8x12 shed floor and foundation

Discussion in 'Framing and Foundation' started by RedBaron, May 16, 2017.

Help Support House Repair Talk by donating using the link above.
  1. May 16, 2017 #1

    RedBaron

    RedBaron

    RedBaron

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    1
    Just wondering if this will work as a floor and foundation for a shed.
    Want to keep it as low as possible on long side so want to use joists to carry the load and the end/rim joists to hold the remaining joists

    top hill is to the right and would use wasted space off end of retaining wall so its flat along the 12 ft length where you would step out of the shed (bottom of sketch where dimensions are)

    ShedFloor.jpg
     
  2. May 16, 2017 #2

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,985
    Likes Received:
    3,149
    Normally almost anything goes for a shed but as you are of the ground some distance you do want to take it more seriously.
    As drawn I think you would want to double the 8 ft rim at each end and use hanger for all.

    Two thought.
    1 Move the piers out to the rim and double the rim.

    2 Attach rim to the retaining wall and move the lower piers out to the lower 12 ft double rim joist or put a 2 ply beam on piers where they are.
    That does away with 2 piers and runs the joists from the wall out.

    2 is what I would try to do.

    And welcome back, it's been a while.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2017
  3. May 16, 2017 #3

    RedBaron

    RedBaron

    RedBaron

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    1
    Only problem is I already poured the piers.
    Nice day on Sunday and figured had to get some work done, like you said its a shed, anything goes, so skipped the planning part. probably not the best move on my part
     
  4. May 16, 2017 #4

    nealtw

    nealtw

    nealtw

    Contractor retired

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2010
    Messages:
    23,985
    Likes Received:
    3,149
    So back to your plan, double over piers and double at both ends with hangers tying everything together.
    cut you joist to 11' 6" and if you are using TG plywood for the floor you may want to go a little shorter as some T and G flooring is not 4 ft wide.
     
  5. May 16, 2017 #5

    bud16415

    bud16415

    bud16415

    Fixer Upper Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Messages:
    4,718
    Likes Received:
    1,626
    All the weight of your building and contents will be concentrated on 4 points where the rim connects to the double beam joists. I understand you want to keep things lower so a stacked design where the joists sit on top of the beams is not practical. Where you show, the double joists are not the member that is taking most of the load. What is holding the building and contents is the right and left rim joists.

    As much as we don’t like to go backwards in a project I would pour new piers and make the right and left rim the load beam as a double and then hang all the joists off those 2 beams.

    Or better yet make the top and bottom rims the beams and then have shorter joists going in the other direction. Unless you already jumped the gun and bought the 12 footers.
     

Share This Page