DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Walls and Ceilings > Removing wallpaper scraped up the drywall




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Old 01-02-2008, 10:36 PM  
cheesefood
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Default Removing wallpaper scraped up the drywall

I'm removing all the wallpaper in my bathroom. (It's ugly as foo.) In doing so, I've scraped up the drywall a bit. Not any deep gouges, but enough to expose the brown paper under the primed part of the drywall. When I'm finished removing the paper I plan to prime with an oil-based primer, but prior to that what should I do to smooth out the wall? Is this a job for Capt'n Spackle?



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Old 01-03-2008, 10:22 PM  
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Welcome Cheesefood:
Yes the brown paper will be fuzzy and will show through new paint. I would get a gallon of drywall compound and give it a skim coat to cover the fuzzies. Then, lightly sand or use a wet sponge to keep down the dust, prime with Kilz or equvilent and paint 2 coats with latex enamel.
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Old 01-04-2008, 11:16 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glennjanie View Post
Welcome Cheesefood:
Yes the brown paper will be fuzzy and will show through new paint. I would get a gallon of drywall compound and give it a skim coat to cover the fuzzies. Then, lightly sand or use a wet sponge to keep down the dust, prime with Kilz or equvilent and paint 2 coats with latex enamel.
Glenn
Thanks Glennjanie. Sounds like a plan. I was surveying the walls last night and I think that's exactly what I'll need to do due to the amount of hidden damage I found under the wallpaper.
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Old 01-05-2008, 09:06 PM  
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Default Stop!!!

Before u use an oil based primer stop. This stuff is awful for the environment and there is actually something better. Guardz by Zinzer is the best bonding primer in the world and it is water based!
If you dont want to have to do alot of sheet rock mudding to fix the wall you may want to try a product like Weathered Stone
http://www.weathered-stone.com

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Old 01-05-2008, 09:27 PM  
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I'm all for using water based whenever possible, but it will be problematic for this purpose. Anything water based is going to cause the exposed paper to blister and pull away. Oil based is needed for this.

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Old 01-05-2008, 09:40 PM  
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Put a coat of topping compound on one of the wall so far. It's going to need a lot of sanding to get some of the ridges down.

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Old 01-05-2008, 09:43 PM  
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Quote:
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Put a coat of topping compound on one of the wall so far. It's going to need a lot of sanding to get some of the ridges down.
Most of the ridges can be scraped smooth with a 6" taping knife. Will save at least some sanding.
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Old 01-09-2008, 03:10 PM  
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I had to fix some peeled wallboard for a customer. I skimmed it with latex spackle, then sanded it slightly. Two coats of paint, it looks fine.

I have gone completely away from oil-based paints and am thinking about doing the same for all finishes. In some areas it's illegal to use them anyway because of the volatiles. My take is that is that it's easier to clean up after water based paint, cheaper and safer (fire danger) since there are no cans of thinner, acetone, or alcohol hanging about. I still use oil-based polyurethane but with a disposable foam brush.

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Old 10-20-2009, 08:38 AM  
SeanH
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Default Guardz

Yes most water based products will cause blistering of the paper. Guardz is the only product that this does not happen. In fact when the guardz dries it will cause the paper to suck up to the wall and remain tight. We have used this many times and it works wonders.
Thanks!
Sean Howard ProductionsSean Howard Productions

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Old 10-21-2009, 01:24 AM  
ljsayat13
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Use CHOMP wallpaper remover. Buy the concentrated formula but when mixing it with water add extra CHOMP. Then follow the directions on the bottle for wallpaper removal. Drywall that is not water rated cannot stand up to dampness or anything. That's why we paint or add wallpaper it actully protects the drywall besides looking nice. Unfortunately, without steam or wallpaper remover, the paper will not come off easily. If you use a putty knife, this can leave nasty holes in the wall. Either way you're looking at replacing what the last owners did not do right at all.



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