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Old 05-29-2006, 09:07 PM  
ChuckDiamond
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Default Sheetrock 101

I have a lot of wood paneling.

I have to either put sheetrock over it or take it down and replace the sheetrock. Either way, sheetrock is in my future.

I have never dealt with it before so a breakdown on the how-tos or a link to a website with a tutorial would be a great source of information to have.

Thanks!



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Old 05-29-2006, 10:06 PM  
Square Eye
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Pull it down. You'll be glad you did.

I did this in my own home. I pulled the paneling down and there was drywall behind it. In one room, I pulled the drywall down and started over. It went well and looks great. In the other room, I tried to refinish the existing drywall. It's been trouble.

In my house and in most of the remodels I have done, I put the wall boards up vertical 8' high and 4' wide, this makes it much easier to get a good baseboard fit later. Most of them had to be cut for length. I rested the wall boards on 1/2" plywood or drywall scraps to keep it off of the floor. This keeps the drywall from getting wet from spills on the floor. Fasten the wall board to the studs with 1 5/8" screws, I put them 8" apart on the edge and no more than 1ft apart in the field. Often, I put 2 screws 2" apart every foot up the studs. This makes it very strong. Use a dimpler attachment on your drill to set the depth of the screws. Put the screws in as straight and square to the surface as possible. This makes them stronger and easier to finish.

After you get all of the drywall up, then you install the outside corner metal, if you have any outside corners. Then you can tape the joints. I use mesh tape in the tapered joints, paper tape on the flat joints. There's no need to tape all of the screws. After you get the taping done, Start spreading the joint compound. The general purpose compound will work fine. Use a 6" taping knife to start. Put it on thick, not too thick, but don't scrape it all off until the tape is visible through the compound. I only do one side of all of my inside corners now. After it dries, I scrape the ridges off with the 6" knife and cover the other side of my inside corners. Then I pick up my wider 10" taping knife or trowel and spread a good coat of compound over the joints and screw heads.

When that dries, I knock down ridges again with the 6" knife and start sanding the rough spots. After some spot sanding, I get out the 12" trowel. I do the corners first and get them feathered out as even as I can. Then I run the joints again and hit the rough spots where it had bubbles or lumps in the previous coat.

Sanding sanding sanding, then cleaning, then primer. The primer will show all of your flaws very well. Touch them up with compound, sand again and touch up the primer.

Ta-da! Make somebody else paint it and trim it and you're done. OR, do what I do and don't let anybody help,, never get done.



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Old 05-31-2006, 11:42 AM  
TxBuilder
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What substance do you use to texture the sheet rock?

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Old 05-31-2006, 12:58 PM  
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For ceilings, I thin general purpose just enough to get it loose enough to apply with a paint roller. It's too thick straight out of the bucket.

There is also a texture available for ceilings. It looks like it has sand in it. The ceiling dries out to more of a grainy texture. There are other types of texture compound out there, but I only use what my customers have requested.

I haven't textured any walls. Around here though, the popular wall texture is called "knock down", it's applied with a special texture roller, then as it's just about to set, they trowel it down just enough to flatten the tops of the texture even. I like it, but it's hard to paint because it tends to hold paint in the texture and then run when you turn your back. The guys who do this texture on the walls use a bag mix, powder form. I suppose general purpose would work.

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Old 06-02-2006, 04:33 PM  
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Hi Chuck:
I might add one more fine pont for you. Most beginning drywallers have a tremendous problem with dust from heavy sanding. I have seen Square Eye use a spray bottle of water on those nuisance little ridges and scrape them with his 6" knife. It eliminates the dust.
Glenn

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Old 06-02-2006, 09:09 PM  
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YUCK
I am sorry but IMHO knockdown is ugly, no wait it's not IMHO it's a proven fact. Anyway texture will cover up a fair amount of sins in your mudding. Most texturing these days is done with a spray rig. either a small hopper that hooks to an air comp. or a unit built to spray texture. By changing the flow,pressure and orifice size, as well as the thickness of the gunk, different textures can be achived. from a light splatter to orange peel, to heavy splatter and if you must knockdown. don't even get me started on that horrible "popcorn"
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Old 06-02-2006, 09:21 PM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asbestos
YUCK
don't even get me started on that horrible "popcorn"
YEAH BABY!!

With gold glitter!!

Woooooooo-hoo!!
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Old 06-04-2006, 09:26 AM  
Dale
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Default With gold glitter

Hello sqare eye
Wo! dont tell me they make texture with gold glitter, whatever next
Regards
Dale

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Old 06-14-2006, 02:52 PM  
hubbie
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Square eye, you seem to be the most knowlegeable and forgive me I'm a girl with a home improvement hobby. I have paneling and someone recently brought to my attention that the rest of the sheetrock in my house is an older version maybe 1/8" and now they make 1/4". Apparently I can run into a lot of trouble around outlets and windows with trim etc. Making the job more of a cancer and a much larger expense than originally expected. What is your experience with the sheetrock old vs. new? What size would I need to replace paneling with nothing behind it at all?

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Old 06-14-2006, 10:55 PM  
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Thin old sheetrock is a pain to mess with. Flimsy, cracks easily, shows flaws in the framing.

1/2" is pretty much the standard now for interior walls.

Cut the openings carefully and you should be alright with the electrical devices. The windows are another story. You will have to fill the space added by using the thicker wall board. Still, I'd go for the 1/2".





"Square eye, you seem to be the most knowlegeable,"

P-HA-HA-HA-HA-HA-Ha-ha-ha-ha-ho-hum...

Maybe the most likely to reply,,,, most knowlegeable?


NAW! Biggest mouth more like it.



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