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Old 06-02-2006, 06:22 PM  
bubba
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Default Fence repair

I have an 8 foot privacy fence and due to the extremely dry winter, the ground has contracted. My fence has begun to sway and I am concerned that the posts are not stable. I can lightly shove on it and the posts literally move a good 2-3 inches. The posts are steel and the fence is cedar. The posts are set in cement, but i would like to add more to them to stablize the fence. I have already done two of them by digging out around the post about 2 feet down and sloshing a bag of Quickcrete around them, then covering the holes back with dirt. It is hard work, but it seems to work. Am I doing the right thing or does someone else have a suggestion for me? Thanks for any advice.



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Old 06-02-2006, 08:53 PM  
inspectorD
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Default Ok

Dont mess with something if it works right...
It's ok what you are doing, sounds like it steadies those loose posts just fine.
If it was easy ,it wouldn't be worth doin.......



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Old 06-13-2006, 11:12 AM  
erockybalboa
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Default Fences

You just built the perfect fence. To keep that "new" look you'll want to have maintenance done on a regular basis. You may not have known that you need to upkeep your fence before you built it, but in order to make it last you will have to. Our fence expert, Richard Novigrod, who has ten years experience building fences, says without some care your fence won't last as long as it should.

"Trim the back of the trees and shrubs. It helps the fence dry out after a rain. It tends to dry out faster and not decompose as quickly," Novigrod says.

According to the website, Mrsfixit.com, for privacy fences you should annually inspect the boards on the fence. Look for those that are either loose or rotted. If any are loose, fix with nails immediately. Dig around your fence posts to check for possible rotting underneath, as well. Some tools you will need to do the job are nails, trowel, wood sealer, hammer, and a brush.

You will want to protect your wooden privacy fence from Mother Nature by applying a water repellent sealer. Use a brush to cover the entire fence. Make sure you get between the boards. You should seal your fence every few years. Find out the recommended times for your fence from a professional company. This sealant is important because it will keep your fence in tip top shape.

If you have a vinyl fence, the website, Yourfencestore.com, says washing down your fence on a regular basis will keep it looking new and fresh.

You will want to use a large brush and a garden hose to clean your fence. With a garden hose spray the fence and scrub off any dirt or residue. If you have stains that won't nudge you can use this concoction: 1/3 cup powered detergent, 2/3 cup household cleaner, and one gallon of water. Apply to problem areas and scrub.

For chain link fences, you will want to make sure and buy a type of metal that is treated so it won't rust. Make sure you trim bushes and trees around your chain link. Overall, chain link fences are basically maintenance-free.

When unexpected problems show up on your fence, a good idea is to call a professional fence contractor. Novigrod says you can have them inspect it or ask them for some advice so you can fix it. Another tip is to follow the manufacture's guidelines. In most cases you will find wood fences require the most maintenance. Vinyl and chain link require very little maintenance.

Another option is buy a book on "How to build a fence." This will enable you to follow diagrams as you work to maintain your fence. Another idea is to do some research on the internet. Many fencing experts divulge their secrets and guidelines on what best works for them.

When in doubt, never be ashamed to ask for help. Doing so will enable you to avoid making big mistakes later. Those mistakes can cost you big money in the end.
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Old 12-10-2006, 05:21 PM  
luvr29
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Default Fence Repair

The first step in repairing a fence is to remove the fencing or rails if they will get in the way of the repair. You can remove the fencing with a pry bar, or cut out the damaged section with a handsaw. When repairing a post, remove the fencing and rails connected to the post. Once the repair is completed, replace fencing and rails with new nails driven into new nail holes.

Scrub wooden fences with a fiber brush and a mild detergent solution to remove most stains. For tougher stains, add 1 to 2 cups of bleach to a bucket of warm water. Wear gloves and safety goggles aways when working with strong cleansers.

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Old 12-21-2006, 01:18 PM  
luvr29
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Default Fence repair

The first step in repairing a fence is to remove the fencing or rails if they will get in the way of the repair. You can remove the fencing with a pry bar, or cut out the damaged section with a handsaw. When repairing a post, remove the fencing and rails connected to the post. Once the repair is completed, replace fencing and rails with new nails driven into new nail holes.

Scrub wooden fences with a fiber brush and a mild detergent solution to remove most stains. For tougher stains, add 1 to 2 cups of bleach to a bucket of warm water. Wear gloves and safety goggles aways when working with strong cleansers.

Clean vinyl fences with a sodium-bicarbonate-base cleaner. Bleach may stain the fence while cleaning. Also, use a cloth instead of a brush so you don't scratch the surfaces of the fence.

Clean metal fences with a wire brush by scrubbing away old paint, dirt, and rust from metal posts. Most stains can be taken care of with a cup of strong household dtergent in a gallon of warm water.

Reinforce rail ends by fastening 2x4 cleats under the rail to the posts. Secure the cleats with galvanized 10d nails (3-inch) nails. You also can reinforce a third rail using this method. Add a sister rail to bolster a damaged rail. It can span the entire rail or just part of it, depending on the damage. Clamp the sister rail under or on top of the original, then drill holes through both rails and secure them with 3/8 x 4-inch carriage bolts. Remove the clamps.

Straightening wood posts requires digging around the post until you reach the bottom of it. Put aside the soil you remove for backfilling around the post. If the post is set in concrete, use a sledgehammer and break up the concrete. Remove the pieces and straighten the post. Add new concrete.

Your new fence will look like you have worked hard on it for years.

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Old 05-11-2011, 07:24 PM  
znn94x
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I used this product <a title="PostProblemSolver.com" href="http://postproblemsolver.com">PostProblemSolver.com</a> to pull out 6 fence post stumps encased in concrete in less than an hour. Best solution I’ve found.

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Old 05-19-2011, 10:09 PM  
OYLBuilders
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It sounds like you might be experiencing the affects of frost heave. Also, if you have expansive soils it will make that issue worse.

You can certainly use the method you described, but the fix might be short-lived. A more permanent option would be to remove the existing posts and concrete, then replace with a method as described in this page:

Setting Fence Posts to Resist Frost Heave



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