DIY Home Improvement, Remodeling & Repair Forum > DIY Home Improvement > Walls and Ceilings > Load bearing wall (its not really a wall)




Help Support House Repair Talk by donating using the link above.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 03-28-2008, 05:01 PM  
icemaker
Junior Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Default Load bearing wall (its not really a wall)

Hey fellas- great forum- I'm glad I came across this in my googling... I'm a pretty active DIYer- I'm no expert by any means but do have some construction experience (working summers building houses in high school)- so I'm pretty handy with a hammer

Anyways- I've run into a snag in my kitchen remodel project- I've basically gutted the entire kitchen and am remodeling it from scratch. But I've got this one 3 foot wall smack dab in the middle that I want to take out so I can install a island and I am 95% certain its load bearing. I've called up a struc. engineer to check it out and lay out my options (replace wall with a I-beam, etc), but would like to get y'alls input that I can throw at this guy when he comes to look.

My house is 2 story with a concrete base, the kitchen measures about 22 ft long, and the area above the kitchen is a loft where I have my home office, no other wall above this 3 ft wall. The beam is 2 2x11 nailed together, but its split right above the 3 foot wall, see the pics below and let me know what y'all think.

My name is John, btw- I hail from sunny Arizona (Tempe).

-Cheers


Click image for larger version

Name:	load1.gif
Views:	673
Size:	132.5 KB
ID:	620   Click image for larger version

Name:	load2.gif
Views:	752
Size:	135.7 KB
ID:	621   Click image for larger version

Name:	load3.gif
Views:	627
Size:	137.7 KB
ID:	622   Click image for larger version

Name:	load4.gif
Views:	1350
Size:	151.4 KB
ID:	623  
icemaker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 05:14 PM  
Square Eye
Senior Member
 
Square Eye's Avatar
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,273
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Yeah.

The best you're going to be able to do is set a post at the splice in place of the wall.
That wall IS load bearing and no beam I know of can span that distance without creating some serious headroom issues. Looks like you're already down to the top of the door frames
Listen to the engineer and don't skimp on anything he recommends.

And welcome
Great first post!


Square Eye is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 06:13 PM  
icemaker
Junior Member
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2
Default

Thanks mate... thats pretty much in line with what I've been thinking- I'm going to ask the guy if its possible to attach a 23 foot 2x11 beam to the existing beam (on the side with the openings)- it would take some extra work- but if its feasible with bldg codes and whatnot, then I'd do it.....

but I'm not sure if they make 23ft 2x11 boards..

I guess you can probably tell me if its a pipe dream

-Cheers
John
icemaker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2008, 08:10 PM  
Square Eye
Senior Member
 
Square Eye's Avatar
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,273
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts

Default

It would have to be an engineered laminated beam. Even at that, I don't see it happening.



But

I'm no engineer
Square Eye is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter DIY Home Repair Forum Replies Last Post
Load Bearing Wall question cruickshanks Framing and Foundation 6 12-18-2008 09:10 AM
Load Bearing Wall Question jkspup22 Framing and Foundation 2 07-12-2008 08:30 AM
Opening wall, don't think it's load bearing? CZSteve Walls and Ceilings 8 01-15-2008 01:45 AM
Load bearing wall bfash General Home Improvement Discussion 9 11-28-2007 09:01 AM
load bearing wall from 1920 Will Carpentry and Woodworking 7 07-18-2006 09:35 AM



Newest Threads