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Old 03-06-2017, 06:43 PM  
BrandonBoss
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Thanks for the suggestions. What would be the best bet for raising the 2 walls that run parallel to the joists? I was thinking about putting in 9'' tall 4x6 posts on the stem wall every 12''to support that wall or blocking underneath that wall to support it when I do the subfloor. It is more then likely going to be rotten whatever is currently their. Their may not be a sill plate their either. I think that those 2 walls will be the hardest part of the job. The interior walls I can attempt to put another joist under or just block them. I just don't know how much room I will have between the last joists that runs next to the stem wall and the space where the sill/rim joist should be.


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Old 03-06-2017, 06:55 PM  
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Explain what you think a stem wall is.
It is not a term we use up here but I have heard a few different meanings.

Footing with wood wall below floor
footing and concrete wall below floor
footing concrete wall and wood would wall below floor.
Footing and piers below beams.

100 year old house most times the floor joist are just nailed and hung from the wall studs as they were balloon framed rather than platform framed as we see today.
So you might be looking at a mix of old and new systems.


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Old 03-06-2017, 08:56 PM  
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I was just referring to the concrete foundation. The gap between the top of the concrete and the bottom of the old subfloor is the area I was referring to when I said I wanted to block it or put in some kind of 4x6 that is the same height as the gap to support it.
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Old 03-06-2017, 09:28 PM  
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I was just referring to the concrete foundation. The gap between the top of the concrete and the bottom of the old subfloor is the area I was referring to when I said I wanted to block it or put in some kind of 4x6 that is the same height as the gap to support it.
Yes you can do that even with short pieces but then you have to figure how to join the new floor sheeting.
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Old 03-06-2017, 10:45 PM  
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If I am able to block it that should work to hold up the new sheeting between the wall and the nearest joist. I plan on cutting the subfloor flush with the wall so I can install the larger 1'' subfloor. I will try to make sure to have a block underneath the joints of the subfloor too. Any tips on jacking up the outer walls in case I have to?
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Old 03-07-2017, 03:37 PM  
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In an effort to make us all stop & think for a second, is it possible that correcting the issues with the joists will prevent the need to do major surgery on the subfloor?

Side question: Is a 2x10 with a 1.5 inch notch any stronger than a 2x8 when it comes to joists?
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Old 03-07-2017, 03:47 PM  
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In an effort to make us all stop & think for a second, is it possible that correcting the issues with the joists will prevent the need to do major surgery on the subfloor?

Side question: Is a 2x10 with a 1.5 inch notch any stronger than a 2x8 when it comes to joists?
I think it depends on who you talk to.
The notch gives the timber a place to break or start to crack, but sistered to the smaller joist will aid with the bend or sag.
So really the same advantage should be obtainable with the sister cut short of the bearing walls.
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:30 PM  
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The notch was to be level with the previous joists. 2x8's were a little to short so they used 2x10's and notched them enough to be level with where the house was before. It wasn't to provide extra strength.
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Old 03-07-2017, 04:33 PM  
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I don't want to do this major surgery but at the same time when I am done with this fix I don't want to mess with it again ever while living here. I plan on ripping up the carpet, hardwoods, and underlayment to expose the subfloor first and see if it is salvageable. If it looks decent I will probably go underneath the house with one of the guys I use for construction work and clamp the two joists together and use a palm nailer on them. I may use bolts on them as well. The other thing though is underneath areas like kitchen cabinets / bathtub how would I connect the subfloor to the newer joists? Would I just try to toe nail some nails through the new joist into the old subfloor from the bottom? Or use screws?
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Old 03-07-2017, 05:02 PM  
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When you install the new joist use a lot of floor glue between the joists and on the top edge of the new one.
Your first nails want to be sucker nails. Nailed near the bottom edge of the new joist on a 45*, once nailed all the way in, a few heavy swings with the hammer will suck the new joist up against the floor.
After that then nail 3 nails every 16"


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