take down the ceiling tiles and just paint the ceiling after using some filler in the cracks.

* I need to figure out if I should just move the current bathroom fan over to the new bathroom or add a new one and add more ducting. Either way, I'm going to have to move some ducting. I was thinking of swapping out the ceiling fan from existing laundry with the vent fan.

* I'm thinking of having a movable piece of furniture across from the toilet to store toilet paper-- or maybe some sort of laundry hamper.

* I plan to have a caddy of some sort above the toilet (high enough that it will not interfere with opening the tank for maintenance/repair)

* I will probably attach the toilet paper holder to the side of the vanity

* I need to figure out a plumbing configuration for the DWV for the toilet and sink. I saw a few options that I will post pictures of and note the changes that would be required. I am working on some rough sketches of some possible configurations. I will upload them later, but for now, any suggestions would be greatly appreciated (note, the main soil pipe runs from east to west -- the sketch is oriented with north at the top).

(this is the vanity)

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Old 11-11-2014, 10:36 AM  
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The 2 inches from the wall is for frost protection. If you brig the plumbing thru the cabinet from the floor you save the two inches.


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