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Old 02-07-2010, 10:04 PM  
ilyaz
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Default Any advice on picking a kitchen faucet?

We need to pick a faucet for the kitchen we're about to start remodeling. I read some general advice on how to pick one but I need a few more specific recommendations in terms of reliability and usability.

We're converging toward a single-handle faucet. The one we have now has a side spray pull-out but we're considering getting a faucet with a built-in pull-out. How do these generally compare to side pull-outs? Do they last as long? Are there certain types/brands of built-in pull-outs that are better?

By the way, in case it's relevant, we will have a D-shaped undermount sink and will have a choice of either one or two holes in the corners of the "D".

Are there certain types of handles that are better than others. It seems that the longer one is the better since it's easier to move it especially if your hands are occupied or dirty. Is this the case?

Finally, we're not sure whether we want a straight faucet or one of those longer gooseneck-type ones. Any advice on picking one over the other?

Thanks!



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Old 02-08-2010, 08:05 AM  
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Ah faucets...
This is easy!

The adage you get what you pay for comes into play...
There are a lot of cheap faucets in the $40-80 range that look great but get ugly quick. Simply put they are disposable...

Above that in the $80-120 range you can find some decent but simple versions of some good old work horses like Delta and Moen...

Up higher you find the fancier versions of Delta, Moen, Kohler etc...

Pull out types tend to be more problematic with stress on the hose being a problem...

I like Delta and Moen myself, Kohler tends to be a PITA when it comes to parts.

I advise people to avoid high end designer stuff they can be a real PITA for parts and often have ceased to exist when you need a part...
$300 worth of parts to repair a $800 kitchen sink faucet is just dumb IMHO

Goose neck faucets tend to appear to be dripping long after you shut them off because of water retained in the gooseneck...

Just my



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Old 02-08-2010, 09:36 AM  
ilyaz
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Redwood,

Thanks for the info. A couple of follow-up q's.
1. Our sink is 9" deep (U-235 here: Alpha International :: Under Mount Sinks). Is there any sort of rule of thumb for picking the right faucet size relative to the size of the sink? I guess how much water a faucet can push through itself also comes into play. Any recommendations there?

2. Here's one we're looking at: MOEN Solidad Single Handle Pull-Down Kitchen Faucet in Classic Stainless Steel - 87559CSL at The Home Depot
Do we need to worry about the deck plate is we're installing it into a corner of the "D"?

3. What's your experience with the Blanco brand?

Thanks!

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Old 02-08-2010, 10:58 AM  
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Originally Posted by ilyaz View Post
I guess how much water a faucet can push through itself also comes into play. Any recommendations there?
Every kitchen faucet will have an aerator that screws on to the end of the faucet spout. Inside that aerator will be a flow restrictor to reduce water flow through the faucet.

They put those flow restrictors in to save water. The whole idea is to reduce the flow so people who leave the water running when they wash their hands, brush their teeth or shave will use less water. That makes sense in a bathroom sink, but people use kitchen sinks differently. You don't shave or brush your teeth in front of your kitchen sink. So, if you prefer a faucet with greater flow, just take the flow restrictor out of the aerator. You may have more splashing in the sink because of the higher water flow rate, and the water might come out a bit cockeyed, but you can fill the sink a lot faster. Maybe just try it and see if you like it better that way.

And, no doubt someone's gonna bark at me for this advice too, cuz modifying the faucet in any way at all gives the manufacturer an excuse to void the warranty. (so just don't tell anyone you took the flow restrictor out of the aerator)
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Old 02-08-2010, 01:58 PM  
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I'm no plumber, but I can tell you that most of these new faucets aren't so easily modified to make them flow better. You can actually destroy one (as my Wife can attest) by trying to increase the flow.

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Old 02-08-2010, 04:30 PM  
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People should also be aware that Moen uses the same 1225 cartridge in all it's single lever faucets, from the $60 models to the $360 models. So it's not like you're getting a more reliable or trouble free faucet if you spend more. You just get more features (like a sprayer), maybe a different finish and the styling.

I expect it's exactly the same with Delta. They probably use that same stainless steel ball system in all of their single lever faucets too.

Speedbump: I expect you're thinking of a Tub & Shower faucet. These have anti-scald systems on them that automatically restrict the flow through the hot or cold water supply pipes if there's a pressure drop in the other supply pipe. That helps maintain a uniform shower temperature and prevents people from getting scalded in the shower if someone flushes a toilet, say. You can screw up the settings of the adjusting screws of a T&S faucet, but you shouldn't ruin the faucet by monkeying with the adjusting screws. And, kitchen deck faucets don't have that anti-scald system on them anyhow.

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Old 02-08-2010, 05:32 PM  
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For a kitchen sink, get a high, curved spout to get large items under it.

Dick

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Old 02-08-2010, 06:50 PM  
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Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
People should also be aware that Moen uses the same 1225 cartridge in all it's single lever faucets, from the $60 models to the $360 models. So it's not like you're getting a more reliable or trouble free faucet if you spend more. You just get more features (like a sprayer), maybe a different finish and the styling.

I expect it's exactly the same with Delta. They probably use that same stainless steel ball system in all of their single lever faucets too.
Nestor, is it really the case that all models of the same brand have the same reliability regardless of price? Honestly speaking, I find it kind of hard to believe.

So is Delat's single-lever mechanism significantly different from Moen's? If so, which one is better in your opinion?
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Old 02-08-2010, 08:18 PM  
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Ilyaz:
Moen uses the same 1225 cartridge (pictured below) in every single lever faucet they make. That's not just kitchen faucets, they also use it in all of their single lever bathroom sink and Tub&Shower faucets, and have for many years.



The one you get with the faucet will be brass, but any replacements they send you will be plastic like the one above.

It's what turns on, shuts off and regulates the flow of both hot and cold water. So, since this part is the same on all Moen single lever cartridges, then it's not reasonable to say that the 1225 cartridges used in the expenive faucets work any better or more reliably than the 1225 cartridges used in the cheaper faucets. They're all made the same.

But, there are other things that can wear out on a Moen single lever faucet beside that cartridge. If your spout swings from left to right as most kitchen faucet spouts do, there's undoubtedly an O-ring in there and probably two. It's possible that Moen uses two O-rings in their more expensive faucets in places where they only use one in their less expensive faucets. I don't know if that's the case or not as I've never taken the time to find out since I don't buy $300 kitchen faucets for my apartments. I just know that the cartridge that controls the water flow is the same.

It'd be a simple matter to find out, tho. The literature inside the box on Moen faucets will have an exploded view of the faucet in it. Just ask the guy at Home Depot to photocopy those drawing for you, and compare them to see if the more expensive faucet is built any differently than the less expensive one.

Don't get me wrong. I like the Moen 1225 cartridge, and many people do. It provides many years of trouble free service.

Delta uses a stainless steel ball and spring loaded rubber seats in it's single lever faucets. It's a completely different system (and is seen below):



In Delta single lever faucets, moving the handle causes a hollow stainless steel ball to rotate in different directions. The water comes through spring mounted rubber seats that press against the ball. There are holes on the ball, and as the ball turns, a larger or smaller area of hole is expose to the seat, and so more or less water flows through that seat.

Asking which is better, Moen or Delta is just like asking whether Chevy, Dodge or Fords are best. There are people who prefer one over the other, but if you ask me, both provide good service. I have no Delta faucets in my building, but my sister has a Delta single lever kitchen faucet and she's happy with it. I have a Moen single lever T&S faucet in my bathroom, and I'm happy with it.

If the world were perfect and only clean water flowed through your faucet, you would seldom ever have a dripping faucet. But, what I've noticed is that whenever I see a City of Winnipeg Truck doing any work in my neighborhood, I often get a spat of dripping faucets in suites after that. The correlation is simply too strong to ignore. I believe that every faucet would provide much more trouble free service, but a big cause of problems is stuff like sand or other foreign material that gets into the water supply pipes when they're being serviced. And, no company has produced a faucet yet that will tolerate stuff like sand or metal filings in the water.

I expect Delta uses that same stainless steel ball system in all of their single lever faucets, but I don't know that for sure.

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Old 02-09-2010, 01:02 AM  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nestor_Kelebay View Post
Ilyaz:
Moen uses the same 1225 cartridge (pictured below) in every single lever faucet they make. That's not just kitchen faucets, they also use it in all of their single lever bathroom sink and Tub&Shower faucets, and have for many years.



Nestor,
I'd like to introduce you to the Moen #1222 Posi-Temp Cartridge used on tub and shower valves



There is also an Exact-Temp thermostatic cartridge that is out these days....


Now for the faucet Info....

Pick one that you like that reaches far enough over the sink.
Corner mounting does place limitations on reach...

With the pullout style the limiting factor is usually the hose and its added friction loses...

In the corner mount situation you would single hole mount that facet without a deck plate.

Blanco...
Nice but overpriced...


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