Any personal experience w/these shingles?

Discussion in 'Roofing and Siding' started by BenzMama, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. Jan 20, 2010 #1

    BenzMama

    BenzMama

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    We're in the research stage of a new roof. A type which we are leaning heavily toward is composite ~ stone-covered metal. Decra is 1 brand of these. Tho they offer styles in tile, slate & shingle, we're looking more at the shingle style. The conservative estimate is a 50+ years life for them.

    Anybody have personal experience with these? Pros & cons info is appreciated!
     
  2. Jan 20, 2010 #2

    oldognewtrick

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    As a roofing contractor we have looked at this product and bid it on several projects. It appears to be a well constructed material. You can put a piece on the ground in the sumer time, let it warm up, scuff it with your foot and very little if any granule loss occurs. I don't care for a few of their flashing details, but all in all it seems to be a very good option for roofing installations.

    The biggest reaction we have encountered is price rejection. We do not believe in applying this material over existing roofing materials. Continued deterioration of the hidden materials will occur and you run the possibility of compromising the seams of the materials where they are locked together. You are getting a metal roof with the look of a dimensional asphalt shingle. The product is recyclable and has a fire rating.
     
  3. Jan 20, 2010 #3
    How does look in your opinion old dog?
     
  4. Jan 20, 2010 #4

    oldognewtrick

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    I like them enough that if I was going to re roof my house right now I'd probably put them on. Great product but you have to use all their flashings and details. If you like the look of a dimensional shingle you'll love the metal shingles. Hail resistant and pretty tuff. If you consider putting these on get a certified installer, don't let this be their first install of this product..

    "Well golly gee, this and one more will make two" wont cut it with these. The local rep for Decra will come out and help your installer if he has any questions or need advise.
     
  5. Jan 21, 2010 #5

    BenzMama

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    Can't get a better recommendation than from a roofing contractor! Unfortunately, there don't seem to be any certified installers in the Charlotte NC area so we'll have to bring one in for the job. Another company (KBS Metal Roofing) did say they could send out a pro to train/certify a roofing contractor we might select. Oldog, would you recommend having this roof install be done as an on the job training site?
     
  6. Jan 21, 2010 #6

    oldognewtrick

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    Wow, heres my 2 cents. This is a sizable investment in your house, you should choose a contractor who is more interested in giving you the best installation possible and NOT the getting the job with the cheapest price. If installed properly, with ALL the required accessories, this system is going to last for a long, long time. Having a contractor certified on your job? Shouldn't be a problem. They will have more observation than they ever will on any other job if the inspector is going to stay on site during the process. Ask what amount of time the trainer will be at your job site and what is the certification process is. All day, every day (GOOD) drive by at 30 mph (not so good)

    Contact Decra directly and see if they will train the installer, we had training from our local rep. They want you to have a good installation as much as you do. Do your home work, check references, check your installers standing at the supply house, check the BBB and be sure to post some pics of the process.

    Also, don't pay the final 20% till the roof passes a final installation inspection and you are provide a written warranty.

    :2cents:
     
  7. Jan 21, 2010 #7

    BenzMama

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    Great advice! Thanks so much. Your insight has certainly gotten us closer to getting a job well done. Now we'll just have to coordinate everything ...
     
  8. Jan 21, 2010 #8

    oldognewtrick

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    BESURE to take pics of the progress and post them here, for our entertianment ;) and your protection
     
  9. May 24, 2010 #9

    D725A

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    Thinking about a metal roof as well in New York. The two negatives on metal roofs, beside original cost, in my mind are the reported expansion and contraction popping and rain noise and possible difficulty in walking on roofs for fastener maintenance or other work like chimney re-pointing etc. I guess if the metal has a stone finish that makes it more like an asphalt roof in terms of walking safety.

    Thanks.
     
  10. May 24, 2010 #10

    oldognewtrick

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    The material in the OP was a metal, clad with stone, and it looks like a typical dimensional/architectual shingle. Metal roofing with exposed fasteners is not meant for residential applications, it is a agricultural product/barn roofs and side walls. Walking a metal roof is all but impossible.
     
  11. May 24, 2010 #11

    D725A

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    Thanks Old Dog. I assume that walking on stone clad metal shingle-roofs is doable;you meant the ones with metal surfaces(?). There may always be the periodic need for chimney or vent maintenance and I consider safety of workers a high priority.

    With the stone clad roofs, is noise a serious issue, either from expansion/contraction or rainfall?
     
  12. May 25, 2010 #12

    oldognewtrick

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    Walking on a painted metal roof is not feasible, any metal roof specs are to be installed over solid roof substrate and does not have the resonance of panels installed over space decking.
     
  13. May 25, 2010 #13

    inspectorD

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    I agree, it's funny how many metal roofs resemble a kids slide at the playground... and become one for a roofer.
    If you need access to a certain area, a ladder is usually made to hook over the roof, a bracket can be fastened permenatly to the top.
    Be safe.:)
     
  14. May 25, 2010 #14

    oldognewtrick

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    and put a piece of foam, carpet, non-abrasive scrap of some kind under the ladder to act as a buffer so you don't scratch the metal roof panel or it will start to rust when the protective coatings are damaged.
     
  15. May 25, 2010 #15

    D725A

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    Seems like these roofs require some delicate treatment; and one's choice may also depend on who's available in your area to do this special kind of work, either the installation itself or subsequent roof maintenance. Around here--northern westchester--most contractors do asphalt, and mentioning metal roofs brings the shrugging of shoulders. And perhaps my chimney guy--who's used to walking on asphalt when he's got work to do--won't feel too comfortable on the new medium.

    I also wonder how many of the new metal roof products have been tested for anything near the life span they proclaim. I would guess that any product with a stone or other surface would face degrading over time.

    Thanks.
     
  16. May 25, 2010 #16

    oldognewtrick

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    ANY roof surface is not made for pedestrian foot traffic and it will shorten the life cycle to walk on them. Qualified installers are the key factor to making any roof installation realize it's maximize potential for life span and function.

    Any type roof surface will over time fail. Jury's still out on some of the newer products and materials.
     
  17. May 26, 2010 #17

    dsonshine

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    I had to get a new roof recently and I am really tired of the shingles. We looked at doing the metal roof but I didn't want the noise plus the metal was more expensive then the ondura panels. We chose the ondura panels and they have done very well. You have to be careful when installing them because when they get hot it is very easy to break them or cause them to be warped beyond use.
     
  18. May 26, 2010 #18

    oldognewtrick

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    Good luck with your ondura panels, I personally wouldn't recommend them as they usually fail about 8-10 years and the paint starts flaking off. Expose to UV rays cause the product to turn to mulch. Its an organic based material, modern technology has moved past this type of material.

    Just my:2cents:
     

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