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Old 02-16-2012, 02:59 PM  
ScottCh
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We got estimates from a few different companies before replacing most of our windows with low-E gas filled windows last year. One company I was originally considering told me that they ensure that there are no leaks by filling all of the gaps between the window and the framing with spray-in expanding foam.

This sounded like a good idea to me until I downloaded and read the installation instructions for the windows that we ordered. In big print at the top, it said not to use expanding foam. It places too much pressure on the window and can cause it to warp, jam, or even break over time. I discussed this with the other contractors and went with the one that already knew not to do this. They did use foam to seal the gaps, just not the expanding kind.


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Old 02-17-2012, 06:05 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottCh View Post
We got estimates from a few different companies before replacing most of our windows with low-E gas filled windows last year. One company I was originally considering told me that they ensure that there are no leaks by filling all of the gaps between the window and the framing with spray-in expanding foam.

This sounded like a good idea to me until I downloaded and read the installation instructions for the windows that we ordered. In big print at the top, it said not to use expanding foam. It places too much pressure on the window and can cause it to warp, jam, or even break over time. I discussed this with the other contractors and went with the one that already knew not to do this. They did use foam to seal the gaps, just not the expanding kind.
I would like to think most builders would know to use the low expansion door and window foam


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Old 06-06-2012, 09:20 AM  
EcoChoiceWindows
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Yes, Low E windows are your best bet..they will keep your home properly insulated and in turn save you about 30% in energy costs. In the summer, they'll help keep your home cool and in the winter help to keep the warm in. Like mentioned above, one of the main keys in finding a trusting window company to properly install the windows or else it is pretty well pointless.
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Old 06-06-2012, 12:45 PM  
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It is always best to fill the joint between the insulated wall and the window that always has low real insulation values.

Over 60% of the windows are installed improperly and the problems I see, it runs close to 90% since the windows are not as bad as the installation, which is usually "quick and dirty" on replacements. Usually no regard to the opportunity to correct earlier errors and compound them by poor flashing around the hole in the wall.

Tthe best window supplies use CERTIFIED window and door installers, but too often the good ones cost more.

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Old 06-06-2012, 06:56 PM  
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Dick, you mean you "GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR"? I see it all to often.

The excitement of low price is quickly replaced by the dissatisfaction of poor quality.
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Old 06-07-2012, 06:19 AM  
IntexInspector
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I have always preferred low e , casement style windows, I find casement provide the best seal. I also not to use replacement "inserts" , I prefer full flanged windows.But I do realize in some situations ,particularly in older homes, that inserts may be the only option.MTC
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Old 06-16-2012, 07:25 AM  
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I have always preferred low e , casement style windows, I find casement provide the best seal. I also not to use replacement "inserts" , I prefer full flanged windows.But I do realize in some situations ,particularly in older homes, that inserts may be the only option.MTC
I agree, when you do a pocket window and leave the old frame and trim, you are relying on the fact the old installation was well insulated, which is unlikely.


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