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Old 05-07-2007, 03:13 PM  
thetoolman14
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Default Glass Blocks?

So I am setting up a project to put a glass block wall in my bathroom. I haven't started yet but i have been searching the internet for helpful advice on my project. I have a little experience with remodeling but i am still new to the area. I saw a video on homremodeldeo.com that was helpful. But i would really appreciate advice from anyone with any experience in this area.
-Joe


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Old 10-17-2010, 07:11 PM  
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well, I can't help the OP out much, I am looking for the same, I am going to install a 3 x 3 window in the bathroom above shower height to let natural light in. Does anyone know if those plastic spacers that can be caulked in with silicone are worth a hoot?

And where I can pick them up....I am assuming most home improvement stores might have something along the line of that???

Other wise I have heard you need to have it planed out, and have strips for every layer to attach it to the walls adjacent. Beyond that it does not seem like it is rocket science.


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Old 10-17-2010, 08:06 PM  
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i built a million dollar house a few years ago and we had a six foot round diameter shower with glass blocks on the plans. after research, we opted for the acrylic (plastic) blocks. we laid them just like they were glass and they did fine. the only place we could find glass block was a brick supply house and they were getting out of the glass block business. i'm not sure whether they wanted out or suppliers were shifting toward cost issues. the plastic blocks were easy to work with and i haven't heard anything back on them. no news is good news! probably five or six years ago. thanks, budro
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Old 10-18-2010, 09:00 AM  
ISUzj
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also on a side note, is there a good way to polish older glass blocks, we have the blocks already and they are in some need of cleaning.

I was thinking 3m rubbing compound and a buffer.. would that work, kind Like wet sanding?
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Old 10-19-2010, 08:47 AM  
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ok, so I found the strips and caulk at Menards, Home depot used to carry them I was told but does not anymore.

All it takes is some plastic spacers, a couple of moisture resistant screws and a tube or two of silicone caulk.

I think that I may try to do a quick write-up so people on here can see how they are to be put in. I am pretty much going to be building a window and then picking it up and placing it in an fabbed opening.... that seems to be the most legit way to do what I want to accomplish.
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Old 10-19-2010, 10:54 AM  
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I like the look of glass block and even incorporated them to let light in on the counter of my kitchen, but just a bit of warning from realtors I have been speaking to recently. They advise glass block is already outdated, and could possibly give your house a dated look. Just something to chew on.......
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Old 10-19-2010, 11:11 AM  
ISUzj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havasu View Post
I like the look of glass block and even incorporated them to let light in on the counter of my kitchen, but just a bit of warning from realtors I have been speaking to recently. They advise glass block is already outdated, and could possibly give your house a dated look. Just something to chew on.......
One thing to note... your in Cali, I am in Iowa, trends don't change as quick out here. As well as ppl aren't buying houses left and right and "updating" and then selling..

Thanks for the thoughts though
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Old 10-19-2010, 02:09 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ISUzj View Post
also on a side note, is there a good way to polish older glass blocks, we have the blocks already and they are in some need of cleaning.

I was thinking 3m rubbing compound and a buffer.. would that work, kind Like wet sanding?
Hi ISUzj. I work for Home Depot in the Chicago area and have a couple of thoughts on cleaning up old glass blocks…
Rubbing compound is quite abrasive. Its purpose is to remove a layer of oxidized paint so that the underlying color becomes visible.

I would use a much finer grit polish instead, after first removing any dirt off them with soapy water and a scrub brush. I know a guy who uses low abrasion toothpaste to polish glass, but I think something like automotive glass polish should work well if the surface is weathered.

Hope this helps.
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Old 10-19-2010, 02:43 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HD_Newf View Post
Hi ISUzj. I work for Home Depot in the Chicago area and have a couple of thoughts on cleaning up old glass blocks…
Rubbing compound is quite abrasive. Its purpose is to remove a layer of oxidized paint so that the underlying color becomes visible.

I would use a much finer grit polish instead, after first removing any dirt off them with soapy water and a scrub brush. I know a guy who uses low abrasion toothpaste to polish glass, but I think something like automotive glass polish should work well if the surface is weathered.

Hope this helps.
toothpaste...huh? would you know what kind, I think i want to try this.. then use like a automotive buffer to polish it out?
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Old 10-19-2010, 03:34 PM  
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toothpaste...huh? would you know what kind, I think i want to try this.. then use like a automotive buffer to polish it out?
This was years ago, but I think he used Ultrabrite.

As I said though, I would go to an auto parts store and buy window glass polish. You can use it with a buffer to clear up the glass.


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