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Anti-mildew paint or regular paint for kitchen?

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cshahar

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Hi Everyone:

I am a first-time home-owner! I was just wondering whether I should use an anti-mildew or regular paint for the kitchen? I am hearing mixed opinions about it when referencing the subject on the web. Apparently newer paints are almost as good in resisting mildew, and it is therefore not necessary to buy special paint for the kitchen. Is that true? On the other hand, it may be preferable to get special paint for the bathroom, which I wont paint for another couple of months...

Thanks,

-Charles
 

Snoonyb

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The key to "environmentally friendly" is free air space.
 

nealtw

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It is less important if you use the hood fan when cooking and the bath fan when you bath or shower.
 

DFBonnett

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Unless there was a known issue, I never used mildew resistant paint in baths or kitchens. Never had any complaints or call backs for mildew.
 

Daryl in Nanoose

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I have never worried about it in Kitchens just make sure its at least eggshell for easier cleanup. Bathrooms however really should be mildew resistant. I have been in sooooooo many baths with water run lines all over the walls because lack of putting the fan on, at least this way your covered
 

Smythers00

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My 2 cents:

The key thing in controlling mildew is controlling moisture. So you have to take into account humidity in that room as well as regular use (steam from cooking/cleaning, etc.).
If you have good ventilation/air flow in your kitchen, then mildew shouldn't be a problem with regular, off-the-shelf products.

Yes, mold/mildew resistant surfaces (paint, caulking, etc.) will help out, get them if you really want to. But if you're not looking after the moisture/humidity levels in that particular room, there's only so much those products can do for you. Mildew is a lot like my brother-in-law... keeps coming back (and requires more money).

What you need to do (again, my opinion) is get your humidifier/dehumidifier in your furnace serviced regularly. Improve the ventilation in your kitchen - get a fan in there that is appropriate for the dimensions of the area of use. Understand where the moisture will build up, and how vapour in the air of that room will flow and work with that. There are automatic fan switches that will turn on/off given a certain level of humidity.

Things like that.


Hope that helped.
 
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