Any advice on how to repair this?

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by dhilbe, Oct 15, 2011.

  1. Oct 15, 2011 #1

    dhilbe

    dhilbe

    dhilbe

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    I noticed the other day when we had a big rain, run-off from the roof was going over the gutter. This weekend I took a look at that section of the gutter and noticed the shingles are kind of bending upward - almost like a ramp for the water to fly over the gutter. I also noticed the flashing was lifting up at this spot - appearantly pushing the shingles upward. I slightly lifted the singles and noticed that where the flashing comes up, there are no nails/screws holding the flashing down. If I could get the shingles lifted up high enough, it looks like I could simply screw down the flashing. Yet, the singles don't lift very high - so I don't think I can get a screw driver in there without removing the singles - which I have not done before. Can anyone offer a suggestion how to fix this - easily? Two pictures at In Box Photo Gallery by Dave Hilbe at pbase.com. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Oct 15, 2011 #2

    isola96

    isola96

    isola96

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    So your shingles have screws in them?...
    I looked at the pics looks like the wind pushed up under the flashing causing your shingles to rise but why scews in them this was worked on before by some one else?
    My suggestion is see if there are same shingles at home depot or very similar
    You will have to retighten up the flashing to the roof make shore to use roofing nails on both flash and shingles.
     
  3. Oct 16, 2011 #3

    BridgeMan

    BridgeMan

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    A rather simple repair. Just wait for a warm day (so the shingles are flexible), and break the seal of the first 2 courses of shingles adjacent to the misbehaving drip-edge flashing, using a flat pry bar. Carefully lift up the second course shingles with the pry bar, such that the first course shingles' nail heads are exposed. Use a cat's paw to remove as many nails as necessary to enable the first course (and starter course, if there is one) to be lifted and bent back, exposing the flashing. If the underlayment covers the flashing, I'd just install panhead flashing screws right through it, sealing the heads and all broken seal-down tabs with some good roofer's cement.

    Don't try this on a cold day, or you'll more than likely tear and break shingles. And that could still happen on a warm day, if you're not careful. Then it's a matter of just replacing the broken shingles, by going through the above routine enough courses up to completely remove the damaged unit(s). If the roof is old enough to have faded, you may have trouble finding replacement shingles that are a perfect color match.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2011
  4. Oct 16, 2011 #4

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

    inspectorD

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    I agree, and I will use a 4 inch thick putty knife to get under those stuborn shingles, just be careful not to poke through.

    And wait for a warm sunny day, cold shingles are like cookies...they crumble.;)
     
  5. Oct 17, 2011 #5

    dhilbe

    dhilbe

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    Thanks for all the advice. I think I now know why the flashing is somewhat raised in this section. We recently had our house painted. The painter layed his ladder against this exact section of gutter. I think the pressure on the gutter pushed up the flashing. I'll take a crack at repaining this next weekend. Thanks for all the good advice.
     

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