Automatic Gate Openers ?

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nealtw

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before we used concrete to set posts we did that with stones and pounded them down to tighten the post to the sides of the hole but wire fence corner or end should have angle braces.
upload_2018-3-29_4-45-51.jpeg
 

zannej

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Thanks, Neal. We have that on a corner post to the gate for the back 13 acres but the front gate that will have the opener is not a corner. It's just on a long run of fencing across the front. I think it's about an 800 foot run, but I could be mistaken. I used the satellite images to guesstimate the lengths and wrote the notes somewhere...
We did anchor ours in concrete but many of those posts are now tipping. Some have already fallen over. Others rotted because they weren't rated for ground contact. I may be able to add a brace like that on the inside of the gate (just out of the way of the swing) but I will probably have to do some underground bracing to keep the main post from tipping to the right (which would make the gate sag when almost closed).
 

Mastercarpenty

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It's sad but today's ACQ treated lumber just doesn't hold up- especially underground. Nobody here sells A/G treated anymore due to excessive warranty returns, everything is U/G rated. If you want it to last U/G you have to resort to home-done treatments that are no longer legal. With enough people doing that the pollution problem of CCA treated will look puny in comparison. Not all Government regulations are smart!

Phil
 

zannej

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Update. Never got this installed, but it's probably a good thing because we got hit with 2 hurricanes last year & it took the gate out. Fortunately, it only took down one gate post and the other one is sort of ok. I need to dig to adjust it, but the phoneline runs right near it so I will have to be careful.
I did find a wireless backlit keypad with a cover though.
 

zannej

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I recently watched this video:

There was another one I saw that linked to that one where the guy had a large tortoise named Coco. It wandered up while he was doing the video, he casually says "Hey, Coco" and continues his spiel.

I like the idea of using the 2x4s to reduce leaning. He mentioned 2x6s for gate posts so I will have to price out the 2x6s and find the appropriate paint/sealant to cover over. I'm debating whether I should pre-attach the 2x6s and dig out to fit around them and then hammer them in. Or would it work if I dug a larger hole big enough for the 2x6s and the post and filled with Quickrete?
 

MrMiz

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Those cracked out neighbors of yours need to go to trade school so they can weld you a metal gate and post and set it in concreate. With the price of lumber so high metal is an super attractive option. Course maybe metal in your area has gone up too? There is still a big oil boom going on in my area so it seems like the metal supply yard is loaded for dirt cheap and they always have drops from the oil field for even cheaper.
I just looked it up I got a 4x4x just under 8' for $20. They had a stack of them bigger than my truck in the "bone yard". Apparently they got a big order to cut down the 20' to size and they didn't want to haul the drop. So when I pulled up and grabbed one out of the huge stack the guy looked at me and I swear he contemplated not even charging me, but only for a sec.

I recently watched this video:

There was another one I saw that linked to that one where the guy had a large tortoise named Coco. It wandered up while he was doing the video, he casually says "Hey, Coco" and continues his spiel.

I like the idea of using the 2x4s to reduce leaning. He mentioned 2x6s for gate posts so I will have to price out the 2x6s and find the appropriate paint/sealant to cover over. I'm debating whether I should pre-attach the 2x6s and dig out to fit around them and then hammer them in. Or would it work if I dug a larger hole big enough for the 2x6s and the post and filled with Quickrete?
 
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MrMiz

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I also forgot to mention I used the method in that video regularly around here and it works great in sandy loam with clay soil. If you've got enough clay mixed in there it makes it set like concrete. I haven't put a gate on it but it works good when your pulling wire fencing tight. Normally it would tilt and lift the post out of the ground but with that support it keeps it pretty straight up. Till grandma hit's it with the tractor.

I recently watched this video:

There was another one I saw that linked to that one where the guy had a large tortoise named Coco. It wandered up while he was doing the video, he casually says "Hey, Coco" and continues his spiel.

I like the idea of using the 2x4s to reduce leaning. He mentioned 2x6s for gate posts so I will have to price out the 2x6s and find the appropriate paint/sealant to cover over. I'm debating whether I should pre-attach the 2x6s and dig out to fit around them and then hammer them in. Or would it work if I dug a larger hole big enough for the 2x6s and the post and filled with Quickrete?
 

Fireguy5674

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In my neck of the woods, I just go pick out a hedge tree and cut the post I want from Hedge. It will out last a treated post by about 20 years. I realize you probably don't have that option.

If you are going to pull a fairly long run of fence, another option is a brace post. Set your corner post, then about 6' to 8' away set another post. Close to the top of both posts, place a bar or heavy piece of wood parallel to the ground and secure to the posts. Then run a loop of #9 or heavier wire from the bottom of corner post diagonally to the horizontal bar at the brace post. Secure where it goes around both posts. Now place a 2 x 4, a short heavy stick or a piece of pipe through the wire loop. Twist the wire until everything is tight. You have now built a system that has two triangles and should not be able to move. The key system the video refers to could be incorporated into this as well. If you are going to run fence another direction from this corner repeat in that direction. If you want to put a gate in, use this on both sides of the gate. I would also find 9' posts and bury 4' at corners and gates. Obviously that gives your posts more support. Fences built this way are more work and expense, but will be there for decades with no issue.

If grandma hits that with the tractor it might be hard on the tractor.
 

zannej

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Thanks for the replies.
To clarify: I have fencing run but it has been damaged in several spots because trees on the other side were uprooted and the roots pulled some of the posts up and tore the fence. There are large pits underneath-- I'd say some are at least 5' deep if not deeper. The post itself got snapped off just above grand level. The other post is wobbly.

Metal in my area did go up and is harder to find (also harder to drill through).

I wish my cracked out neighbors would help, but then, they'd feel they are owed something so it's best that they don't. Considering I suspect they poisoned two of my dogs, I'm not wanting them anywhere near my home.

I watched a helpful video on how to mount the Mighty Mule gate opener. I believe I have an old flattened rectangular metal plate a late elderly friend gave me, so I may be able to use it to mount hardware. I will need to get still images from my videos to show the current state of the gate and fence posts-- as well as the huge uprooted trees. Too bad we don't have those guys from TV who are looking for logs. They would love these trees-- big oaks with lots of wood.
 
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